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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Januray 20, 2004 * Wheat < Previous Next >

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Brandon Dachel (216.177.117.110)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 08:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was given about 100lbs of (southern Illinois) winter wheat over Christmas and while I like witbiers, that's alot of witbier.

So, I have a number of questions relating to this.

1. I'm going to malt a bit of it (because I can). I've cleaned it, and it's soaking now. I'm planning on the 8 hours in water, 8 hours dry, 8 hours in water, till I see roots. I'll then lay it out and seal it up in a garbage bag. I plan on drying it in the dryer. Any suggestions on malting wheat?

2. Cereal mashing wheat - throw some base malt in there and boil it for a while (similar to cereal mashing corn grits?) ? How long? Any rests?

3. Reason for cereal mashing the wheat - I'm about to make my first pLambic. I've got all of the yeast/bacterial cultures I need. Any suggestions on trying to mill unmalted wheat?

On the note of lambics - I'm not ready to get into the barrel thing so I'm wondering how successful oak strips would be in maintaining a viable lambic culture of yeast/bacteria. My thinking is to put the strips in the carboy and then use those strips in subsequent batches. I have no problems keeping the brett. strains of yeast on slants (I do this already) but the bacterial strains seem to require storage and handling procedures (and media) that are above my capabilities.

Do any of the bacterial cultures survive in lambics after many months?
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.63.119)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 08:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Place the wheat in a cloth bag when you dry it in the dryer. There is a lot of chaff and root material that you don't want clogging the dryer.

I've seen various figures for the gelatinization temperature of unmalted wheat, anywhere from 52 to 80 C (126-176 F), so I'm not sure if a cereal mash is needed. I know malted wheat will gelatinize at the same temperature as malted barley (64 C or 148 F).
 

chumley (65.102.120.71)
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 10:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've tried adding raw, cracked wheat directly to the mash, and got really poor extraction rates, so I assumed it didn't work at all. The next time I tried cereal mashing the same way Jeff Renner specifies for corn grits, and got great extraction. So I have done the same ever since.

Can't help you on the lambic question, Brandon, as I am one of those oak cask lambic brewers. :) It would seem to me that you want to use a plastic carboy or bucket, though, in order to let that little bit of air to come through the semi-permeable fermentor walls for the lambic yeasts and bacteria to process. From reading the Orval threads, someone said (Adam W.?) that the brett. characxter in a closed fermentor is quite different than in an open fermentor after several months.
 

Brandon Dachel (216.177.117.110)
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2004 - 03:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

> From reading the Orval threads, someone said
> (Adam W.?) that the brett. characxter in a
> closed fermentor is quite different than in an
> open fermentor after several months.

Yes. I remember those threads and I'm thankful that you reminded me. I know I can get 5 gallon water jugs very cheap at wally world. that may be a good idea for this.

> The next time I tried cereal mashing the same
> way Jeff Renner specifies for corn grits, and
> got great extraction.

OK, cool. That's the same procedure I use when making a CAP so no biggie.
 

Jim Layton (209.245.224.8)
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2004 - 07:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'll second Chumley's recommendation to do a cereal mash with the raw wheat. Same as you would with corn grits. Works great.

As for grinding raw wheat - two passes through my fixed gap Maltmill seemed to do a good enough job. Those wheat kernels are tough.

>...I'm wondering how successful oak strips would be in maintaining a viable lambic culture of yeast/bacteria.

Don't know, but I'd suppose that the chances of success woud be reduced unless you kept the wooden strips in more or less continuous use.

>Do any of the bacterial cultures survive in lambics after many months?

Absolutely.

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