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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through December 23, 2006 * Vanilla Bourbon Porter Recipe Request < Previous Next >

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Peter Roman
Advanced Member
Username: Lilbordr

Post Number: 901
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.2.115.11
Posted on Monday, December 11, 2006 - 08:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Greetings,
I am in the mood to make a winter beer and I have decided that I want to make a vanilla bourbon porter. This conclusion was reached after realizing that I like vanilla, bourbon, and porter. The only problem is having to goto three different means in order to enjoy them all. It would seem that this beer would simplify things . I tried searching but it comes back with threads related to vanilla or bourbon. Feel free to post your version of this recipe. In addition any information relating to the preperation of the beans and addition of the bourbon would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
Peter 'the kid' Roman
 

Randy Hamm
Junior Member
Username: Hamm

Post Number: 44
Registered: 10-2006
Posted From: 12.218.128.67
Posted on Monday, December 11, 2006 - 08:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Peter, I got this off the B&V board recently. If I remember correctly, it is Denny Conn's recipe. I have yet to brew it but find it quite interesting. Hope it's what you are looking for.

Peace, Randy

Recipe : Bourbon Vanilla Imperial Porter

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (GAL): 5.00 Wort Size (GAL): 5.00
Total Grain (LBS): 17.00
Anticipated OG: 1.087 Plato: 20.9
Anticipated SRM: 33.4
Anticipated IBU: 34.4
Brewhouse Efficiency: 73 %
Wort Boil Time: 75 Minutes


Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
64.7 11.00 lbs. Pale Malt(2-row) America 1.036 2
8.8 1.50 lbs. Brown Malt Great Britain 1.032 70
14.7 2.50 lbs. Munich Malt(2-row) America 1.035 10
5.9 1.00 lbs. Crystal 120L America 1.034 120
2.9 0.50 lbs. Crystal 40L America 1.034 40
2.9 0.50 lbs. Chocolate Malt America 1.029 350

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
0.80 oz. Magnum Whole 14.60 32.0 60 min.
0.50 oz. Goldings - E.K. Whole 4.75 2.4 10 min.


Extras

Amount Name Type Time
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.00 Tsp Irish Moss Fining 15 Min.(boil)


Yeast
-----

WYeast 1056 Amercan Ale/Chico

Mash Schedule
-------------

Mash Name :
WYeast 1056 Amercan Ale/Chico

Total Grain LBS : 17.00
Grain Temp : 63.00 F
Total Water QTS : 23.00 - Before Additional Infusions
Total Water GAL : 5.75
Tun Thermal Mass : 0.00


Step Rest Start Stop Direct/ Infuse Infuse Infuse
Step Name Time Time Temp Temp Infuse Temp Amount Ratio
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -
sacc 0 60 154 154 Infuse 167 23.00 1.35


Total Water QTS : 23.00 - After Additional Infusions
Total Water GAL : 5.75 - After Additional Infusions


All temperature measurements are degrees Fahrenheit.
All infusion amounts are in quarts.


Notes
-----

After primary, slit open 2 vanilla beans. Scrape the insides, chop the pods into quarters, add to secondary fermenter, rack beer onto vanilla. Taste periodically for the correct balance. I left the beer in secondary for 11 days. Rack to bottling bucket and add 10 ml. per pint of Jim Beam Black Bourbon (or to your taste). Bottle, enjoy!
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6060
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Monday, December 11, 2006 - 08:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The correct amount of chocolate malt is 1.25 lb., not the .5 that's in that recipe.
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Randy Hamm
Junior Member
Username: Hamm

Post Number: 45
Registered: 10-2006
Posted From: 12.218.128.67
Posted on Monday, December 11, 2006 - 09:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny,

Thanks for the chocolate update. I'll change my copy of recipe.

Have a great holiday season, Randy
 

Peter Roman
Advanced Member
Username: Lilbordr

Post Number: 902
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.2.115.11
Posted on Monday, December 11, 2006 - 09:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny,
I would like to make a 10 gallon batch when I do this. Do you think I could manage this in a sankey mash tun if I run the mash on the thick side of things? Also my math for the bourbon is as follows:
10ml = 0.3381402
10 gal * 128 oz = 1280 oz / 16 oz = 80 pints.
There for add .3381402 * 80 = ~27oz of bourbon.
~27oz of bourbon = .8 liters.
Your recipe mentions tossing in the pods after I scrape the white goo out?
Thanks,
Peter 'the kid' Roman
 

Peter Roman
Advanced Member
Username: Lilbordr

Post Number: 903
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.2.115.11
Posted on Monday, December 11, 2006 - 09:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny,
I realized that .01 liters * 80 would have been a lot easier a calculation .
I used promash's strike water calc to determine my theoretical mash capacity. It tells me this:
35# of grain
48.75 Qts
1.39 Qts/lb
Total mash tun volume: 15 gal

Could that work?
Thanks,
Peter 'the kid' Roman
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 6030
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Monday, December 11, 2006 - 10:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Peter, 59.9 quarts of mash (the calculated volume using my spreadsheet) is pushing the envelope in terms of capacity if you're mashing in a converted keg. Why not reduce the mash thickness (to, say, 1.25 quarts of water per pound of grain) in order to give yourself some room for error?
 

Tom Meier
Intermediate Member
Username: Brewdawg96

Post Number: 449
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 74.241.153.231
Posted on Tuesday, December 12, 2006 - 03:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A HB club I'm in recently made 110 gallons of Imperial Porter with a similiar amount of grains, but different grainbill. (I contend that black patent is a basic requirement of all porters)

Most went with 1 qt/lb to leave room in their 15 gal mash tuns. Those people using kegs and false bottoms had several slow runoffs and ~62%-65% efficiencies.. Those people using 60 qt coolers with SS braided hoses batch sparged and had zero problems and 70% efficiency..

If you can find Thomas-Fawcett brown malt, the stuff is just pure HEAVEN.

We are going to age in two Jimmy Bedford autographed Jack Daniel's barrels.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 6034
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Tuesday, December 12, 2006 - 03:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"I contend that black patent is a basic requirement of all porters."

Tom, before I weigh in on this, would you care to elaborate?

(Message edited by BillPierce on December 12, 2006)
 

Tom Meier
Intermediate Member
Username: Brewdawg96

Post Number: 450
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 74.241.153.231
Posted on Tuesday, December 12, 2006 - 04:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill, its just a personal opinion of mine.
Black patent seems to give that hint of ashtray flavor that just works in a porter. BP and chocolate are what define modern porter in my opinion.

Also I could go into a long history of Daniel Wheeler, the roasting drum, and the evolution of modern porter being based singularly on the use of black patent malt.

but I have seen a 2nd BOS recipe that used nothing but 3 lbs chocolate and pale ale malt, so its definitely open to interpretation
 

Tim Copeland
Junior Member
Username: Hammer

Post Number: 61
Registered: 04-2003
Posted From: 64.72.231.130
Posted on Tuesday, December 12, 2006 - 06:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Denny
I have also been looking at this recipe lately and was considering brewing it...I was wondering what flavour characteristics the two crystal malts contribute and whether or not you could get away with one or the other or something in between,....in other words; when you were creating this recipe, was the crystal you used thrown in because it you had it on hand, or because you where shooting for a certain flavour profile?
Thanks
TC
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 6036
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Tuesday, December 12, 2006 - 02:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's an endless debate as to what constitutes both porter and stout, and there is clearly a range of opinions. I'll give you your due for your love of black patent malt, Tom, and say that I am less ecstatic about it. "Hint of ashtray flavor" is an interesting metaphor. I agree that it's acrid and burnt, but I think it's more sharply acidic than the caustic character of ash. At any rate, it's a matter of taste.

I once spent a lot of time fooling with porter recipes, as this was one of my early favorite styles. I finally decided that I liked it better without any black patent malt. My St. Chuck's porter recipe suits me fine, but perhaps I could be persuaded to put no more than 1.5 oz. of black patent back in it and give a try.

I will say that black patent works well in my Old Rasputin clone, which includes quite a bit of brown malt as well. It would clearly not be the beer it is without these malts, but to my mind and taste imperial stout is quite a bit different from porter.

That's the beauty of homebrewing, however. We get to brew it our way.
 

Fritz Eubanks
Junior Member
Username: Fritzeubanks

Post Number: 35
Registered: 05-2003
Posted From: 131.167.50.162
Posted on Tuesday, December 12, 2006 - 05:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tom - I also like a little black patent in a porter. For my best batch to date, I used Bill's St. Chuck's recipe, but cut the Special B to 4 oz., and added 2 oz. of black patent. I also used Safale S-04 yeast.
"What care I how time advances?
I am drinking ale today." - Edgar Allen Poe
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6061
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Tuesday, December 12, 2006 - 05:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Peter, the goo is actually kinda brown/black, not white...not that it matters. Cut the bean in half lengthwise, scrape out the goo, and cut the bean into 3-4 pieces. Add both the bean and goo to the secondary.

Tom, I agree with the BP in theory, at least. My other porters do use abit, but when I tried it in this one, it threw the balance way off.

Tim, both crystals are there for a reason. The 40 for a bit if sweetness, and the 120 for a kinda toasty carmelly bite.
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Peter Roman
Advanced Member
Username: Lilbordr

Post Number: 904
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.2.115.11
Posted on Tuesday, December 12, 2006 - 06:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny,
When I add the goo to seconday, is it going to sink or swim? Should I do something to the goo to allow it to disolve more easily? Does it matter if I cold condition in seconday?
Thanks,
Peter 'the kid' Roman
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6063
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Tuesday, December 12, 2006 - 07:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pete, I put the vanilla bean and goo in the fermenter first, then rack onto it. All the stuff stays on the bottom. I doubt that cold conditioning will have any negative affects.
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Peter Roman
Advanced Member
Username: Lilbordr

Post Number: 905
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.2.115.11
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 02:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny,
Can you recommend a mash thickness? I will be mashing for a 10 gallon batch (~35#) in a sankey. Here is a link to the beans I bought. They shipped yesterday. Did I get bent over on the price?
Thanks,
Peter 'the kid' Roman
 

Chris Vejnovich
Advanced Member
Username: Cjv85vmax

Post Number: 532
Registered: 06-2003
Posted From: 216.96.10.89
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 02:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Peter,

According to the Green Bay Rackers website mashing calculator your 35# with a 1.25qt/lb of strike water the mash should take up about 13.75 gallons of space. I'm guessin you will not be batch sparging this beer though.

Peace out.

BTW, Wayne Faris, a HBer in our local club has made Denny's recipe and it is very good.

Good luck
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6064
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 05:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Peter, use whatever mash thickness works for ya...it really doesn't matter all that much. I started using Trader Joe's vanilla beans this year. Excellent quality and $3 for 2 beans!
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Chris Vejnovich
Advanced Member
Username: Cjv85vmax

Post Number: 533
Registered: 06-2003
Posted From: 216.96.10.89
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 06:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill,

How much "Brown Malt"? I hear a little goes a long way. I am thinking about using say 1-2% Brown Malt in a Baltic Porter that I will be brewing here with in the next few weeks.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 2566
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.49.148.10
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 07:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm brewing 10 gal this weekend too and I'm just replacing a few lbs of the 2 row with 3 lbs of light DME so it will fit in my 14 gal MT.

A little brown malt does go a long way. To me it's like a lighter flavor and lovabond chocolate malt. When I first got some TF brown malt I did a porter with roughly thirds of pale, amber, and brown malts. It took quite a bit of aging for it to be drinkable.
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6065
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 07:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Search the board here for a post by Jim O'Conner on the differences between various maltster's brown malts. One company's brown is another company's amber.....
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4469
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 08:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What brand of brown malt do you use, Denny?
 

Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 2322
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 167.4.1.41
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 09:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have serious doubts that I could notice 1.5 oz of black patent (or ANY other malt 'cept maybe peated) in a stout/porter recipe. You guys are nuts! :-)

$4 for 10 vanilla beans delivered is unbeatable! Nice find. I think I got the same ones last year, but don't remember it being that cheap!

I've made an Old Rasputin clone a few times, but never with brown malt, may have to try that next time I suppose?
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6067
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 09:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chumley, I use Baird. I think....damn, no notes here....
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4470
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 09:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks...I think I will give this recipe a go next year.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 6048
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Wednesday, December 13, 2006 - 10:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chris, my take on Old Rasputin uses a 1.5 lbs. (9 percent) brown malt and 5 oz. (2 percent) black patent. The last time I brewed it I believe I used brown malt from Crisp. I can certainly detect the black patent, but as I said it's not objectionable to me in an RIS. Perhaps, as Hophead suggests, I'm not sure I would notice 1.5 oz. in a porter, but I am sensitive to the flavor and would want to err on the conervative side.

I had a friend who brewed a historical porter with 30 percent brown malt in the grain bill. I was not particularly fond of the result.
 

Paul Muth
Intermediate Member
Username: Pjmuth

Post Number: 275
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 65.1.134.221
Posted on Thursday, December 14, 2006 - 02:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've been reading this thread with great interest and have a question that has been squirreling around in this old brain of mine.

Would there be any benefit in tincturing the vanilla beans in the Bourbon? I'm thinking that the alcohol would allow a greater amount of flavor and aroma to be extracted from the bean pods and pulp.

Yea, I know, I think way too much...
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 6052
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Thursday, December 14, 2006 - 02:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That would be my opinion as well, Paul. Vanilla is more soluble in ethanol than in water. However, people report that Denny's BVIP has just about the right amount of vanilla flavor using his method.
 

Paul Muth
Intermediate Member
Username: Pjmuth

Post Number: 276
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 65.1.134.221
Posted on Thursday, December 14, 2006 - 02:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill,

I just wonder if anyone tried the method - but - you make a great point. With Peter's score on the beans - economizing them is a moot point.

Now if they were the $5.00 a bean type that I've seen in the markets -??
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 2570
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.49.148.10
Posted on Thursday, December 14, 2006 - 06:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There's been posts in the past where people have soaked the beans in the bourbon and then just added that.

I've never used the Baird or Crisp brown malts. The Thomas Fawcett is definately on the stronn side though.

Denny, is the Baird more like an amber malt or simular to the TF? I've alway used the wrong (1/2 lb) amount in the BVIP and don't want to overdo things by upping it to the 1.25 lb amount if it's stronger than what you use.
 

Tom Meier
Intermediate Member
Username: Brewdawg96

Post Number: 458
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 70.157.39.14
Posted on Friday, December 15, 2006 - 05:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK, I give... I couldn't find the brown malt comparison, Denny.. two nights looking for it..

Can anyone help me sniff this out?

I use brown malt all the time, and would like to see the details of what he discovered.
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6068
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Friday, December 15, 2006 - 05:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've got Jim's letter on another computer, but I won't be able to get to it til next week. I'll post the info then.

Sure, I suppose you could "tincture" the beans in the bourbon, but that takes more effort and it works great the way I do it, so why bother?
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Peter Roman
Advanced Member
Username: Lilbordr

Post Number: 906
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 75.176.13.104
Posted on Sunday, December 17, 2006 - 02:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Promash lies. Promash told me that I could mash 35.5# of grain with 48qts of water resulting in 14.9 gal of total mash volume. I thought that didn't sound right so I used 11 gal of strike water instead. By the time I was down to doughing in the last few pounds of grain I was already at the rim of my sankey mash tun. Thank god my HERMS coil is big because I had to run mash water through it to lower the tun water level to get the rest of the gain in. I swear; after brewing enough one must develope an instinct that is more accurate than any software. The porter is bubbling away nicely due to a big starter and the use of pure O2. Thank everyone for all the help in forumulating this recipe.
Cheers,
Peter 'the kid' Roman
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 6073
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Sunday, December 17, 2006 - 04:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Peter, according to my copy of ProMash, 35.5 lbs. of grain and 48 quarts of strike water (a mash thickness of 1.35 quarts per pound) will result in a total mash volume of 14.84 gal. If you reduce the strike water to 44 quarts (1.24 quarts, the calculated mash volume is 13.84 gallons. That seem pretty accurate to me.

The volume of a Sankey keg is 15.5 gallons. I don't know what you use to filter the mash (e.g. stainless braid or a false bottom), but this reduces the total volume. In the case of my Sabco-type false bottom, I consider the useful maximum volume of the mash as 14 gallons.

(Message edited by BillPierce on December 17, 2006)
 

Peter Roman
Advanced Member
Username: Lilbordr

Post Number: 908
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.2.115.11
Posted on Monday, December 18, 2006 - 04:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill,
I got the same identical calculations using promash. I instinctually use 44 qts instead of the proposed 48. I barely fit the grain in. Thank god for my HERMS system subtracting enough volume to allow me to fit the rest in. My mash tun should hold at least 15 gal. I don't understand why reality differed from promash to such a large extent. Oh well. The brew session was a successful one and that's what matters in the end. Thanks to everyone that helped out by participating in this discussion.
Cheers!
Peter 'the kid' Roman
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 2573
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.49.148.10
Posted on Monday, December 18, 2006 - 04:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was to within an inch of the top of my 14 gal MT even with converting some of the 2 row to 3 lbs of light DME. Made a note to go with 4 lbs of DME next time and reduce the 2 row even more.

Man, must have been a long weekend. I can't remember chocolate from brown malt aparently. I used the full amounts of both so we'll see how it comes out.

Denny, please post Jim's info. I vaguely remember it but now I'm curious and couldn't find it by Googling B&V either.

(Message edited by vancebarnes on December 19, 2006)
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 6080
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Monday, December 18, 2006 - 05:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Peter, as I said, I consider the useful capacity of my converted keg MLT to be 14 gallons. Perhaps you can fit in a little more than that, but I like to avoid the potential mess.
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6073
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Monday, December 18, 2006 - 05:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vance, I spaced it today when I was at the correct com[uter. I'll try for tomorrow.
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Richard Nye
Senior Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 1910
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 68.4.202.69
Posted on Tuesday, December 19, 2006 - 05:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny,
Hey, I just did a search on BVIP and found this thread:

http://hbd.org/discus/messages/20001/25090.html

In it the BVIP recipe you posted 1/2 pound of chocolate malt, not the 1.25 pounds you mention above. Which is it? and why did you the other recipe say 1/2 pound?
 

Graybeard
New Member
Username: Graybeard

Post Number: 6
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 71.229.137.16
Posted on Tuesday, December 19, 2006 - 03:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for posting that, Richard. I was about to ask the same question. I have the recipe, posted by Denny, in the link you reference.
 

Peter Roman
Advanced Member
Username: Lilbordr

Post Number: 909
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.2.115.11
Posted on Tuesday, December 19, 2006 - 03:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny,
I was wondering what final gravity I should be expecting from this beer. I mashed as close to 155F as I could keep it. The beer is finishing out today and I want to make sure it doesn't over attenuate.
Thanks!
Peter 'the kid' Roman
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6078
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Tuesday, December 19, 2006 - 04:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I guess that year I cut back on the chocolate...all I know is that most of the recipes I looked back through, and brew these days, are with the 1.25 lb.

Peter, I don't recall the exact FG, but I think it's somewhere in the low-mid 20s.

Here's the message I received from Jim about the brown malt....

Hi Denny,

Thought I'd give you a heads up on something. A while back I was asking about Baird brown malt, and whether it was really brown and not amber since the sack indicated both "brown" and "amber" (55-70L). Weird. The folks at Baird told me that it could be either brown or amber depending on what the customer wanted it to be, that the two malts are interchangeable. B.S! Anyway, I purchased some Crisp amber malt (35L) from Greg Beron at Culver City Homebrew in So. Cal., and it is visibly identical to Baird. Furthermore, I just received some Thomas Fawcett brown malt from North Country Malt and it is easily, visibly darker then the Baird. I mention this to you because if you're getting your brown malt through the LHBS, and he gets it from Steinbart' is Baird amber malt that is mislabeled. If you saw this Thomas Fawcett brown malt, it would be obvious. Makes me mad since I just kegged a porter brewed with the Baird amber, thinking/hoping it was brown malt.

When I placed my order with North Country, Brian told me they are in the "very early" stages of swinging some kind of deal with Great Western. North Country will sell Great Western on the East Coast, and Great Western will sell some of North Country's malts on the West Coast.

Jim
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 2582
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.49.148.10
Posted on Tuesday, December 19, 2006 - 10:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, my BVIP may need a little exta aging as I upped the chocolate to 1.25 lb and used the same amount of TF brown this time. The hydrometer sample tasted pretty good though.
 

Peter Roman
Advanced Member
Username: Lilbordr

Post Number: 911
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.2.115.11
Posted on Wednesday, December 20, 2006 - 01:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny,
I checked the gravity last night and I was at 1.030 with signs of it finishing off. I'll see if I can check it at lunch. The question now is, since I'm leaving to go back to Albany Friday night, how can I go about secondarying this thing? Should I rack to secondary tomorrow night and add the beans? I'm affraid by the time I get back the beer will have been overpowered by the beans. If this is a possibility, should I tincture the beans in the bourbon allowing me to add the resulting mix as a concentrate? This method would allow me to control the ammount of flavor. Any suggestions?
Thanks,
Peter 'the kid' Roman
 

Peter Roman
Advanced Member
Username: Lilbordr

Post Number: 912
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.2.115.11
Posted on Wednesday, December 20, 2006 - 04:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slight change in plans. My grandmother passed this morning at 8:37AM. I will be leaving tonight at 9PM. Denny, can I rack this thing to secondary before I go or should I leave it in primary? I'll be gone from now til new years day.
Thanks,
Peter 'the kid' Roman
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6082
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Wednesday, December 20, 2006 - 04:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Peter, my condolences for your grandmother.

If you rack and add the vanilla before you go, it should be done and ready to bottle/keg with the bourbon by the time you get back. 11 days-2 weeks on the beans seems to be fine. But you can also just leave it in primary and deal with it when you get back if that's easier.
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Peter Roman
Advanced Member
Username: Lilbordr

Post Number: 913
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 75.176.13.104
Posted on Wednesday, December 20, 2006 - 05:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Gravity is still at 1.030. Wonder why that is? I'll rack and pitch the beans. The beans I got are tahitian, not bourbon (see ebay link up top). Hope that doesn't make a big difference.
Thanks,
Peter 'the kid' Roman
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6083
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Wednesday, December 20, 2006 - 05:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If it's still 1.030, I'd leave it alone. There's no reason to rush it.
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Brew Mot
New Member
Username: Brewmot

Post Number: 4
Registered: 12-2006
Posted From: 71.135.42.202
Posted on Friday, December 22, 2006 - 04:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny,

What is your experience in of aging this beer? Specifically aging in a bottle and a lingering sticky sweetness. I made a brown ale that has a similar grain bill. 3 weeks in the bottle it has an exaggerated sweetness, sort of a mellow sugar from fruit (banana?) kind of sweetness.

My OG was about 1.072 and bottled it at 1.018. I am not real worried. I understand it might take some time for it to smooth out.

brewmot
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6089
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 64.28.53.40
Posted on Friday, December 22, 2006 - 09:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My experience with this beer is that it's MUCH better young than aged. Aging it more than a couple months seems to really kill the flavors.
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.