Topics Topics Help/Instructions Help Edit Profile Profile Member List Register  
Search Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Visit The Brewery's sponsor!
Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2003 * October 22, 2003 * My bottled beer is still flat(ish) < Previous Next >

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
  Start New Thread        

Author Message
 

Dave Aronoff (152.163.252.67)
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 12:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Friends,

This one is for the bottlers out there:

I bottled 5 gal of bitter 13 days ago. I was shooting for 1.5-2 volumes CO2 and I used the nomogram in Palmer's book, estimating 2 ounces of corn sugar. Last time, I used 4 ounces and it was too carbonated. Well, it is still purty flat, so I am not too psyched about that.

My question:
Will this perk up a bit over the third week after bottling?

Next time I will split the difference and use 3 ounces.

Thanks a million,

Dave
 

Belly Buster Bob (142.177.106.237)
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 01:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dave, if it is carbed at all, give it more time. Some beers seem to take longer than others. The beer will benefit from the extra time anyway.
Good Luck
 

chumley (65.102.120.23)
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 04:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

As a guy who primes 5 gallons with 6 oz. of corn sugar (regardless of style), I think you under-primed.
 

Craig Johnson (198.81.26.42)
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 12:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dave,

I am with Chumley on this one. I think you are underprimed. I prefer my beers to be carbonated lighter than most people prefer and I use 1/2 cup of corn sugar for five gals. I am told this is about 6 oz. weight.

If you were overcarbonated previously you probably were not finished fermenting. I would guess that you bottled a coupl'a days too early.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 12:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have two recommendations for your future carbonation efforts: use good brewing software such as ProMash or the online Carbonation Calculator to calculate how much priming sugar to use, and measure the sugar by weight rather than volume. This should result in very accurate carbonation.

According to ProMash, 5 gallons of beer carbonated to a somewhat low level, such as an English bitter with 1.75 volumes of CO2, would require 2.4 ounces by weight or 68 grams of priming sugar.
 

Doug Pescatore (141.232.1.10)
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 12:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dave, Give it another week or so, but you may have to deal with an undercarbonated beer. I have also found that beers that have little to no head retention seem under carbonated whether they are conbonated or not. i.e. while I poor it I don't get much of a head, but when I hold the glass up I see plenty of those little tiny bubbles coming up.

-Doug
 

Dave Aronoff (141.214.17.5)
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 02:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks. These are great thoughts. I probably underprimed. Per B.P.'s note, I was about 0.4 ounces underweight (at minimum). I did not think it would be so severely undercarbonated, however...

I will give it more time.
Would it be worth the risk and time to uncap these beers and recap after putting a single Primetab in each bottle?

Dave
 

Doug Pescatore (141.232.1.10)
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 03:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dave,
I did not think of that. You would only loose what is not disolved in the beer, so adding a tab or two would and recapping quickly would probably do the trick.

-Doug
 

big earl (209.222.26.27)
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 03:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

you may only need to place your beer in a warmer place for a week or so (above 70)
 

Walt Fischer (24.221.196.114)
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 03:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

id do what BE says.. warm em up for a week or so and see what happens, before opening em all up again...


Walt
Lama Brewery
----
 

Dave Aronoff (141.214.17.5)
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 06:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Doug, Big Earl, and Walt. I will warm 'em up for a week. If that fails, I will do the Primetab protocol.
 

Joseph Villacrez (64.91.73.223)
Posted on Monday, September 22, 2003 - 02:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have an English ale that took a 5 weeks+ to get to carbonate. My basement is a constant 68 dF. I originally put a case of the stuff in the frig after following the 1-2-3 timing method and there was absolutely no head. The other case I let sit out over 5 weeks(1-2-5) and then I put it in the frig. Best beer to date. It has a good thick head and many little CO2s rising to the top.
Cheers,
Joe
 

Beer-Boy on the Loose (66.134.121.210)
Posted on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 - 09:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dave, here are my thoughts:

1. I don't think you really undercarbonated, at least not for a bitter. Bitters are supposed to have low carbonation. I once carbonated 5 gallons of bitter with 1.5 oz. corn sugar, and I liked the (low) carbonation level. Of course, some people (like Chumley and Craig J.) may like more carbonation. By the way Craig, in my experience, 1/2 cup corn sugar weighs about 2.7 oz. (not even close to 6 oz.).

2. For now, I would follow Big Earl's and Walt's advice. Move 'em to a warmish place and wait.

3. Unless the beer is truly, completely flat, I wouldn't do the PrimeTab thing. Too much of a hassle.
 

Dave Aronoff (141.214.17.5)
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 06:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks BBOTL:

I tried it last night (almost 3 weeks into things). It is still flattish but there were tiny bubbles and the hint of a whiff of a suggestion of a slice of a smidgen of a "pfffft" sound when I opened the bottle. So I will give it another week before primetabbing. I will probably on Primetab 20 bottles as an experiment..
Dave
 

Dave Aronoff (141.214.17.5)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 07:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK folks: This weekend I opened 2 bottles (still undercarbed) and added 1 Primetab to each bottle. Bad idea. These tabs have some trapped gas (air) that starts to come out quickly when put into the beer. Then, my best guess is that these bubbles act to pull the dissolved CO2 out of solution, because the result of dropping in a Primetab was a massive foam over. Twice. Lesson: adding Primetabs to slightly carbonated beer does not work well. Solution: Prime my beer right BEFORE bottling! I will drink this flattish stuff 'cause it is still a tasty specimen...

Thanks to all,

Dave
 

chumley (199.92.192.126)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 07:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A suggestion from someone who has drunk several flat beers:

Mix in at a 3:1 ratio of flat homebrew:neutral flavored megaswill (I prefer Coors) to get some carbonation in your beer without ruining the flavor too much. This process really works well in a pitcher if you have some company.
 

Josh Weber (67.248.78.193)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 07:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dave
your assessment of the primetabs is spot on, at least with my try at it. I did that a while back and it only succeeded at foaming like crazy before I could re cap. I ended up putting a case in a warm spot for a week, didn't end up ideally but worked pretty well.
 

PalerThanAle (65.168.73.62)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 08:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pour the beer into a glass, add a quarter Primetab and drink quickly.

PTA
 

Dave Aronoff (141.214.17.5)
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 08:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks guys!

Dave
 

Joseph Villacrez (207.230.211.122)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 12:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dave,
This may be sacrilegious to the beer gods but, a couple of taps of a salt shaker into the beer may produce what you are looking for. Used to watch the "old" guys down at the brewery do this back in the daze.
Joe
 

Denny Conn (63.114.138.2)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 05:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joseph, I always thought that was to remove the CO2 from the beer.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Salt will certainly cause the bubbles to form as the CO2 comes out of solution around the crystals. However, this will also decrease the overall sensation of carbonation in the beer.
 

Denny Conn (63.114.138.2)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 05:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Didn't I just say that??? ;)
 

Dave Aronoff (141.214.17.5)
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 06:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I will try the salt. Thanks Joe et al. I will let you know how it goes.
Dave
 

Dave Aronoff (141.214.17.5)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 04:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The salt worked, with just a few crystals.
Dave
 

Doug Pescatore (141.232.1.10)
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2003 - 04:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The prime tab reaction makes me think that your problem could have been a combination of low carbonation and little head retention. Meaning that you did have enough carbonation to raise a head on your beer, but with little head retention it is perceived as flat(ish). I have seen this with a couple of my beers with normal priming rates. Right now my O-fest seems a bit flat, but when I look at the glass I have tons of tiny bubbles coming out of solution, but just popping on the surface without much in the way of head.

Just a thought.

-Doug

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.