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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through August 08, 2004 * Nottingham- Opinions? < Previous Next >

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Mark Bushey
Junior Member
Username: Spiff95

Post Number: 53
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Saturday, July 24, 2004 - 10:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was in the LHBS today picking up some stuff for tomorrow's brew session, and was looking through the yeast fridge. He usually only carries Munton's dry ale yeast, but since my last visit he's added some dry yeasts from SafBrew and Lallemand. I picked up a couple of packs of Nottingham and was wondering how it differs from Munton's (if at all) or Wyeast 1056.
Does anyone have info or an opinion on this yeast?
 

Stephen Manchester
Junior Member
Username: Smanches

Post Number: 32
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Saturday, July 24, 2004 - 11:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I use it for natural sodas, since it floccates(sp?) so well. It works very well.
 

Marlon Lang
Intermediate Member
Username: Marlonlang

Post Number: 316
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 12:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Normally, I wait for the gurus like Bill Pierce, chumley, and Denny Conn to comment on yeast, but since Bill is in Iowa this week, I will opine. Nottingham dry yeast is known as a "dry" yeast because of it's high attenuation, i.e. how low the final gravity will be. The final gravity will be lower than the W1056. I have no knowledge of the Munton's yeast but I would suspect that it would finish higher. As Stephen says, Nottingham is also very floucclent. Your post does not say which SafBrew yeast you saw, so I suggest you do a search here on HBD for the particular type and see the previous comments.
 

Dan Listermann
Intermediate Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 274
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 03:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I find that Muntons regular yeast can throw phenols. Muntons Gold is wonderful for fruity flavors and Nottingham is better for "cleaner" flavors.
 

Paul Hayslett
Intermediate Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 457
Registered: 02-2002
Posted on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 04:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I hate Nottingham. Everything I've made with it has come out thin, watery, and way too dry. The only way I'll ever use it again is as a bottling yeast. If you plan to use it as your main yeast, steep like a pound of Carapils so the finished product will at least have a little body.
 

JimTanguay
Member
Username: Pizzaman

Post Number: 230
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 06:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You will find a lot of strong opinions about Nottingham both pro and con. It is what it is, a neutral and very attuntive yeast that IMO performs very well and is easy to use. Just be aware that it will finish dry and formulate your recipe accordingly. I like to use it at a low tempature mid 50's to 60's and make Lager like beers.
 

Dan Mourglea
Intermediate Member
Username: Cataclysmbrewer

Post Number: 435
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 07:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I second Nottingham as good for lager-like beers; IMO, Nottingham makes terrific cream-ales and I also use it when fermenting the base for my fruit beers. I have been less pleased with its performance in pale ales; as others have noted it finishes very dry (I haven't tried formulating a pale ale recipe with extra carapils). It would probably make a very good, very dry, Irish Stout--I've been meaning to make one but I end up at the last minute making an oatmeal stout instead and using WLP Irish ale yeast (one I have ranched and reused a few times).
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 1422
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 08:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Since I payed more attention to my receipe formulation none of my brews have turned out dry, not even with nottingham.

The limit (it can't be dryer than this) is set in the recipe/mashing. The choice of strain may make it sweeter than this limit, but never dryer. As far as I understand Nottingham fermentes fairly close the the limit, within half a point something while other strains may finished several points or more above the limit.

If this is accounted for I see no reason nottingham should give you a dry beer? It doesn't make much sense to me to fix the recipe/mashing scheme until you know what yeast that will be used.

That said my AG methods isn't reproducable yet, in every brew so far I missed target. But has worked perfect in all the extract brews. My early AG's was too sweet, and that last one too dry. But I'm learning. In neither case do I blame the yeast for this.

/Fredrik
 

jeff wright
Junior Member
Username: Barly

Post Number: 55
Registered: 07-2003
Posted on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 11:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mark,
Nottingham works well as others have said. I too use it when making lager-like ales. In my experiences it finishes 8 to 10 points lower than Munton's dry. I don't find my finished beer to be thin, just rather crisp and clean.
Jeff
 

Mark Bushey
Junior Member
Username: Spiff95

Post Number: 54
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 08:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks all,

I'm brewing an amber honey wheat ale today and I was going to try the Nottingham. I'm using some crystal and a few pounds of dark wheat malt. I guess I should expect less body and a dryer taste?
 

John Oberley
New Member
Username: Joberley

Post Number: 8
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 02:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just botteld (Tap-A-Drafted?) an American IPA today which had been in secondary 3 weeks. I used Nottingham, and it took it all the way from 1.066 to 1.010. Now THAT is some serious attenuation. It didn't seem too bad out of the gravity sample though. We'll see how it turns out.

I've always had high attenuation with Nottingham, but never this high.
 

Pacman
Member
Username: Pacman

Post Number: 230
Registered: 04-2003
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 02:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does anyone have info or an opinion on this yeast?

It sucks?....

Disclaimer: I don't have *000+ posts so I am most likely wrong...
Damn Brewing's Fun!!!!
 

Frank Marsh
Junior Member
Username: Brewer

Post Number: 98
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 02:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Since you are looking for opinions I will give you my experience with nottingham. I only used it once a while back for a Pale Ale I believe, I did NOT like the way it turned out. I was expecting a cleaner flavor profile than what I ended up with.(a little funk and slight clove) IMHO nothing beats a pure liquid yeast culture. If I am going to spend a good part of my day brewing, I want the insurance of a healthy liquid yeast, why skimp and buy dry yeast and risk sub par results?
Live to Brew
Brew to Live
 

Dan Listermann
Intermediate Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 280
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 03:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Frank, let me assure you that your single experience with Nottingham was atypical.

Note to Pac: I could be wrong.

Dan Listermann
 

Pacman
Member
Username: Pacman

Post Number: 235
Registered: 04-2003
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 03:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

it's not atypical.. i've reproduced the same results on a couple of batches with nottingham.... if it doesn't eat the sht out of the flavor it can leave a funky, belgian like flavor in the beer.... nottingham is a weird-a yeast.... use liquid!!!!!

I don't have *000+ posts so I am most likely wrong
Damn Brewing's Fun!!!!
 

Dan Listermann
Intermediate Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 281
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 03:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pac, I have never noticed Nottingham throwing phenols and I use it a lot. As a matter of fact the American Pale Ale that I am drinking as I type was fermented with Nottingham and it is very good, not a thing "Belgian" about it. I find it far more dependable than Munton's Regular.

Of course my head could well be up my "vent."
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 1427
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 06:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've posted this opinon before, but here it goes again, with my limited experience the only noticable extra flavours I've seen out of nottingham is that

1) >68F there are some mild funky whiskey notes (esters/fuesels or whatever it is). I don't like these.

2) at higher pitching rates/lower temps there is a fruity pineapple background aroma which is excellent. If you want to know what I am talking about take an entire pack, and pour into into a small jar with some wort and when it's finished there will have a clear fresh/sweetish pineapple aroma I think you can't miss. Some batches I ago I pitched I think 2 packs in 5 gallons, and in this case these notes where barely detecable, but there in maybe "every other glass".

So my impression of nottingham is that it performs the way I persoanlly prefer at high pitching rates (2+ packs) and 55-62F. I will never use it >68F again.

/Fredrik
 

Brett Hetherington
Junior Member
Username: Bretth

Post Number: 80
Registered: 08-2002
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 07:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've noticed the funk! It's not a belgian funk, it's more like an infected funk.
With that said, I must say I like Nottingham, it just requires a few weeks in secondary for the yeast to devour the funky taste, but it will go away. I'm relieved that other people have noticed it, I thought I was just a nasty brewer for awhile. Dry hopping and cold conditioning also seems to help the funk.

-Brett H
 

Pacman
Member
Username: Pacman

Post Number: 236
Registered: 04-2003
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 12:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

man, i guess i had a few too many last nite..

Now that I have a clear head I remember the batches that had the really funky aroma/flavor also had a bit of rye in them.. i'm guessing it was a combination of the rye and the nottingham funk that really threw me off... the rest of the batches i've used it in the nottingham just ate everything out of them...

but what the hell do I know...
Damn Brewing's Fun!!!!
 

Pacman
Member
Username: Pacman

Post Number: 237
Registered: 04-2003
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 12:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

brett, it sounds like what you are saying is that it takes nottingham a couple of weeks to eat all the flavor out of the beer, a few more weeks for it to eat it's own funk out of the beer and then you dryhop to add flavor back to the beer..
Damn Brewing's Fun!!!!
 

Fritz Eubanks
New Member
Username: Fritzeubanks

Post Number: 13
Registered: 05-2003
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 01:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A few thoughts.

I know that Denny has commented before about a "tart" flavor when using Nott. My experience is much the same. There has been some speculation that it may be related to water chemistry, but I also end up with beers that are notoriously under attenuated, for reasons I'm still trying to work out.

Fritz
"What care I how time advances?
I am drinking ale today." - Edgar Allen Poe
 

Adam W
Intermediate Member
Username: Adam_w

Post Number: 295
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 05:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nottingham is very good. If you want a highly attenuative clean yeast then you can't do much better.

In my experience, lotsa homebrewers are big fat slobs who aren't happy unless their beer is the equivalent of a doughnut in a pint-glass (no offense :-)). If that describes you...then choose a different yeast that will leave more sugars hanging around so you can have your "body".
 

Pacman
Member
Username: Pacman

Post Number: 247
Registered: 04-2003
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 06:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

...big fat slobs who aren't happy unless their beer is the equivalent of a doughnut in a pint-glass

hahahahaha.. er, uh.. hey!

What's wrong with a doughnut in a glass? I guess the next thing you'll say is that I should quit putting whipped cream on top of my beers to make up for my lack of head retention

pay no attention to this post... I know nothing...
Damn Brewing's Fun!!!!
 

Tom Meier
Member
Username: Brewdawg96

Post Number: 122
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 06:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

lotsa homebrewers are big fat slobs who aren't happy unless their beer is the equivalent of a doughnut in a pint-glass

Easy now, I am about 20 lbs under ideal weight, but I still say Howard Johnson is right! The only styles I would use Nottingham in again are a) a highly hopped barleywine or b) a highly hopped strong IPA

The yeast signature (esters, flavor, etc.) is just downright funky. Agree with Pac, even though he has less than 300 posts.

Where this yeast shines is its tolerance to alcohol (seen it ferment to 15%+ abv) and its /relatively/ clean aroma and high attenuation that brings hops to forefront.

To the guy who wants to try it in a stout, I was unhappy with it. Of course, Denny's Law applies here so I expect no one to agree with that.
 

Brett Hetherington
Junior Member
Username: Bretth

Post Number: 83
Registered: 08-2002
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 07:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

...lotsa homebrewers are big fat slobs who aren't happy unless their beer is the equivalent of a doughnut in a pint-glass...

Hey! I brew alot with Nottingham and I'm still a big fat slob, so there goes that theory.
Pacman, what you said is about right, except it only takes about a week to get through the sugars. Now I'm not much of a sweet beer fan so Nottingham suits me. I do admit that I dry hop lightly to keep the taste balanced, but there is definitely more flavor in my beer than your average American lager.

-Brett H
 

don price
Intermediate Member
Username: Donzoid

Post Number: 400
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 09:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well I've done about six Nottingham brews this summer. Previously I used WY1056 or WLP001 for these brews and the Nottingham produced dryer brews. Of course these are mostly fake lagers so clean and dry is what I'm looking for. I've only sampled half of them so the jury is still out. Funky doesn't seem to a problem but I bet it won't have anywhere to hide in the fake Dort Export and Czech Pilsner beers.

Don
 

Craig Johnson
Member
Username: Californiacraig

Post Number: 215
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 06:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

MMMMMMM Doughnuts!!!!
 

Mark Bushey
Junior Member
Username: Spiff95

Post Number: 55
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 06:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks to everyone for your posts. I'm fermenting an amber wheat ale with Nottingham right now, so I'll let you all know how it turns out (and if I can stand da funk).
 

JimTanguay
Member
Username: Pizzaman

Post Number: 235
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 06:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

those of you who get funky flavours with nottingham are you sure you didn't accidently pitch windsor? the package looks almost the same and I find windsor or little funky.
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 1437
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 07:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The "funk" i've seen once in nottingham are what I like to label "whiskey/fuesel" funk. It happened the one time used it > 68F. It was not as funky as bishop finger but still not what I personally desire. I figure it's a matter of taste. If you like the flavour you probably wont describe it as funky?

/Fredrik