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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * January 9, 2004 * Using 2 yeasts < Previous Next >

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Moby Dick Brewing (207.70.37.9)
Posted on Friday, December 19, 2003 - 07:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is there any benefit to using two different yeast strains in a single brew? Has it been done by anyone who can give results? Just curious.
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Friday, December 19, 2003 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Possibly, but it depends on what you're trying to accomplish and how you do it. For flavor purposes, it's not too uncommon to split a batch, use 2 different yeasts, and combine after fermentation (I believe this is how Newcastle Brown is made, IIRC). Ocassionally, you will use 2 yeaststsequetially to achieve a higher level of attenuation than the first one alone would give you. Pitching 2 yeasts at once into a single batch is a hit and miss proposition. You have no idea which will predominate, and it will be ahrd to repeat favorable results.
 

Brandon Dachel (216.177.117.110)
Posted on Friday, December 19, 2003 - 09:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I believe Bass *used* to use a 2 strain ferment.

As Denny points out it's really difficult to predict the result of such and endeavor.
 

Doug Pescatore (141.232.1.10)
Posted on Friday, December 19, 2003 - 09:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have split and blended back several times. Usually to add a hint of Belgian funk to a beer. Or to clean up a beer by doing a couple of gallons as a lager (did that once and it worked well) and the rest in a relatively neutral ale strain. I would not mix the yeasts as Denny and Brandon have said, you can not predict how it will turn out.

-Doug
 

Wykowski aka BE (209.222.26.27)
Posted on Friday, December 19, 2003 - 09:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have not done this, but I read (in a pro-brewers newsletter) that many Brew-pubs mix yeast,,, by just pitching both yeasts in the same fermentor at the same time,

as hinted to above, one strain may reproduce quicker and be the dominant strain , but the other strain will still ferment and produce it's own flavors

give it a try, it's only beer, it'll still be drinkable (you could split the batch three ways, for 2 control and 1 mix)
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Friday, December 19, 2003 - 09:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wynkowski, pitching two strains at the same time won't hurt the beer, but one strain tends to predominate, and it's not always the same one. For predictability it's better to ferment a portion of the batch with each and blend post-fermentation, such as in secondary.

As Denny mentions, some beers have a second strain pitched either later during primary fermentation or when the beer is racked to secondary. The reason is to increase attenuation and/or increase the alcohol.
 

Wykowski aka BE (209.222.26.27)
Posted on Friday, December 19, 2003 - 10:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill, I'll have to see if my friend still has the article....

this article said many brewpubs mix yeast (by pitching at the same time) and very little domination occurs ....... they claim the results can be reproduced

I'm supprised you haven't heard similar claims in your Brewing Travels

(again, I'm not making claims,,i'm just passing on information)

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