Topics Topics Help/Instructions Help Edit Profile Profile Member List Register  
Search Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Visit The Brewery's sponsor!
Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through October 28, 2004 * Newbie question; first extract brew today < Previous Next >

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
  ClosedClosed: New threads not accepted on this page        

Author Message
 

tom ahn
New Member
Username: Nyc_sud

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 02:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi all, I was hoping some of the senior members could answer some questions for me. The kit was a dried malt extract Bass Ale clone.

I cooked my first extract batch today. During the initial boil after the hops (pellets) were added, I was distracted for a couple of minutes. Of course I had the dreaded boil over! I did notice a lot of the hops on the side of the pot and in a puddle under the burner. I continues to boil for the wort for an hour.

How badly is this going to affect the finished product?

Second question: I read on a site by John Palmer to boil the water that will be added to the fermenter. Will I get poor results if I didn't boil the water? I have NYC water run thru a filter

Third question: Should I buy a glass carboy for secondary fermentation?

Thanks in advance for your input.
 

Dan Mourglea
Intermediate Member
Username: Cataclysmbrewer

Post Number: 450
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 02:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Welcome Tom and good luck with your new obsession (if it isn't one yet it probably will be).

Lets see. . .

1. The effect really depends on how long the hops were in there before the boil over and how much you lost (I wouldn't worry about. . .RDWHAHB--relax don't worry have a homebrew; you'll see that a lot)

2. Filtered water will be fine, boiling is not necessary IMHO--a wise man said, if it is safe for drinking it is very likely safe for brewing.

3. NOPE, don't worry bout the glass fermenter. . .plastic will do just fine atleast for several weeks. I would not worry about glass fermenters unless you make something that you intend to age for several months or longer.
 

ELK
Advanced Member
Username: Elkski

Post Number: 903
Registered: 01-2003
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 02:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

dont worry about the loss of hops its to late now.
filtered tap water will be ok unless it gives your beer and infection. IF you pitched a large amount of yeast and gave them enough oxygen, they will win any battle with the bad guys. IMHO. glass is not required but it is nice if you like to look at it from the side and for long ferments I guess it is less permeable than plastic. You might just have some beer by t -day..congrats.
ELK
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 909
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 12:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ELK, there is no reason tap water should cause an infection. If the water is safe for drinking it is safe for brewing. If the water has a lot of added chlorine (enough that you can taste it) it's best to use an activated charcoal filter. But if the water tastes all right it should not pose any problems for extract brewing and even for all-grain beers in the majority of cases.
 

Wykowski
Senior Member
Username: Bigearl

Post Number: 1181
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 01:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I boiled the hops overboard on my 1st brew too, it came out fine
You remember that foul evening when you heard the banshees howl
There was lousy drunken bastards singing 'Billy is in the bowl'
They took you up to midnight mass and left you in the lurch
So you dropped a button in the plate and spewed up in the church

 

ELK
Advanced Member
Username: Elkski

Post Number: 906
Registered: 01-2003
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 02:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Safe to drink! that is the question? I think we all would be suprised at what we drink from the tap. Municipal water systems are so complex and so many factors (seasonal, construction, etc) and no real time testing is done at the end of every service loop. All in all we have very safe water. We think! The problem is when we get sick we don't even blame the water over grandma's cooking. And after the fact its to late to check. We haven't even touched on individual or homeowners Assc. water systems. I stick by my words.
ELK
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 915
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 02:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The wort is boiled, which will kill any bacterial contaminants. That's one of the reasons for the popularity of weak beer in the Middle Ages, when the Plague threatened and public health as we know it was nonexistent.
 

Patrick C.
Member
Username: Patrickc

Post Number: 195
Registered: 01-2001
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 02:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tom was asking about water for topping up the fermenter, which would not be boiled. I also think it would be fine, but as ELK says it's not 100% guaranteed.

OT, but how would beer keep you from getting the Plague? Wasn't it spread by parasites, or was it also waterborne?

(Message edited by patrickc on October 25, 2004)
 

Bob Boufford
Member
Username: Bobb

Post Number: 160
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 03:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi,

I think Tom was asking about water added to the fermenter in addition to the boiled wort. In this situation, ELK could be right concerning the quality of water. All we need is to look at Waterton, ON which came up in the Canadian news again recently. I would lean more to "safe to drink even though the water may contain non-pathogenic organisms" that may however be problematic for beer.
 

ELK
Advanced Member
Username: Elkski

Post Number: 907
Registered: 01-2003
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 03:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

And I wouldn't want to use un boiled water in Florida right now for my beer.
 

John Baer
Junior Member
Username: Beerman

Post Number: 58
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 03:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tom,
Don't worry about it and see how the end product turns out. I'm sure most people have done exactly what you did with your first batch, I know I did.

JB
 

Terry Neudorf
Junior Member
Username: Terry

Post Number: 44
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 03:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Trying to boil 5 gallons of water on a kitchen stove is a real pain(been there done that). Just take your chances with tap water. There will be chlorine in tap water but you could let it sit open overnight and a lot of it would dissipate but that exposes the water to possible airborne contaminates. You could spend more money and by a jug of R.O. water, or spend even more money and buy a propane burner and a boil pot(I guess then you'd need a wort chiller too), or spend even more money and go to all grain brewing. What ever you do, don't give up, come back to this board for lots of good advice.
 

Richard Shaffer
Junior Member
Username: Mr_baseball

Post Number: 40
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 04:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tom,
Don't turn your back on a brew pot of boiling extract brew, it is highly concentrated and wants nothing better than to boil over on your stovetop. Always keep a spray bottle of water next to your boil and when the foam raises it's ugly head, fan it with the spray. No problems. The worst thing you can do to your beer is worry. Beer is a pretty resiliant creature. Richard.
 

Doug Pescatore
Advanced Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 969
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 04:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ELK,
Don't worry about Florida's water. We have some of the safest and worst tasting water in the world. In fact even though my town lost power for almost a week with the first hurricane, we never lost water pressure and the city was able to keep the water treatment plant on line the entire time.

Tom is using NYC water which is about as pure as you can get. It typically beats out every brand of spring water on the market. The water is piped in from the Catskills mountians (hills for those of you out west) about 60 miles away. New York has been more proactive about protecting the watershed that provides their drinking water than most other states.

Like I said before, we may be free of all those heavy metals and stuff down here in Florida but man it sure doesn't taste very good.

-Doug
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 1124
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 06:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So if you're in FLA and you brew with sulfer water, does lagering help?


Just kidding. I've had some artesian well water that makes fermenting lagers smell clean. Wouldn't dream of brewing with that.