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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through November 30, 2004 * Recipe eval? < Previous Next >

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Scott Folsom
New Member
Username: Sfolsom

Post Number: 25
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Sunday, November 28, 2004 - 10:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can I get some comments on this recipe? I'm not sure about the brown sugar, but I understand it's common in English Bitters. Or should I use .5 lbs 40L crystal malt instead?

I wanted to use Challenger as my boil hop, but I'm out. No. Brewer is the only thing I have in stock that's appropriate.

I know what you PNW guys would say, but no, I'm not putting "C" hops in my English Bitter.... :-)

Folsom's Best Bitter #3

A ProMash Recipe Report

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (Gal): 6.00 Wort Size (Gal): 6.00
Total Grain (Lbs): 10.00
Anticipated OG: 1.045 Plato: 11.20
Anticipated SRM: 13.9
Anticipated IBU: 31.8
Brewhouse Efficiency: 72 %
Wort Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Pre-Boil Amounts
----------------

Evaporation Rate: 1.00 Gallons Per Hour
Pre-Boil Wort Size: 7.00 Gal
Pre-Boil Gravity: 1.039 SG 9.65 Plato

Formulas Used
-------------

Brewhouse Efficiency and Predicted Gravity based on Method #1, Potential Used.
Final Gravity Calculation Based on Points.
Hard Value of Sucrose applied. Value for recipe: 46.2100 ppppg
Yield Type used in Gravity Prediction: Fine Grind Dry Basis.

Color Formula Used: Morey
Hop IBU Formula Used: Garetz

Additional Utilization Used For First Wort Hops: -10 %


Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
5.0 0.50 lbs. Brown Sugar (dark) Generic 1.046 60
65.0 6.50 lbs. Pale Malt(2-row) Great Britain 1.038 3
30.0 3.00 lbs. Amber Malt Great Britain 1.032 35

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.00 oz. Goldings - B.C. Whole 4.00 9.0 First WH
1.25 oz. Northern Brewer Whole 7.00 21.8 60 min.
1.00 oz. Goldings - B.C. Whole 4.00 1.0 15 min.


Extras

Amount Name Type Time
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.00 Unit(s)Whirlfloc Fining 20 Min.(boil)


Yeast
-----

White Labs WLP013 London Ale


Water Profile
-------------

Profile: London
Profile known for: Sweet Stout

Calcium(Ca): 90.0 ppm
Magnesium(Mg): 4.0 ppm
Sodium(Na): 24.0 ppm
Sulfate(SO4): 58.0 ppm
Chloride(Cl): 18.0 ppm
biCarbonate(HCO3): 123.0 ppm

pH: 8.33


Mash Schedule
-------------

Mash Type: Single Step

Grain Lbs: 9.50
Water Qts: 10.52 - Before Additional Infusions
Water Gal: 2.63 - Before Additional Infusions

Qts Water Per Lbs Grain: 1.11 - Before Additional Infusions

Saccharification Rest Temp : 150 Time: 0
Mash-out Rest Temp : 165 Time: 0
Sparge Temp : 180 Time: 0


Total Mash Volume Gal: 3.39 - Dough-In Infusion Only

All temperature measurements are degrees Fahrenheit.
 

Dan Listermann
Advanced Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 742
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Sunday, November 28, 2004 - 11:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I wish Promash would put a couple more spaces between the percentages and pound of things. It would make things a lot easier to read.

The brown sugar is fine. Why so much Amber malt?

Dan Listermann
 

Dan Listermann
Advanced Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 743
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Sunday, November 28, 2004 - 11:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh another thing. I doubt that brown sugar can contribute 46 points per gallon per pound considering it is a miost product when corn sugar contributes 46 dry. I could be all wet about this.

Dan Listermann
 

Doug W
Member
Username: Pivorat

Post Number: 128
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, November 29, 2004 - 01:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan,

Your wet alright, the Moisture content in Brown Sugars, both Light and Dark, are derived from the Molasses itself added to dry sugar, be it beet or cane, and is probably higher then the others instead of lower, reason being for one is that molasses can fill in the spaces around the sugar crystals and the stuff we use at work is of a extremely high Gravity, more so then what you get at the grocery store. Dark and Light Molasses varies on how heavy the molasses is processed and the overall degree of solids, as for 850lbs of Sugar, we add about 56lbs of Light molasses for light brown, and about 40ish lbs for Dark Brown Molasses. All molasses added to sugar for making the brown sugars is from cane because beet molasses is considered inferior and has a bitter taste. Oh, and something else to consider on molasses water content, We store it by the tons in tanks, and or in 2 ton containers, and its water content is so low we have virtually 0% chance of infection or other cultures/yeasts/etc problems. And to date havent had a infection of any sort in the companies 100+ year history.
 

Dan Listermann
Advanced Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 745
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Monday, November 29, 2004 - 01:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Doug, we are talking about weight, not space. Molasses has a weight of which a portion is water and must reduce the potential sugar when compared to a dry product. I don't know, but I would expect that molasses might be about 15% water judging by the way honey and malt extract flow at their 20% water content. At five percent, it may be insignificant.

Dan Listermann

Why was "five percent" in numbers censored?
 

Jeffery Swearengin
Advanced Member
Username: Beertracker

Post Number: 560
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Monday, November 29, 2004 - 03:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't see anything wrong with adding such a small amount of brown sugar, although its typically "NOT" used in British brewing. I'd replace at least 1/2 of the Amber malt with some caramel/crystal malt (20-60°L) unless you want to produce an overly bitter & toasty version?
CHEERS! Beertracker

"From man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world." ~ Saint Arnold of Metz (580-640) - Patron Saint of Brewers

 

Beerboy AKA The Jolly Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 578
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Monday, November 29, 2004 - 01:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I wouldn't say amber was bitter, but it has a very distinct flavour. 1 pound is enough to make it's presence felt. Unless you particularly like the flavour I'd cut it right down. Hops look good tho'.
Real Ale Crusader and all round Hophead
 

Scott Folsom
Junior Member
Username: Sfolsom

Post Number: 26
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Monday, November 29, 2004 - 06:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

DOH! Forgot to say it's a slight modification of a recipe from the Durden Park book of a beer from 1896 I think. It's another beer for the show I'm working on. I thought I would do a beer from the year the play was written. It's The Imortance of Being Earnest. 19th century play, 19th century beer.

I already decided to cut down the amber last night at work, so I'll cut it to 1.5 lbs. I definately want the charcter to be pronounced though.