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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through November 30, 2004 * S/T number? < Previous Next >

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Walt Fischer
Senior Member
Username: Walt

Post Number: 1925
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Sunday, November 21, 2004 - 12:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yoooo..

Hey what S/T number should i look for when trying to determine if a malt is so under modifyed that itll need a rest?

Walt
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 1236
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Sunday, November 21, 2004 - 02:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Walt, this is the best reference I know for interpreting a malt analysis: http://www.brewingtechniques.com/bmg/noonan.html

Here is the relevant section:

Soluble protein (% SP) or nitrogen (% TSN): The amount of protein or nitrogen in soluble form, expressed as a percentage of malt weight. In whichever terms it is expressed, the SP or TSN parameters are used to calculate the soluble nitrogen ratio.

Soluble Nitrogen Ratio (% SNR). This ratio (also expressed as S/T [soluble/total], SN/TN [soluble nitrogen/total nitrogen], or Kolbach Index) is calculated by dividing the soluble nitrogen (or protein) value by the percent total nitrogen (or protein).

The SNR is an important indicator of malt modification. The higher the number, the more highly modified the malt. Malts destined for infusion mashing should have an SNR of 36-42%, or up to 45% for light-bodied beer. At a percentage much over 45% SNR, the beer will be thin in body and mouthfeel. For traditional lager malts, 30-33% indicates undermodification, and 37-40% indicates overmodification.

Brewers can accommodate increases in total protein and SNR by adding or modifying low-temperature rests. Decreases are accomodated by shortening the duration of or deleting low-temperature rests.
 

Walt Fischer
Senior Member
Username: Walt

Post Number: 1926
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Sunday, November 21, 2004 - 07:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Cool.. thanks Bill!
I was curious cause im using a differnet base this year for the Sami, and couldnt remember :-)
This year im using Meussdoerffer Pilsen.
I checked the lot number and its at 40.5, so it looks like its certainly modifyed enough to skip the protein rest, which is what I thought, but just wanted to make sure :-)
Ive got 2 bags of it sitting here, justa waitN :-)

Just started building the starter today for the Dec 4th brew :-)

opps.. gotta stop... just reached my 4 smilely limit...

Walt