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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2003 * September 2, 2003 * 1st major injury < Previous Next >

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JimTanguay (67.27.41.178)
Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2003 - 09:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well I finaly went and hurt myself real bad. Hose came of sparge bucket and 190 degree water pours out onto to my ankle peeling the skin back. At least I got 10 gallons oatmeal stout at 8+ abv going in my fermentors
 

Corey Rector (63.145.92.133)
Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2003 - 09:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ouch!
 

Walt Fischer (24.221.196.114)
Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2003 - 10:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

yikes!!! hope youre ok man!!
Glad to see you have your priorities straight though... 10 gallons of stout!

Walt
----
 

Chris Colby (66.25.197.116)
Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2003 - 11:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Jim,
I feel your pain . . . or at least I felt it. While brewing a couple years ago, I poured some just-boiled water on one of my feet. I had to untie and remove my shoe while the water kept scalding me. Then, when I flung my sock off, a bunch of skin went with it. Ouch.

I'm not a medical doctor, but -- having been through a bad scald -- I can mention two items that will help you. Get some "second skin" gel bandages. The gel bandages will keep the scald protected and keep the affected area from drying out, a big problem with burns and scalds. Also, get some Dermaplast anesthetic spray for the pain.

Finally, if your scald is bigger than the palm of your hand, you should get it checked out by a doctor. At least, that's what I read a couple days after I got scalded. At the time, however, I told my wife I was fine and hopped around on one foot for the rest of the brew day.

And yes, I AM an idiot.

Chris Colby
Bastrop, TX
 

Doug E. Fresh (64.26.199.113)
Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2003 - 11:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry to hear about your injury. That really sucks. Luckily the worst I've done so far was to hit the side of my leg with a pot full of just-flamed-out wort causing a little blistering and plenty of pain. I've burned my hands plenty of time too. I was just thinking the other day commercial brewmasters must get burned all the time. I know when I worked in a deli I was always burning myself on the soup cookers and pizza wrapping machines. Food service is a tough job.
 

Patrick Hower (63.184.48.171)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 12:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dude, I feel your pain. About a month ago, I decided to place my left hand on my converted sabco that had been heating (without water, doohh) for ~1 minute. The resulting burn and blistering is what named that beer. For it is now known as "One Handed Pale"
 

cdb (24.61.151.131)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 01:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

doh! Hope you're ok...I pressed the "fish-belly white" part of my upper arm against a hot grill once...thought I saw God.

-cdb
 

Jeff McClain (206.207.77.117)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 03:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ouch.

I was burnt on the right check, just to the left of my eye by the glowing red hot part of a 5/8" compression nut that had just popped off a section of copper tubing I was de-sweating using very hot Mapp gas. It only grazed me, but it sure did burn. I walked into work for the next week with a hex outline burn on my face.

-Jeff
 

Ed Jones (65.60.143.219)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 12:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Burns are nasty themselves, but it's the high risk of infection that comes after that really sucks. When I was in high school, I was burning some brush with gasoline (STUPID!) and ended up making daily trips to the burn ward for 2 weeks to get new dressings and to debride (sp?) the burns. I was not allowed to go to school (oh damn) due to infection risks.

If you have a burn bad enough to peel the skin off, I'd recommend seeing a doctor for a good dressing and some anti-bacterial ointment.

Ed
 

Drew Avis (209.226.137.106)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 01:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What a great thread! At a big brew 2 years ago, I disconnected the hose from the tun to the kettle after the wort started to boil - only to find out I had left the kettle valve open, and got a nice stream of boiling wort across my hand and upper arm. Just 3rd degree burns, though, nothing serious like some of you guys. My pride was hurt more, because being a big brew, there were 6 or 7 guys standing around watching and helping "the experienced brewer".
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 01:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Burns are one of the major risks of brewing and the number one cause of injuries to commercial brewers. For homebrewers the leading cause is cuts from broken glass, with burns a close second.

When I did a brewpub apprenticeship, the second day on the job I was lifting a hose that had just been used for boiling water to sanitize a fermenter. I flipped the end of the hose to drape it over a storage hook, sending hot water onto my shoulder and down my back. Fortunately my t-shirt caught most of the water and I very quickly took it off. The only injury was a reddening of the skin but it taught me a valuable lesson I never forgot.

Brewing is not the safest occupation. Commercial brewers face hot liquids and surfaces, strong chemicals and even CO2 concentrations that can displace the air in the lungs. Over the years I have had several burns (all of them minor), a couple of skin contacts with caustics and acids, and two cracked ribs from a very stupid incident where I was caught in the doorway of a serving tank. There is a strong argument not to drink while brewing.
 

davidw (209.107.44.126)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 01:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill returns!!
 

Michael (24.88.129.188)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 01:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Don't stand in front of your immersion chiller while "sanitizing" it in your wort during the last few minutes of the boil.

At least if you do, make sure there's no residual water in the tubing from your last batch.

"Crotch Blast Kolsch"

Or, maybe the other lesson is to get a counter-flow.
 

scott jackson (209.107.56.130)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 03:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If ribs are there to protect your inards, why do they hurt so freakin' much after doing their job?

The follwoing incident did not happen to me, but I was there so I will report it. A friend of mine was doing a "stien beer" (where rocks are heated until they glow red and then added to the wort to boil it). To heat the rocks up, he built a huge fire, then let it burn down and placed the rocks inside, anchored with wire so he could pull them out. Then he puts a fan on the fire to make it even hotter. I bet you think you know where the injury will be, don't you? Well, we get the rocks out and put in the wort just fine, and it boils for 45 minutes just off the heat from the rocks. Then as we were getting the rocks out and putting the wort chiller in, someone knocked off the stopper in the bottom of the pot and hot wort started to pour out on the ground. I suppose my friend was thinkng about all those hours of work pouring out onto the ground, or maybe he had one too many beers, but he STICKS HIS FINGER IN THE HOLE to stop the wort from pouring out. It worked, we got another stopper inserted, but his finger suffered second degree burns.
 

PalerThanAle (65.168.73.62)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 04:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

... and doing so, saved the entire Dutch town.

Man, that had to hurt. Sometimes reflexes are not for your own safety. I dropped a knife and instinctly grabbed at it so it wouldn't hit my foot. There are some neat white things in your hands that make your fingers move.

PTA
 

Andrew Pearce (216.160.193.235)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 04:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok, I have to be honest.
I've had a few burns on the shins from backing into my burner, but for 4 months now I've been nursing a pulled abdominal muscle from a double batch brew session hauling full kettles and carboys around all day. Always lift by bending your knees.
Now they tell me.

I've gotta build a stand.

--Andrew
 

Jeff McClain (137.201.242.130)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 05:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is better than "Farm Accidents Video Day" in ag class back in high school...grin.

-Jeff
 

JimTanguay (67.24.56.199)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 05:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill's right again. I used to laugh at those threads were people didn't drink while brewing. Maybe no more 7am brews for me!
 

Walt Fischer (24.221.196.114)
Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 10:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Accidents suck, no doubt there..
But i still laugh at people who dont drink while brewing...;>

Walt
----
 

Mike Kidulich (66.67.219.144)
Posted on Thursday, August 14, 2003 - 12:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I had to attend an electrical safety class several years ago at work. The highlight (using the term loosely) was the video. Seven clips, all footage of people being electrocuted by doing something really stupid. So, I'm really careful at work around high voltage RF stuff. But, I still drink when I brew. Brewing without a homebrew in hand just isn't right. It aids the relaxation process, and you can't make good beer if you're not relaxed;-)

(I do try to wait until 10:00 or so before I hit the taps. Unless I'm just checking carbonation levels)
 

Jim Keaveney (205.188.208.73)
Posted on Thursday, August 14, 2003 - 03:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i agree. need a brew while i am bbq'ing also. and when working around the house, talking on the phone, using the computer, shaving, eating, etc.
 

chumley (63.227.170.41)
Posted on Friday, August 15, 2003 - 09:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've never had an injury in 13 years of brewing, other than a sore back the next day after carrying too many full carboys up and down the stairs. The damage done to the house from spills, however, is quite another story (and best told from my wife's perspective). :)
 

Joseph Michael Alf (67.243.14.161)
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 02:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When I first read this post I thought the same,[only three years though]. Then yesterday, I was emptying a carboy of the last few drops of sanitizer when I just tapped the corner of my outdoor freezer/fermenter,the thing shattered and fell on my arm. It took eight stitches in one gash and four in another.Beware of glass,it can be extremely fickle,strong or brittle even in beer bottles off the line. I'm going to brew an Alt tommorow, fifth time for Alf Alt [a blue Ribbon winner], I'll name this batch V Alt for the scar I got prepping it.
One more thing as this is my first time chiming in here,I really get alot out of this group and love reading all the posts. Thanks Y'all.
 

Kent Fletcher (206.170.107.30)
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 02:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My stupid brewer's burn happened before I started using a pump. I had a picninc cooler for my HLT and Mash/Lauter Tun, with a Sanke kettle. HLT sitting at 7 feet. Climbed up to check the temp, dropped the dial thermometer in and reached right in after it, half way to my elbow in 170ish degree water. Worlds fastest thermometer retrieval, I can tell ya!

And by the way, a burn with only reddening and pain is a FIRST degree burn not a third. A third degree burn is charred flesh, tissue destroyed.
 

Jared Cook (12.237.202.50)
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 06:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

as I was trying to dump 170+º sparge water into my HLT my hand slipped and I spilled it onto my arm and my mid section. That really hurt. Luckily it only ended up being like a sunburn, but I was quickly reminded to be more careful.

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