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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * January 9, 2004 * Tired old question for the 1,000,000th time < Previous Next >

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Brian Garber (24.145.155.115)
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 12:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok, sorry guys, but I gotta know. I'm using a propane burner for the wort boil and I'm worried about soot. Do you put liquid dish soap on the bottom of the kettle to help clean the soot or is it bar soap? (Actually, I'll make sure that I'm cookin' with a blue flame, but what are ya gonna do?)

Thanks,
Brian
 

Connie (12.77.145.123)
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 12:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I try to cook with a blue flame and don't do anything else. A little BKF and a green scrubbie will take off any soot that does form.
 

Brian Garber (24.145.155.115)
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 01:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ah yes, bar keepers friend. That is definitely one of man's greatest inventions.
 

matt_dinges (67.31.177.215)
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 03:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeah, its incredible...I hadn't scrubbed the bottom of my kettle for 30+ batches...5minutes with BKF and it shined...I wouldn't mess with the soap.
 

Rich Bartsch (24.12.156.37)
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 04:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I seem to remember from my Boy Scout days that bar soap was the recommended treatment. Rub it on, ruin the soap, and it never came off. That was for cooking over a wood fire though.

I never have soot problems with my cooker. I use a scrubby once in a while just out of habbit and it shines right up.
 

chumley (63.227.169.156)
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 05:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Darn! Given the topic, I clicked on this thread and was figuring it was another stuck fermentation, and Bill Pierce would be replying "Pitch a large population and aerate well." :)

Personally, my kettle sits in the garage and is black as coal. I wash it down with a hose once in a while, and that's it - its a garage, for crissake.
 

MJR (24.217.160.206)
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 05:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

'Darn! Given the topic, I clicked on this thread and was figuring it was another stuck fermentation, and Bill Pierce would be replying "Pitch a large population and aerate well."'

I was thinking the exact same thing Chumley!

-Mark
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 03:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've given my mantra a rest for this thread.

If there is significant soot on the bottom of the kettle it indicates that the fuel/air mixture of the burner is incorrect; it is not getting enough air. You may want to make some adjustments or modifications to the burner. The flame should be almost entirely blue with only a tiny bit of yellow at the tip.

That said, liquid detergent wiped on the kettle bottom before boiling makes cleaning the soot considerably easier.

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