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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2003 * September 2, 2003 * Cider out on a limb < Previous Next >

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Jeff McClain (206.207.77.117)
Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2003 - 03:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have been wanting to do a hard cider for a while (actually, my wife said if I really wanted to brew something she might like, I could try matching Ace Pear Cider...sigh). Anyway, I did a little research and found a ton of conflicting comments/instructions. Some emphatically saying boil to kill native yeasts, some saying don't, the native yeasts are the best ferment. Some saying you can't use pasteurized, some actually preferring it. Some saying use beer yeast, some wine, some champagne.

Anyway, I finally just decided that the best way to figure it out was to write up my own recipie and try it out.

So, I got the following together:

4 gallons Apple Cider (no preservatives, but it had been Pasteurized)
6 29oz cans of Bartlett Pears in juice (again, no preservatives, but Pasteurized).
2 lbs Rasins
5 lbs Pure Clover Honey
Lavlin 1118 Wine/Champagne Yeast

Blended the pears and honey up to a fine puree. Blended Rasins in some of the apple cider. Brought entire concoction to boil for 30 minutes.

Now came the hard part. The rasins and puree plugged every method I used to try to CFC chill it. SS scrubbies plugged, even trying to pump it was bad. So in the future, I will try using the juicer I bought just for this (but I was convinced I should be able to just blend it all and boil it for a while and get more fermentables).

Anyway, I finally just poured the remainder through a strainer/funnel into the carboy sitting in an ice bath and let it cool. Pitched yeast, and 5 hours later, it is just starting to bubble. This looks like it is going to turn out more like Apple Jack than any sparkling cider (grin) as it is very dark and looks like a Wiezen more than cider.

The taste of the original solution is great though so far...we'll see how it filters (any ideas on filtering the final ferment?.

I ended up with an OG of 1.118 (refractometer says it is 1.106). Anyway, this is going to probably be pretty high in alcohol content unless I chill it early to stop the ferment. I'll plan to rack to secondary in one week and just keep it in my beer fridge at 40'F (I know they recommend secondary fermenting at around 55'F, but I don't think I can handle drinking my beer that warm).

Cheers,

-Jeff
 

David Woods (67.242.51.219)
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 02:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, the boiling will set in a pectin haze, so you will have problems getting a clear cider.

Also, I hope you like DRY cider! Ale yeast make a dry cider, let alone champagne yeast!

Good luck and let us know what happens.

David
 

Beerboy (81.134.85.22)
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 09:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you want to make 'real Cider' you should just use pressed juice from apples, unpasteurised and allow it to ferment using the wild yeast on the skin.

I think what you have is more along the lines of an apple country wine. You will get a pectin haze and an extremely high alcahol content, and a dry wine at that.

I will probably take years to mellow too.
 

Beerboy (81.134.85.22)
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 09:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"I will probably take years to mellow too." True, but so will your cider/wine.
 

Jeff McClain (137.201.242.130)
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 02:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks. I'll let you all know how it goes. could/should I try racking it to secondary and chilling to around 42'F to stop the ferment early if I want to have a little sweeter/less dry taste?

-Jeff
 

Beerboy (81.134.85.22)
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 03:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you do that you run the risk of it warming up and starting to ferment again. I'd be inclined to leave it to ferment out and artificially sweeten it if you need to.

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