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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * January 29, 2004 * Rookie mistake < Previous Next >

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False Bottom SupplierBill Pierce01-16-04  08:21 pm
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Matt Peterson (64.85.231.38)
Posted on Monday, December 29, 2003 - 12:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Brewed batch #3 today, Rogue's Imperial IPA (extract kit.) Of course I racked it to the fermenter and pitched the yeast without getting my OG reading. Realizing my error, I took a sample minutes after the yeast was in and took a hydrometer reading. Question: Will my OG reading be accurate if taken at the time it was? The recipe did not include target OG numbers but the reading I got was 1.075. This seems pretty high to me but maybe for this brew it is within range? Any help much appreciated.

Matt
 

Bill Tobler (204.136.184.34)
Posted on Monday, December 29, 2003 - 12:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Matt,
I think you'll be fine. The yeast "may" give you a slight error, but you should be in the ballpark. Imperial IPA is one of the "proposed" new categories for Cat 7. If I were to guess, I'd say an OG of 1.075-1.090+ would be good numbers for this beer. IBU's will probably be 60-100+.

That's not just a rookie mistake; it could be an "I drank too much homebrew" mistake which is why I forget to do the same thing on Christmas Eve. I made a Bohemian Pilsner and pitched it on top of a yeast cake from a CAP I made ten days earlier. I didn't realize for a couple of hours, and went back and it already had a solid krausen. I didn't bother sampling then. I did do a pre-boil gravity, so I just backtracked and came up with a ballpark number.

Bill
 

Matt Peterson (64.85.231.38)
Posted on Monday, December 29, 2003 - 01:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill,
Thanks for the info. By the time I had the wort into the fermenter I'd had 3 or 4 Lagunitas IPAs, so my focus may have been a bit hazy leading to a skipped step :-) But I remember more and forget less each time I brew, all just part of the learning curve I guess.

Matt
 

Ryan Larsen (67.3.193.103)
Posted on Monday, December 29, 2003 - 03:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Matt, I did the same thing last week!! And it's not just a rookie mistake. I'be been brewing partial mash beers for about 10 years and every so often I forget to take my OG reading until after I dump my yeast! (Drinkin' not Thinkin')

I made an imperial IPA Dec. 21st and took my reading ten or so minutes after I dumped my starter in. - 1.086 :)

Today it's at 1.023 and I don't know if it'll go lower but that'll work.

1.075 seems good for an Imperial IPA. Thats at the top of a standard IPA. I wouldn't sweat it. If you took your reading before the yeast became active you will be all right.

RDWHAH,
Ryan
 

Matt Peterson (64.85.231.38)
Posted on Monday, December 29, 2003 - 05:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Ryan. It's good to know that the mistakes I'm making are the same ones that experienced brewers make now & then. While we're on the subject of Imperial IPAs, maybe I can pick your brain on another matter. This will be the first recipe I have brewed that will need to be racked to a secondary fermenter. What is the drill for that? Do I just siphon to the secondary and let it sit? Should it stay at fermentation tempuratures? And when do I transfer? When primary fermentation has stopped? Do I determine that by a hydrometer reading?

Thanks again,
Matt
 

Ryan Larsen (216.27.223.203)
Posted on Monday, December 29, 2003 - 02:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

>What is the drill for that? Do I just siphon and let it sit?

Yes, you want to siphon to the secondary. The trick is to do a quite siphon. By this I mean you don't want to splash the beer at all. Now that your beer has fermented you'll want to keep from adding any oxygen to it. I use an auto-siphon (worth its weight in gold, IMHO) and a long enough piece of hose to go all the way down to the bottom of the secondary. Siphon all the beer off the yeast cake and then, yes, you'll just let it sit in the secondary.

>Should it stay at fermentation tempuratures? And when do I transfer?

From what I've seen there is a lot of debate about using secondary fermenters for every beer. However, I secondary all my beers. I move my beer off the primary yeast cake after noticeable fermentation has stopped. With ales it's usually 3 to 5 days. I will then let it finish fermenting at about 65d to 68d until the hydrometer readings show no more fermentation is taking place.

These days I secondary in kegs so when there is no longer fermentation taking place I'll drop the chest freezer to 50d and let the beer age if needs be. When it has aged I'll transfer it to a serving keg using CO2, drop temp to 35d and carbonate it.

Again, the main thing is try not to disturb the beer any more than you have to. You don't want to add any of that paper/cardboard flavor to your beer.

Ryan
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 08:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Matt, if it was an extract kit, you can post the amount and typr (liquid or dry) of extract you used and we can show you how to calculate your OG.
 

Matt Peterson (64.85.231.38)
Posted on Thursday, January 01, 2004 - 11:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny,
I used 35ml. of White Labs California Ale Yeast- WLP001. It's liquid.

Matt
 

Matt Peterson (64.85.231.38)
Posted on Thursday, January 01, 2004 - 11:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny,
I used 35ml. of White Labs California Ale Yeast- WLP001. It's liquid. My original post indicated I had brewed an Imperial IPA. Actually, that's what I had intended to brew that day but changed my mind when I got to B3 to buy the kit. What I ended up brewing was a Blind Pig IPA.

Matt
 

Belly Buster Bob (142.177.93.167)
Posted on Thursday, January 01, 2004 - 04:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've brewed beers without ever taking a grav reading. I broke my hydrometer once and was not able to get to the city to buy a new one for months. (prior to internet) All the beers were good but a bit of a mystery. Regardless of your reading, it still ends up beer.
 

Chris Colby (66.25.196.39)
Posted on Thursday, January 01, 2004 - 05:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Speaking of forgetting steps -- does anyone out there use a checklist when they brew? I write out a list of key planned events (mash schedule and amount of water needed at each step, hop additions, when to add Irish moss, when to submerge wort chiller, when to take measurements and etc.) and follow that while I brew. I find it helps alot.


Chris Colby
Bastrop, TX
 

Bill Tobler (216.62.156.206)
Posted on Thursday, January 01, 2004 - 06:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chris, I make a Promash printout for reference, and also write down everything I do and everything that happens in a journal I keep in the brewery. That includes from how I make up my water, who was visiting, temperature over/under shoots and how I fixed it/if I fixed it, what ever. It makes interesting reading down the road when you want to see what you did.

Last nights brew was a blur. I didn't write down anything and had to try and recap this morning. But, there is ten gallons of a fermenting American Larger with a solid Kraeusen going at 50 degrees, so I must have done something right.

Building and Brewing in Texas
Bill Tobler
My Brewery
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Thursday, January 01, 2004 - 06:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a brewing form that lists most of the steps and forces me to fill it out as I brew. It tends to keep me honest. I don't have a handheld computer or I might design something that could be used on brew day.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Thursday, January 01, 2004 - 06:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ignore this post.
 

Jim Layton (67.31.239.53)
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 04:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chris - you betcha I make a list before every brew. It's really just my brewing log, a spiral notebook with details of each brew session - recipe, mash temps, water quantities, SG measurements, boil time, water treatment, whatever. Plan the brew, write it down, and brew per the plan.
 

Jake Isaacs (160.129.126.219)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 12:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Since I do lab work for a living, the idea of following a detailed written protocol in my free time on brew day makes me cringe. I have my grain bill and hop schedule printed out, but everything else is freestyle. I rarely take hydrometer readings, but I do file my recipes (sometimes with tasting notes later on).

Brew however you like, but don't feel like you necessarily need to be anal about organization and bookkeeping if you don't want to be. You'll soon get a feel for how things are supposed to run and might even make recipe changes at the last second to suit your mood.

Malt, hops, water, and yeast combined with care in reasonable amounts will almost always yield beer.
 

Fredrik (213.114.44.219)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 12:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

During the acual brew I've had pen a paper as well as a stopwatch within reach so I can make a note on when anything interesting happens.

After the brew I put anything I want to remember into the computer on spreadsheets. Papernotes tend to get lost. Any important papernotes I scan into the computer as images. I have one folder for each brew, where I save everything related to the brew, microscopes shots or other calculations. I find it great to have when revieweing old brews.

/Fredrik
 

Marlon Lang (68.218.228.52)
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2004 - 12:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Matt,
The responses to your post cover the entire spectrum. In the homebrew world, there are anul brewers and free spirits. But as Jake says, ultimately, the end product is beer. If you think that you might want to exactly repeat a brew, then make copious notes and follow a checklist. If you are just happy that the result is good beer, then just Brew On and don't sweat the small stuff.

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