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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * January 9, 2004 * Advice on mash temps < Previous Next >

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jim williams (68.0.214.107)
Posted on Saturday, December 20, 2003 - 04:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just picked up a bag of czech malt on ebay. I have always brewed ales with a single infusion mash. This will be my second lager, and want to do it right. The beer will be a czech pilsener in the style of Urquell.

Specs:

55 lbs. bag of brewing Moravian Pilsen Malt, Whole Grain,Spring, 2-Row. Crop 2003
Well modified

Origin: Czech Republic

Specifications are as follows:

Moisture - 4,2%
Color - 3,4 EBC, or 1,73 Lovibond
Protein - 11% max
Kolbach index - 38,6
Diastatic power - 285 W.K. or 86 Lintner

I was wondering if someone could give me a good mash step temp. program for this malt. well modified, but, would a protein rest be a good idea still? single infusion? if so, why?

thanks,
Jim
 

Jim Layton (4.72.22.193)
Posted on Saturday, December 20, 2003 - 02:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kolbach index 38.6 indicates that it is "well modified", about on par with the German pils malt that I use a lot.

A single infusion mash will be fine, but a step mash _might_ give you a little higher extract and _might_ give you a clearer beer. The classic protein rest, 30 minutes at 122F, runs a high risk of creating a thin, headless beer with this malt.

A Czech pilsner should start with a somewhat dextrinous wort. For a single infusion, 60 minutes at 153F should be OK.

Personally, I'd use this step mash: Dough-in to hit 135F then ramp to 145F and hold 30 minutes, ramp to 160F and hold 30 minutes, ramp to 170F and start lautering.
 

jim williams (68.0.214.107)
Posted on Saturday, December 20, 2003 - 04:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Jim.
that's the info I was looking for.

Do you, or anyone else know of a place on the web that explains the specs?

thanks,
jim
 

Jim Layton (64.156.79.250)
Posted on Saturday, December 20, 2003 - 04:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here's an old article from Brewing Techniques:

http://brewingtechniques.com/bmg/noonan.html
 

danno (63.224.226.20)
Posted on Sunday, December 21, 2003 - 04:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

oops, double post
 

danno (63.224.226.20)
Posted on Sunday, December 21, 2003 - 04:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jim, have you brewed with that malt? I have many times and almost always include a 124°F protein rest. Pils malt have much higher levels of protiens IIRC and can handle a protein rest. I have never had a head stability issue with using a protein rest and that malt. I do have clarity issues if I don't.
 

Jim Layton (67.31.239.230)
Posted on Monday, December 22, 2003 - 03:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Danno - I haven't brewed with the malt in question. I'm basing my opinions based on the analysis that Jim W. supplied.

How long do you rest at 124? How do you hit the next rest, hot water infusion or direct heat? If direct heat, what is your ramp rate? These details are important and may explain why one brewer successfully uses a protein rest and another brewer ruins the body and foam stand.

As for protein levels, the analysis above indicates 11% max. That doesn't tell you much except that it is probably within the preferred range of 9%-11%.

The key malt specification to base the mash routine on is not total protein but the ratio of soluable to total protein (the Kolbach index is the European equivalent of the S/T ratio). A high S/T ratio, say 40%+, indicates that the maltster has already done about all of the protein breakdown that you would want. Low ratios, say under 35%, would tell you that a protein rest
is probably a necessity. This malt is shown as 38.6%, so its in that gray area. A protein rest may be OK, maybe not, depending on rest and ramp time.

I've been sticking with Weyermann for my pils malt in nearly all of my lagers for a few years now. It's typical S/T ratio is 38%-42%. I've been playing around with brief protein rests in the 131F-135F range, still not sure that I've seen much change in clarity but the beer has been good. There's some chill haze but it almost always clears up after a few weeks of lagering.

Several years ago I tried 30 minutes at 122F and the beer turned out very clear but very thin. I use direct heat and ramp at about 2F per minute, and I'm sure that is a factor. Given a choice between haze and thin, headless beer, I'll take a little haze.

It's a balancing act. One side is hazy beer, the other side is bad beer. I'm still trying to get it just right.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Monday, December 22, 2003 - 01:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I find that malt in the "questionable" area mentioned by Jim L. above benefits from a brief (15 minute) protein rest at 130-135 F. This seems sufficient to break down the larger proteins than can cause haze but not the smaller ones that contribute to head and body. As Jim suggests, however, such a rest is not essential. Often a little longer lagering period (beneficial for flavor anyway) does the job nearly as well. I would argue this is rather a fine distinction and that it's hard to brew bad beer with good malt.

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