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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through August 30, 2004 * Doing a Eis beer < Previous Next >

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Wm John Ivey
Member
Username: Fat_elvis

Post Number: 239
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Friday, August 27, 2004 - 02:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In my ever pushing the envelope, I have decided to try to make a Eis beer. I brewing a Irish Red this weekend, after the secondary is done I plan to rack it into a 1/8 keg container (looks like a corny with a sanke top) throw it into the chest freezer and presto beersicle. I still thinking on how to rack the beer off the ice plug, maybe drilling a hole with a new clean bit. I was also thinking maybe inserting the sankespear back in and work it out should leave me a good size hole.
Has anyone done Eis beers and how did you get the beer out?
Thanks
John
 

PalerThanAle
Senior Member
Username: Palerthanale

Post Number: 1052
Registered: 04-2002
Posted on Friday, August 27, 2004 - 03:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm pretty sure the ice that will form will not be solid - but will be more slushy. I've never done one (I am planning on making an eis mead later this year when I can do it in my garage) but people in my club have and they describe the process as scooping the ice off the top leaving the concentrated beer there.

PTA
 

scott jackson
Member
Username: Kroc

Post Number: 134
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Friday, August 27, 2004 - 03:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You are not supposed to freeze the beer solid. Just freeze it until ice crystals form on the sides and bottom. Then rack the beer off. Plan on loosing about 10% of the volume to the ice.
 

Wm John Ivey
Member
Username: Fat_elvis

Post Number: 240
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Friday, August 27, 2004 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What temp should I set the freezer somewhere close to 32F and how long?
John
 

PaulK
Junior Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 98
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Friday, August 27, 2004 - 09:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've done a bunch of eisbocks. Depending on how big a beer it is, it takes about 20-25 degrees to get it to the right slushiness. I've lost closer to a third to ice each time I've done it. Simply pump it out when ready.
 

scott jackson
Member
Username: Kroc

Post Number: 135
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Friday, August 27, 2004 - 10:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A third, wow. Did the alcohol content go up a third to?

Prehaps I will do a double Eisbock. Freeze it twice. Hmmmmmmmmmmm
 

Dan Listermann
Intermediate Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 408
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Saturday, August 28, 2004 - 12:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Beer freezes like a snow cone from the outside in. There are flakes of ice with high alcohol beer in between. Freeze it as cold as you can. I used to simply invert the carboy and let it thaw until it the runnings tasted boring.

Dan Listermann
 

Bill Tobler
Intermediate Member
Username: Billt

Post Number: 260
Registered: 08-2001
Posted on Saturday, August 28, 2004 - 12:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Another way you can remove some of the water is to rack the beer into your secondary fermenter which should be a glass carboy. (SS would probably work, but you can't see inside.) Put the carboy into a larger container and pack ice around the fermenter. Then sprinkle rock salt on the ice. You should spin the carboy often. Ice will start to form on the glass inside. When you think its done, rack it off into another fermenter and either repeat or move on.

I did this by accident my very first year of brewing. I was trying to cool down the beer for some reason or other, and ended up making an "Ice Ale." It turned out pretty good, but I didn't keep notes back then.

I have to edit this post. I don't remember if I made a slurry with the ice or not. I seem to remember using lots of salt though... You might want to experiment with water first.

(Message edited by billt on August 28, 2004)
Bill Tobler
Lake Jackson,Texas
BrewBayou
My Brewery
 

Dan Listermann
Intermediate Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 409
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Saturday, August 28, 2004 - 01:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I had a customer who used the brine method but then acetone and dry ice to finish. Well almost finish, to remove ALL the water, according to him at least, he mixed builder's lime in it. He said that it settled out.

Dan Listermann
 

Stephen Manchester
Junior Member
Username: Smanches

Post Number: 85
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Saturday, August 28, 2004 - 01:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wouldn't the alcohol freeze at dry ice temperatures though?
 

Bill Tobler
Intermediate Member
Username: Billt

Post Number: 261
Registered: 08-2001
Posted on Saturday, August 28, 2004 - 01:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here are some mixtures you can make to freeze stuff...
Bill Tobler
Lake Jackson,Texas
BrewBayou
My Brewery
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 2167
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Saturday, August 28, 2004 - 03:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ummm..I am missing something here...stick keg in fridge at 20F...it partially freezes...ice floats to the top...dip tube at the bottom...attach CO2 tank and transfer to another keg via jumper line...done.
 

Dan Listermann
Intermediate Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 410
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Saturday, August 28, 2004 - 03:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chumley, beer doesn't freeze top down. It feezes outside in. If it is partially frozen there will be a hollow contained in ice around the walls under the frozen cap.
 

Kent Fletcher
Intermediate Member
Username: Fletch

Post Number: 469
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Saturday, August 28, 2004 - 04:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Take a cornie, shorten the dip tube about 2-3 inches, rebend as needed to center the open end in the keg.
 

Swede
New Member
Username: Swede

Post Number: 13
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Saturday, August 28, 2004 - 08:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a doppelbock that is waiting to be iced, but I had planned to do it the other way.....cool it down and remove the ice instead of the beer and repeat this a few times.
 

Dave Witt
Intermediate Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 461
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Saturday, August 28, 2004 - 10:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Me and my brewing partner did an eisbock last year. We divided the 8+ gal of 1.092 doppelbock into two 5 gal buckets and placed in the temp controlled freezer. We inched the temp down a couple degrees a day starting at 25F, and strained ice that formed daily, til we had strained off enough ice (about 2.5 gal, melted). Temp ended up at 19F. Each time we opened the buckets, they were flushed with CO2 to prevent oxidation while straining. The beer is now an estimated 13%+.
 

Sand
Member
Username: Sand

Post Number: 117
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, August 30, 2004 - 02:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nothing like making a simple thing hard. I made an eis bock a few years ago, this is how it went. First put the keg in the freezer, wait for it to start to freeze. The more it freezes the higher alcy it will be. Next draw off as much as you can to the next keg and carb and enjoy!
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 2180
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Monday, August 30, 2004 - 03:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What Sand says makes sense. I do not understand Dan's reply. So what if it freezes from the sides in? The dip tubes on the kegs I have are at least 1/3 the way over from the wall to the center, if you are worried about it, do what Kent suggests and bend it, you can always bend it back later.

My only eisbock was made 14 years ago inadvertantly during a cold snap when the temperature never rose above -20F for a week. I left a glass carboy of bock below a leaky cellar window. One day I checked on it, and saw that about 1/3 of the bock had frozen into slush. I stuck a plastic hose through the slush, siphoned it into my bottling bucket, and bottled it. Although it was an extract beer, it was the best damn bock I have ever brewed.