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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through August 27, 2005 * Hop flowering conditions < Previous Next >

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Carlos Martinez
Junior Member
Username: Wences

Post Number: 33
Registered: 06-2003
Posted From: 63.87.170.72
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - 09:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I planted two rhyzomes of cascade and willamette last march. The cascade never sprout but the willamette did. They are now about 12 to 15 feet tall with at least 7 branches comming out of a single sprout and climbing the lines.
I read in the wikipedia that "Hops begin to flower about the latter end of June or the beginning of July," It's august and I still haven't see any cone in the plant.
I live in a very hot area in Mexico (Monterrey) and I wanted to know if there are climate conditions for the plant to flower.
I am not expecting a lot of flowers to grow but I want to see at least one.
Is the excesive heat preventing the plant for flowering? is there anything I can add to the plant (enzymes) to help it to flower?
Thanks for your support
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 3316
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - 12:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you just planted them this year, there may not be any cones. The plant spends most of its first year growing a healthy root system. I suspect you will have some cones next year. Hops do best where there is at least occasional frost or a dormant season. Monterrey may be "iffy" for hops, but it's certainly worth a try.

(Message edited by BillPierce on August 24, 2005)
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 1829
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.49.148.10
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - 06:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I "think" that hops are photo-periodic which means they are triggered to flower by the length of daylight received. Since you are much closer to the equator than major hop growing regions I would expect yours to flower much later.

Like Bill sez I wouldn't expect many cones the first year. Should get a few though.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 3324
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - 06:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hops sense the change in the length of the day. After the summer solstice they begin to bloom. I confess I don't know what would happen at the equator. But the more important factor is the age of the plant; new plants devote far more energy to developing healthy roots.
 

Miker
Intermediate Member
Username: Miker

Post Number: 259
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 67.1.141.98
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 03:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm not sure what would happen near the equator either, but I agree that you shouldn't be worried about the lack of cones the first year no matter where you are. I go so far as to pull any flowers I see on a first-year hop plant so the plant will send its energy into root development. The next year's crop will be more rewarding this way.
 

Bill Freeman/ER
Member
Username: Elderrat

Post Number: 103
Registered: 10-2001
Posted From: 66.25.120.113
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 03:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill P, in line with this thread, is there any way to determine economically the ibus in home grown hops? Or are we just throwin' 'em in and hoping for the best?
Bill Freeman aka Elder Rat
KP Brewery - home of "the perfesser"
Birmingham, AL
 

Steve Sampson
Member
Username: Sampsosm

Post Number: 139
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 129.137.222.62
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm not sure how they determine the AA% of the hops, but this article from Brewing Techniques describes how they test the IBU of the finished beer, seems pretty easy if you have a spectrophotometer and centrifuge.

http://www.brewingtechniques.com/library/backissues/issue7.1/bonham.html

One of the references for this article is the book:

John A. Thord, Ed., Methods of Analysis of the American Society of Brewing Chemists, 8th ed. (ASBC, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1992)

ISBN: 1881696014

I was gonna check out this book, they probably detail how to test the hops, but its still probably not economical.
 

Bill Freeman/ER
Member
Username: Elderrat

Post Number: 104
Registered: 10-2001
Posted From: 66.25.120.113
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 03:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Steve, the two pieces of equipment they list in the BT article take home testing out of the realm of economical. spectrophotometers start around $3 grand....
Bill Freeman aka Elder Rat
KP Brewery - home of "the perfesser"
Birmingham, AL
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 3570
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 71.37.187.47
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 03:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

>>is there any way to determine economically the ibus in home grown hops

If you have money to burn, and a burning curiosity:

http://www.siebelinstitute.com/services/materials.html

Looks like $40 - $75 per analysis. Personally, I am not that curious.
 

Steve Sampson
Member
Username: Sampsosm

Post Number: 140
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 129.137.222.62
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 04:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill

I know, I have access to a spectrophotometer, but it is microplate, not cuvette style, also, the reagent needed isooctane, and octyl alcohol will cost over $100, so I will probably never try it.

I guess just stick to hoppy styles with your "Homegrown".
 

Nick Zeigler
Member
Username: Ziggy

Post Number: 161
Registered: 09-2003
Posted From: 148.244.229.231
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 04:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Carlos - I live in Texcoco and, while I planted late, mine are starting very slowly. TOo much rain I think.
 

OverTheHill
Junior Member
Username: Overthehill

Post Number: 92
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 67.169.18.76
Posted on Friday, August 26, 2005 - 04:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am not sure of this photo-periodic thing...I picked my cascade in late June as they were starting to turn brown (second year). Hot, not enough water, maybe... Ultras picked in late July. Second round of Casacade in early August (not too many). Oh, and wild turkeys like the leaves this time of the year....kind of hard keeping them out since they fly over fences. Mt Hood, Perle and Red vine didn't do too good this year.