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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2009 * Archive through March 01, 2009 * Oxygen in the secondary. < Previous Next >

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Daniel Bishop
New Member
Username: Whatshisface

Post Number: 1
Registered: 01-2009
Posted From: 198.91.4.14
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 - 03:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, all. I am brand new to the board so forgive me if I am asking a question that has already been asked. I just found out the hard way that my transfer pump had a small hole in it and it filled my wort with oxygen as I transferred it to the secondary fermenter. Needless to say I worried about it all night and decided to force carbonate this morning. The yeast was no longer active and the final gravity was where it should be. So is this batch ruined or will I just have to wait and see?
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 2377
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 67.191.162.214
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 - 04:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Welcome to the Monkey House. I wouldn't worry too much. Are we talking frothy foamy bubbles? Or just a few here and there. If it was just a small amount of air, short-term you should be just fine.
 

Daniel Bishop
New Member
Username: Whatshisface

Post Number: 2
Registered: 01-2009
Posted From: 198.91.4.14
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 - 04:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It was definately "frothy foamy bubbles".
 

Cory K.
Member
Username: Galaxy51

Post Number: 235
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 168.103.42.64
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 - 05:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You could add a little sanitized sugar water and let the yeast ferment the oxygen/sugar combination. Basically that is what happens when homebrewers bottle their beer. The oxygen that is absorbed by the beer during transfer to the bottle is used by the active yeast cells together with added sugar to carbonate the bottles.
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 2379
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 67.191.162.214
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 - 05:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How does it taste now? Do you keg? Or do you bottle condition? If you keg, I would recommend just drinking it as is, but remember, time is not your friend in this case.

If you bottle condition, I would try Cory's recommendation.
 

Richard Nye
Senior Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 2196
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 150.202.8.1
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 - 06:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I believe the oxygen reacts quickly with beer to skunk it (remember the college days when you sampled the half barrel the next morning?). If the air skunked the beer, you would know it by tasting it.
 

Daniel Bishop
New Member
Username: Whatshisface

Post Number: 3
Registered: 01-2009
Posted From: 198.91.4.14
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 - 06:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Iíve already got it in a keg under 15lbs of pressure. As far as taste; itís okay but I wish I could let it mellow for a couple of weeks. Unfortunately, it doesnít look like I have that option. This was my first All Grain and it was turning out pretty good until now. Iíve been brewing extracts for about 4 years and have been pretty fortunate in not having any problems. I guess my luck was bound to run out sooner or later.
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 2381
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 67.191.162.214
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 - 06:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Richard, "Skunking" comes from beer being light-struck. I believe what you are meaning to say is the beer gets a cardboard flavor from oxidization.

From BJCP here are the off-flavors associated with oxidation:

Initially:
Cardboard, paper, wet paper, stale bread crumbs, pineapple

Later over time:
sherry-like, leathery, woodsy
 

Dave Witt
Senior Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 1238
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 68.57.245.38
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2009 - 02:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Why are you pumping fermented beer? That opens you up to things like this. Good old gravity or pushing with CO2 are my first choices.

<edit- I forgot, welcome to B&V.

(Message edited by davew on January 23, 2009)
 

Richard Nye
Senior Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 2197
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 68.111.68.20
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2009 - 03:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes Bob, you're right. I guess I was using my college terminology
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 2383
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 67.191.162.214
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2009 - 03:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's ok Richard. I tend to leave the geeky topics to the likes of Graham, Bill, Vance & Denny. But this was low hanging fruit.
 

Andy Hancock
Member
Username: Ahancbrew1

Post Number: 243
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 192.55.54.37
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2009 - 09:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was siphoning beer into a keg about a month ago. I stepped out of the room to do something and when I came back all the beer was in the keg plus any air that also got sucked in.

I donít taste any of the off flavors Bob listed, but the beer is very bland. The beer is a small Pale Ale (OG 1.040) with Ĺ ounce of Cascade for flavor (15 min.) and 1 ounce at the end of the boil.

Could the addition of air cause the lack of flavor or are the hop pellets to blame?
 

Tony Legge
Intermediate Member
Username: Boo_boo

Post Number: 417
Registered: 05-2005
Posted From: 72.139.4.145
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2009 - 10:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No bittering hops?

Not much hops for flavour for an APA and only for 15 minutes won't get much of that in there also.

Next brew try using more hops for a longer boil, say 20 to 30 minutes.

Are you using any kind of software to construct your recipies?
 

ScottDeW
Advanced Member
Username: Scott

Post Number: 565
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 128.129.13.2
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2009 - 01:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Daniel,

Unless you plan to store the beer for a long period of time, I would not worry about it. An experienced BCJP judge might pick up hints of oxidation after the beer has conditioned for a while but most people would not.

My advice (and you can see there are plenty of opinions on this fine resource) is to continue with your original plan and enjoy your beer.

Scott
http://texanbrew.com
 

Andy Hancock
Member
Username: Ahancbrew1

Post Number: 244
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 134.134.139.71
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2009 - 02:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry Tony,

I also added 1 ounce of Cascade at 60 minutes. IBUs were expected to be about 31. The bitterness is fine, but not much flavor or aroma.

Andy
 

Daniel Bishop
New Member
Username: Whatshisface

Post Number: 4
Registered: 01-2009
Posted From: 198.91.4.14
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2009 - 05:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow, lots of advice and it all seems to add up to "Don't Panic", so I won't. Thank you all for the nice welcome, I am looking forward to reading and posting here in the future.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 3565
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 74.7.7.66
Posted on Monday, January 26, 2009 - 04:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Andy,

oxidation can lead to hop flavor and aroma fading fast. Not sure if that's your problem. If you've brewed the same recipe in the past and it seemed to have had more hop presence than the current batch I'd say yes.

Yes, Bob you beat me to the low hanging fruit
 

Andy Hancock
Member
Username: Ahancbrew1

Post Number: 245
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 134.134.139.71
Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2009 - 11:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Vance,

It's the 1st time I made this recipe, but it is the same hop schedule I used to use for my SNPA clone which has an OG that's 10 points higher. I expected this to be more hoppy.

I'll make the recipe again and try not to oxidize it.
 

francisco hott
New Member
Username: Frano

Post Number: 18
Registered: 09-2008
Posted From: 200.72.191.220
Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2009 - 03:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have got a question, I was told that below 27ļC the oxygen dissolves and the oxidation is nearly none, is it true?, what are the opinions or experience,
Daniel I have got a little hole in my siphon, and I have never paid much attention to it an my beers have come out ok (at least it what I believe)
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2068
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2009 - 03:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dissolves into what? It can't just disappear.

Up to a point, gasses go into solution more efficiently in cool liquids than warm, so the level of oxygen in solution would tend to increase as the temperature dropped, given an equivalent level of exposure.

Perhaps what your source is thinking is that chemical reactions tend to happen faster at warmer temperatures. That doesn't mean they come to a screeching halt below 27C.

Oxygen exposure is bad for beer, period, no matter what the temperature.