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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * January 9, 2004 * Brinkmann 170k Burners to Nat. Gas ? < Previous Next >

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ELK (67.164.195.57)
Posted on Thursday, December 04, 2003 - 02:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the best size hole still considered to be by using a 7/64 inch drill bit?
What is the best distance from the bottom rim of the keg or the bottom center? please specify.
I hope to do a test burn later today.
Thanks ELK
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Thursday, December 04, 2003 - 03:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's what I used on my Metal Fusion burner when I converted it to natural gas. You might try a using a bit a few thousandths smaller if you have one. You can always drill a slightly larger hole until you achieve a nice blue flame with only a little yellow at the tip and no carbon deposits on the keg. As for the distance from the burner to the keg bottom, I would say 3-4 inches is about right. You want the flame to fan out and cover the keg bottom without extending beyond the skirt.
 

ELK (67.164.195.57)
Posted on Thursday, December 04, 2003 - 05:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just drove around to several places without luck looking for a needle valve of some type other than a ball valve to control the gas flow to my 2 burners??? I did find out that a hose shop will charge about 25$ to make a 10' 3/8" hose.
 

JimTanguay (67.5.115.66)
Posted on Thursday, December 04, 2003 - 08:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

7/64 is what i used for the best results. I converted two burners and went slightly larger than that on one and it was too big. I get a lot of soot on that burner but it does work and burns really hot! I use ball valves and they work although they are not easy to adjust.
 

ELK (67.164.195.57)
Posted on Thursday, December 04, 2003 - 09:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

IF the flame is yellow do I need to go to a bigger or smaller hole?
Which flame will leave soot? a yellow one?
What about the air adjustment? open wide?
I will adjust tonight in the dark so I can see the flame better.
 

Kent Fletcher (206.170.107.30)
Posted on Friday, December 05, 2003 - 01:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If the flame is yellow, your orifice is too big (sounds like a personal problem...) for the amount of air. If the air is wide open, you'll have to make the orifice smaller. Yellow = incomplete combustion = soot AND excess CO (and NOX?) production.
 

ELK (67.164.195.57)
Posted on Friday, December 05, 2003 - 03:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Fletch, I'm not sure if it works that way or not..

at least with nat gas. which is only at what 10" of water pressure. The larger the hole lowers the velocity and may not ventury in as much air through the air holes..I didn't see much difference from .098 to .105" holes so I will leave it there with some yellow and see what the keg bottom looks like...I rigged up an old 30k propane ring burner to use the brinkman jet and use for a test and to save propane this weekend. The brewstand is on the drawing board...
 

Paul Tackmann (12.2.142.7)
Posted on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 - 05:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have the same yellow/white flame and my vents are open all the way, so i must have drilled out the hole too big, I had gotten my orifices from a place called stratfords or somthing like that
they had turkey fryers and propane burners but Its been a few years and i cant find them on the web. and for a needle valve try mcmaster carr they have needle valves with 1/8 ntp threads
 

Kent Fletcher (206.170.107.30)
Posted on Friday, December 19, 2003 - 06:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ELK,

Yes, fuel mixture too rich. Too big an orifice = higher volume of fuel AND lower velocity, both of which lead to an over-rich mixture and incomplete combustion. Natural gas in most locations is much lower than 10 " w.c., more like 3.- to 3.5"
Since most of the time you can't raise the gas pressure, atmospheric burner output is limited by the flow characteristics of the burner. That's why high BTU atmospheric NG burners have multiple jets, each with it's own air intake, like the units that B3 sells.

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