Topics Topics Help/Instructions Help Edit Profile Profile Member List Register  
Search Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Visit The Brewery's sponsor!
Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2009 * Archive through January 24, 2009 * Prophetic Words < Previous Next >

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
  ClosedClosed: New threads not accepted on this page        

Author Message
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 2352
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 24.248.74.254
Posted on Friday, January 16, 2009 - 08:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Recently, Graham said:

"Being a superior pilot doesn't just require possessing superior flying skills. It requires superior judgment to keep you out of those situations that would require you to exercise your superior flying skills."

Graham, I just want to say out loud how much everyone appreciates all the hard work, dedication, and training you pilots and flight crews put in. Yesterday's forced water-landing brought out the best in Captain Chesley B. “Sully” Sullenberger. Here's to hoping you never have to exercise YOUR superior flying skills.

-Bob
 

Dave Witt
Senior Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 1236
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 68.57.245.38
Posted on Friday, January 16, 2009 - 10:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Amen!
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 9850
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 12:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, here was a case where the systems, both human and machine, worked together as they were designed to ensure safety and prevent the loss of life.

I'll drink to that any time!
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2052
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 208.54.95.184
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 01:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for that, Bob - "uneventful" is my favorite word when it comes to flying.

I'm flying a trip now, and several people have asked me what I thought of the whole incident. My answer: "I'm glad it wasn't me!"

Regarding the reporting, don't forget, there were two pilots in that cockpit. Sullenberger's getting well-deserved kudos for his actions, but he wasn't alone in getting that thing down safely. It seems like everybody has forgotten that there was a first officer there, who could have been flying the plane for some or all of the incident - I haven't seen anything definitive that says he wasn't. Regardless, he most assuredly was assisting the captain through the event - whoever was flying surely had their hands full.

At any rate, it was a heroic action by the crew and the controllers who tried to help, the rescue personnel that responded so rapidly, and the passengers themselves for not panicking and creating a stampede that would have most certainly resulted in more injury or even death. "Divine intervention" is a phrase that comes to my mind. It truly is a miracle that no one was killed.
 

dhacker
Senior Member
Username: Dhacker

Post Number: 1603
Registered: 11-2002
Posted From: 74.177.60.150
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 02:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't know what surprises me more . . the actual number of bird strikes that occur, or just how vulnerable the fan blades on modern jets are. It was reported that the US Airways A320 hit a flock of geese. I know the manufacturers test them for water and ice ingestion, and a flock of geese pack a pretty healthy wad of mass, but ABC news dot com had a bird strike video from You Tube showing a single bird causing a catastrophic engine failure on a plane departing from Manchester England.

When you consider how many flight hours are logged each day, and how many "foreign" objects there are floating around, especially during takeoff when the engine is spooled to max, seems like it would be sucking all sorts of debris into the intake and the number of engine incidents would be substantially more.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 6438
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 65.29.223.32
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 03:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

General Electric has a test facility near Cincy at Peebles, Ohio. They shoot dead chickens at the engines. Maybe they need to switch to geese.
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 2353
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 67.191.162.214
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 05:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

On T.V. I've seen the slow-mo clips of them doing what Dan just said. It's pretty cool to watch in a clinical environment, but Canada geese have the body mass of a small dog. Not a toy dog, but more like a Benji, or Toto. Throw a couple of those in the intake and you're gonna have serious issues.
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 7129
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2009 - 04:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Graham, you'll be happy to know that on NPR this morning they acknowledged the entire crew by name.