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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through August 31, 2006 * Brew class syllabus < Previous Next >

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Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3225
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Wednesday, August 09, 2006 - 10:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am thinking about outlining a brewing class. Roughly I thought that these might be section titles:

Extract Brewing
Mini Mash Brewing
All Grain Brewing
Bottling
Kegging
Recipe Formulation
Trouble Shooting

It would be nice to fold various parts into each other like do an extract beer and bottle a prior batch in the same class.

For all grain brewing I could start a mash and lauter one started earlier perhaps working kegging into it as well.

Mini mashing could be skipped. It takes as long to do as all grain brewing. Its only advantage is maybe less equipment.

Any thoughts?

Dan

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Richard Nye
Senior Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 1518
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 68.4.202.69
Posted on Wednesday, August 09, 2006 - 10:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How about a section on ingredients (hops, barley, other fermentables, yeast and water)?
 

Tom Daniels
Junior Member
Username: Tom_daniels

Post Number: 29
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 69.5.128.166
Posted on Wednesday, August 09, 2006 - 10:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You might do a style/ingredients/process sort of introduction class to start.
Introduce the process at a high level with ingredients, taste a few styles/grains/hops. Then, kick into extract brewing.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4297
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Wednesday, August 09, 2006 - 10:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wort Chilling, Aeration, Pitching and Fermentation as one section

(now don't be giving out any crazy ideas on chilling, Dan)

(Message edited by chumley on August 09, 2006)
 

Tom Daniels
Junior Member
Username: Tom_daniels

Post Number: 30
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 69.5.128.166
Posted on Wednesday, August 09, 2006 - 11:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was thinking about all of those details like Chumley, but I think you will cover all of those several times over by going through the process for both extract and then mashing. Hence, I don't see the need for sessions devoted to them unless you are doing things in very great depth.
 

Graham Cox
Advanced Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 631
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 69.244.192.174
Posted on Wednesday, August 09, 2006 - 11:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't think mini-mashing should be "skipped" entirely. I think there is a sizable subset of the brewing population that may be space-limited and/or equipment limited (as you suggested) that would make the best beer possible via the mini-mash (or "partial-mash") route. Apartment and condo dwellers come to mind.

I know that for me, the partial-mash route was the primrose path that quickly led to all-grain. The reasons for that were twofold: (1) It was the best beer I had made up to that time, and (2) It de-mystified the whole "all-grain is voodoo" mystique.

Beat the drum on proper starters and pitching rate. It's made the biggest single difference of anything in my beer.
 

Patrick C.
Advanced Member
Username: Patrickc

Post Number: 576
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 63.250.179.198
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 11:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ditto the tasting introduction, combined with a discussion of ingredients and what flavors they contribute.
How long would each class be? I think you could get folks to hang around long enough for a full all grain batch, especially if you had the water hot and ready to go at the start of the class. With enough tasting samples, you might even get people to hang around and help clean up.
 

ChriSto
Junior Member
Username: Christo

Post Number: 67
Registered: 02-2006
Posted From: 216.176.226.154
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 12:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Looks good Dan. One year our club did a "Teach a Friend" Day where we brewed an extract and all-grain batch side by side, so you could listen to whichever interested you or both. The back and forth between the two brewers worked great (the extract brewer told jokes during the mashing process, waiting for his "time" to start while the all-grain got in his barbs too on "real" brewing). About half of the group came back to bottle the beer. A month or so later we met for a dinner and enjoyed the fruits of our labor. Gotta do that again one of these days.

We did a series of classes for our BJCP study group this year doing half on ingredients (malt, hops, yeast, water and adjuncts) and half on process (mash & lauter, boil & cooling, fermentation, and sanitation/racking/bottling). Of course there is usually an ingredient question or two on the exam so a lot of time was spent discussing, but I think most brewers would like to know the "source" for their process - probably one class would do on ingredients.

Each of these was a one-hour class, then followed by a style of the month and an off-flavor of the month and how to trouble-shoot. I have 1-2 page syllabi of each topic if you're interested, kind of as a hand-out to folks to take home with them after the brew session.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3226
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 01:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tasting would be a most excellent addition. There could be legal problems with it, especially if a fee were charged for the class. Maybe part of the fee could be to bring a six pack of beer for analysis purposes.

Christo, I would like to see what you have put together.

Dan

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ChriSto
Junior Member
Username: Christo

Post Number: 68
Registered: 02-2006
Posted From: 216.176.226.154
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 01:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The schedule is on our club website
www.hbd.org/sbl/index_files/StudyGroup.htm
We actually borrowed it from the Carolina Brewmasters who in turn borrowed it from the Cascade Brewers Guild - the Guild has several links to each of their talks online. I can email you the syllabus for what I put together for each class separately.
 

Zack
Junior Member
Username: Soverythirsty

Post Number: 33
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 70.20.25.105
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 01:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan,

I think you should seriously consider breaking this into two levels; say, introductory and experienced. Reading your section titles made me cringe, but a new brewer would have enough trouble as it is.

I'd like to see:

Yeast Management
Malt Process and Analysis
Mash Process and Analysis
Water Profiling and Balance
"The 5 -ations of Brewing"
Conditioning
Serving

Then send everyone home to return in 3-4 weeks with product for "peer review."
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3227
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 03:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Idealy I would like to do the class in three nights. Remember that this is a beginners level sort of thing. I would do extract brewing and bottling the first night, all grain brewing and kegging the second with recipe formulation and trouble shooting. Tasting the students beers would help trouble shooting. The third class would be a sort of party as well.

Dan

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Richard Nye
Senior Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 1521
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 68.4.202.69
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 04:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"The 5 -ations of Brewing"

Guess I know less about brewing than I thought. What is that?
 

Ted Grudzinski
Member
Username: Tgrudzin

Post Number: 118
Registered: 08-2003
Posted From: 208.250.29.8
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 06:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I suggest a tasting in the beginning, something like a miller product and then something all malt to explain what corn tastes like. Then explain you are not show how to make a specific commerical beer, but a style of beer. It always bothers me that if you teaching the art of bread making, no one would say " I like Wonder Bread. Can we make that?" There, I feel better. In our area, you can't have 'free tastings'. There has to be some nominal charge. BTW, good luck
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 5794
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 63.114.138.2
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 08:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't see batch sparging listed.....
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3228
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 08:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In Ohio, you need a license to give away or sell beer. There is no such thing as "free beer" in a commercial setting.

During a tour of Miller's Trenton, Ohio, it was explained that corn was no longer being used - they use corn syrup from Cargil.

I would cover variations of mashing and sparging methods, but I would probably only demonstrate fly sparging because it is what I am used to and have the most confidence in.

Dan

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tranquil_liza
Intermediate Member
Username: Tranquil_liza

Post Number: 324
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 69.245.106.189
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 10:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

1. the brewing class is a fine idea.
2. batch sparging should most definitely be included cuz it's so damned easy.
3. the fact that this is thread is "RAT FREE" is amazing.
"How now?? A rat?? Dead, for a ducat, dead"!!!......Shakespeare
 

Ron Siddall
Member
Username: El_cid

Post Number: 132
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 198.135.241.18
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 10:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Liza, are you fishing? Looks like a baited hook to me.
This space open to interpretation
 

Frank Barickman
Junior Member
Username: Bigdog

Post Number: 53
Registered: 07-2003
Posted From: 152.119.116.138
Posted on Friday, August 11, 2006 - 12:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What exactly are the "5 - ations" of brewing?

1-aeration
2-fermentation
3-carbonation

-maturation???
-boil-ation???
-Water-ation???
-Mastac-ation???

(Message edited by bigdog on August 11, 2006)
 

Dave Witt
Advanced Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 879
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 64.53.226.78
Posted on Friday, August 11, 2006 - 01:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Saccarification?
Isomerization?
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 2376
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.49.148.10
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 07:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Don't know about the Ohio laws but I took the Advanced Brewing class through the American Brewers Guild about 10 years ago and we spent a couple of hours tasting beers. Many for examples of flaw flavors. Had the worst oxidized beer ever at that tasting. The samples were included in the cost of the class.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3238
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 08:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

About every other year our brew club, the Bloatarian Brewing League, has "An Evening of Bad Beer." We find good examples of bad beer or doctor a boring beer to simulate problems. Everybody tastes ( sometimes only sniffs) the bad beer and we discuss the nature of the problem how it comes about and maybe what can be done to fix / prevent it.

It is a popular, if not tasty, event!

Dan

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Doug J
Member
Username: Doug_j

Post Number: 227
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 207.250.116.150
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 08:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think you could scrap the mini-mash class too. While you're teaching all-grain you can just briefly explain that some people do a hybrid method and talk about the process.

On the hijack: I don't work at Miller, but it is my understanding that the corn syrup used there is formulated especially for brewing and contains a higher level of unfermentable sugars than generic HFCS, in order to closer replicate corn as an adjunct.
Malam cerevisiam faeceus in cathedram stercoris
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 5810
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 08:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey, Doug, I was under the impression that corn as an adjunct didn't have much in the way of unfermentables. Incorrect?
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Doug J
Member
Username: Doug_j

Post Number: 228
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 207.250.116.150
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 09:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You may have a point there, Denny, but I think that whatever they do to corn syrup to make it "high fructose" would change it's fermentation profile.

Anyway, I do know that they are required to check the bill of lading on delivery and make sure it's the "right" kind of corn syrup, and that was the explanation given to me.

In the times I've used them homebrewing, corn grits ferment out damn near completely, and accidentally gave me an "Imperial" cream ale the first time I used them due to my inexperience.
Malam cerevisiam faeceus in cathedram stercoris
 

JimTanguay
Advanced Member
Username: Pizzaman

Post Number: 602
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 24.18.213.14
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 11:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny, I have often wondered if the mash temps affected corn or rice as far as fermentability.
Does corn just convert to basic corn sugar no matter what in the presence of enzymes?
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3239
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 65.29.220.144
Posted on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 - 01:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Knowing that both corn and rice are largely starch and that enzymes produce sugars of varing length and fermentability, I doubt that all corn or rice would convert to something 100% fermentable all the time without special effort.

Dan

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