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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through December 24, 2005 * From wort to bubbles < Previous Next >

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gregory gettman
Intermediate Member
Username: Gregman

Post Number: 474
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 69.37.122.134
Posted on Monday, December 12, 2005 - 02:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How would someone learn to prime beer ready to bottle or keg with malta goya?

How much would you use for a 5 gallon batch?

Anyone try this?
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 2218
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.215.203.195
Posted on Monday, December 12, 2005 - 02:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Why would you want to prime with Malta Goya?

First you would have to learn what its fermentability is and then calculate what that represents compared to 5 oz of corn sugar. I frankly am having a hard time seeing the point.

Dan

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Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 4134
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Monday, December 12, 2005 - 03:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I agree, but for the sake of speculation Malta Goya is only somewhat fermentable; I'd say about 60 percent. I believe the specific gravity is 1.060 or 14.75 degrees Plato (percent sugar by weight). If 60 percent of that is fermentable, it works out to 8.85 percent fermentable sugar.

The formula for calculating the amount of corn sugar for priming assumes an extract potential of 1.045 (98 percent fermentability of the value of sucrose). For 5 gallons of beer fermented at 68 F to produce 2.5 volumes of CO2, add 4.39 oz. by weight (124.5 grams) of corn sugar. In the case of Malta Goya with only 8.85 percent fermentable sugar, the amount is 22.32 oz. by weight (633 grams). At a specific gravity of 1.060, the amount of Malta Goya by volume is 21 oz. (623 ml).

There, don't you agree it might be easier to use corn sugar.
 

David Lewinnek
Member
Username: Davelew

Post Number: 220
Registered: 02-2005
Posted From: 198.51.251.199
Posted on Monday, December 12, 2005 - 03:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There's a formula in New Complete Joy of Homebrewing for priming beer with wort (look up "gyle" in the index). I believe the formula is

(quarts to add)=(12 * gallons of beer)/((OG-1.000)*1000)

where the OG is the OG of the liquid (canned wort of Malat Goya or whatever) that you're adding.

I recently primed 5 gallons of a 1.050 porter with 1.0 quarts of gyle, which is why I remember the formula. That formula actually suggested 1.2 quarts for my beer, but I like my porters a little less bubbly.

Papazian's formula obviously doesn't take into account fermentability, pre-dissolved CO2, or serving temperature, so it's only an approximate formula.
 

Yam
Junior Member
Username: Yam

Post Number: 76
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 72.240.36.235
Posted on Monday, December 12, 2005 - 05:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would be a little leary of using MG for priming. Although not a huge amount, from Bill's calculations. I would be concerned about flavor contributions in the final product.
 

Sand
Member
Username: Sand

Post Number: 198
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 216.201.45.28
Posted on Monday, December 12, 2005 - 06:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What does malta goya taste like? Is it malty or bitter? Has anyone ever tasted the starters they have made with it?

Sand
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 2027
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.49.148.10
Posted on Monday, December 12, 2005 - 06:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Very sweet and malty. There's some hops there but it's hard for me to taste anything beyond the overpowering sweetness.

Never tasted it after the starter has finished. Got one going now for a Wee Heavy that I'll need to decant and then add more MG to step it up some more. I'll save what I decant and give it a taste.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 4139
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Monday, December 12, 2005 - 07:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The last time I brewed a wee heavy I used two bottles of Malta Goya for the first step of a Wyeast 1728 starter. I sampled the liquid when it fermented out; it was malty with caramel notes, some residual sweetness and only minimal hop presence. The color was at the darker end of the scale but it was still to style. I'm thinking MG would make a quite decent 80 shilling Scottish ale.
 

Patrick C.
Intermediate Member
Username: Patrickc

Post Number: 480
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 12.169.58.91
Posted on Monday, December 12, 2005 - 10:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It reminded me of Amber Bock or Negra Modela. This was from a WLP830 starter, so different yeasts would give a different result. The overpowering sweetness is only there pre-fermentation. My "Malta Beer" was actually rather dry. I think it would be fine for priming a brown ale or anything darker. Perhaps easier than corn sugar if you can figure out how much to add.