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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2011 * Archive through March 01, 2011 * Gas leak in corny < Previous Next >

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Nephalist
Intermediate Member
Username: Nephi

Post Number: 444
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 71.129.33.70
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 - 06:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've never had a gas leak before. If I fill the corny to 10 psi, the pressure will be almost gone in 30 minutes. There's no visible liquid leak, so the leak must be the gas in side, right? I've tried charging the keg and leaving the connector attached as well as unattached. It leaks both ways. Actually as I type this I realize it could be a bad o-ring for the keg lid. The keg will be empty soon, but I wonder what I would have done if I wanted to fix this right away. Swap out the gas-in post? Replace all the o-rings?

(Message edited by nephi on February 02, 2011)
 

Tom Gardner
Senior Member
Username: Tom

Post Number: 1217
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 67.177.226.129
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 - 06:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Spray it with soapy water to find the leak first.
 

Paul Edwards
Senior Member
Username: Pedwards

Post Number: 2041
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 76.252.27.197
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 - 12:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Like Tom said...

It could either be the poppet valve inside the gas-in post, the lid o-ring, or the pressure relief valve in the lid.
 

Jeff Stein
Junior Member
Username: Steinie

Post Number: 78
Registered: 07-2010
Posted From: 71.230.45.202
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 - 01:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In addition to your keg, check your connections in your gas line as well as your gas line. I recently had same issue. Turned out not to be the keg, but a small tear in my gas line under the clamp.
 

Jonathan White
Junior Member
Username: Jonathanwhite

Post Number: 59
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 74.182.33.208
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 - 06:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I use StarSan in a spray bottle to check for leaks. It foams real well, I've always got the spray bottle sitting around and whatever gets sprayed also gets sanitized.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 12547
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.49.181
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 - 07:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

+1 for using a spray bottle of Star San solution to check for gas leaks. The foaming is a big help for this application.
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2651
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 208.54.95.210
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 - 11:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've recently had two of the three Paul mentioned. ($$) I was very surprised that the poppet in the gas-in valve could be the culprit, but it was. The other was the screw-on type pressure relief valve, which was loose and I didn't discover it until it was too late.

I love kegs, but the more I get and the more I use them, the more ways I discover that they can fail. Unfortunately each lesson tends to cost a couple of gallons of beer (and a big mess) or a CO2 fill-up.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 4094
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 24.99.147.250
Posted on Friday, February 04, 2011 - 04:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The big mess is usually a leak on the beer out side as I experianced recently. I'd much rather have a CO2 leak.
 

Rob Farrell
Advanced Member
Username: Robf

Post Number: 590
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 216.27.76.200
Posted on Saturday, February 05, 2011 - 12:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

After having leaking relief valves and poppets screw me with empty CO2 tanks and beer on the floor, I started a spreadsheet to track the replacement of all poppets, relief valves, and O-rings, as well as pressure tests, on all of my kegs. I also try to keep a few spares on hand.

This is based on the theory that new parts don't leak. We'll see.
 

Paul Edwards
Senior Member
Username: Pedwards

Post Number: 2043
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 76.252.3.76
Posted on Saturday, February 05, 2011 - 01:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When I clean kegs, I remove the poppets from the posts and inspect them as part of the process. For the kegs I have it's easy to remove the poppets. When I reassemble, the poppets re-seat themselves when I re-attach the posts to the keg. I also don't mix parts from one keg to another keg.

Back when I acquired my kegs, Foxx still sold direct, so I bought enough spare poppets, nylon flare washers, and lid O-rings to last me a while. My wife says it's a "lifetime supply"

So far it is...

I've only needed to replace the pressure relief valves once or twice. I also had a spare of those, and have replenished the stock with parts from the LHBS. (I'm a retired systems engineer that used to work on military aircraft avionics programs. I like redundancy, back up systems and spares.)

Also, when I clean kegs, I use CO2 to push the sanitizer from one keg to the next, leaving the kegs clean and pressurized. Before I go to fill a keg, I use the relief valve to let out the pressure so I can get the lid off. That way I know the keg is still holding pressure. Then I rack the beer into the keg, install the lid, then pressurize to seat the O-ring.

Knocking on wood, it's worked so far.

"To an optimist, the glass is half full, to a pessimist, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be."

(Message edited by pedwards on February 05, 2011)
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 4100
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 24.99.147.250
Posted on Sunday, February 06, 2011 - 02:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rob,

I keep a log book of all my kegs and fermentors. Sure helps when you have an issue you're trying to track down.
 

michael atkins
Advanced Member
Username: Mga

Post Number: 812
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 209.181.159.64
Posted on Sunday, February 06, 2011 - 05:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Like most of us I have had a keg in the rotation that has failed.

I try very hard to keep my kegs reliable, but once the decision is made to fill and use the keg I now accept that "Murphy's Law" will set in and anything can go wrong. I have been around the barn a few times on this issue and have now changed my operating procedure of my CO2 management. In short I keep the CO2 tank turned on at the main top faucet, but but keep the "on-off" regulator shut most of the time. I only turn it on briefly if I need more dispensing power. I just goose it until the tanks sound full and shut it off immediately a second or so later.

I have two units, each with it's own CO2 tank. A single tap kegerator, and a lagering - dispensing fridge that has three cobra taps. The CO2 at various times might not be exactly to style but it sure saves on refilling empty tanks. It is comforting to know that if I do have a problem with the system it is due to a leaky keg and I will not loose my entire gas supply.

There are those times when I know that a keg is not working right. I now just let it go until the keg is done. Fixing it later without beer in it is a lot easier. It's also surprising to me how long the beer keeps an acceptable level of carbonation even if one of the kegs in the rotation is faulty.