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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through June 27, 2005 * Store yeast from primary < Previous Next >

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Michael Michaelsen
Junior Member
Username: Mikemike

Post Number: 58
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 02:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am transferring denny's rye to secundary tomorrow. I want to save the CL50 yeast for a APA next weekend. How do I go about that?

Regards
Mike
 

Dave Bossie
Junior Member
Username: Boss_brew

Post Number: 37
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 03:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In it's simplest form, scoop some of the yeast cake with a sanitized spoon into a sanitized jar, along with a small amount of the beer to cover it. Seal it and refrigerate it until you're ready to pitch (letting it warm up to room temp of course). I believe that you can keep it up to a couple of weeks. Good luck!
Dave
 

damon
Member
Username: Nomad

Post Number: 120
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 01:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you don't have a jar, a brand-new, as yet un-opened, ziplock bag is also sanitary.
 

Paul Erbe
Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 235
Registered: 05-2001
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 02:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I primary in a big 6.5 gallon Carboy. After racking the beer to secondary, I add maybe a quart of filtered water, shake and pour into several clean mason jars. These get stored in the fridge and if used within a couple of months I will pitch without a starter.
"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline. It helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least, you need a beer."
-- Frank Zappa
 

Vince Turley
Member
Username: Vince

Post Number: 190
Registered: 05-2003
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 02:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have started to do as Paul describes... although I have been decanting the water and making a starter. I fill the mason jar with about 2" of slurry, and top off with pre-boiled filtered water.

I would be curious to hear if others are doing without the starter, and just decant/pitch... this certainly would be easier.

Paul, ever had any problems pitching without a starter?
 

Richard Nye
Advanced Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 748
Registered: 01-2004
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 03:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would use the slurry directly without a starter if it's less than about 2 weeks old. If it's older than that, I'd feed it about a pint of wort the night before to help it wake up. I also think Fredrick is onto something, and would oxygenate the yeast/wort starter for 15-30 seconds.
 

Mark Tigges
Intermediate Member
Username: Mtigges

Post Number: 303
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 03:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do without a starter. I sterilize my jars in my pressure cooker. (15 min 15psi.) Of course as soon as I open them they are no longer sterile, but equally of course, very clean. I just swirl the remnants of my fermenter and pour it in the jar, as much as will fit. Sometimes I do two, but not usually. I just don't usually need two stores of one yeast. Then I simply pour this into the wort of the batch that I want to use it for. The caveat is that this is always withen a month, and it's been stored at 5C. Any more than a month, and I would definitely make a starter and innoculate that with the yeast from the jar.
 

Dave Bossie
Junior Member
Username: Boss_brew

Post Number: 40
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 03:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh yeah...I don't use a starter either...and the batch takes off really fast! Last time was about 8-9 hours.
 

Joseph Listan
Advanced Member
Username: Poonstab

Post Number: 708
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vince,

I decant and pitch when it is up to three months old. The difference in lag time is only a few hours (less than 8). When it is less than a month old I see activity in less than 8 hours. Between one and three months I see activity within 16 hours (I'm asleep for the difference, but I typically go to bed about 8 hours after pitching [no activity] and wake up to a good kreusen). I imagine it is well under 16 hours. Either way, I aerate well and the ferment is plenty healthy.

I have done this with both WY 1968 and WY 1728, with similar results. Always been good enough for me.
 

Michael Michaelsen
Junior Member
Username: Mikemike

Post Number: 60
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 03:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How much slurry do you use for a 5gl batch without making a starter?
 

Joseph Listan
Advanced Member
Username: Poonstab

Post Number: 709
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 03:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm pitching about 1/3 to 1/2 quart of slurry (the rest of the quart is beer) into ten gallons.
 

Paul Erbe
Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 237
Registered: 05-2001
Posted on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 04:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vince - No. The yeast I use the most is 1272 and almost all of the beers are in the 1.050-1.075 range. I suppose if I was going to do a big beer in the 1.090 - 1.1 or greater I would either pitch right on the whole cake or start one of my smaller slurries in a gallon or two.
"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline. It helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least, you need a beer."
-- Frank Zappa