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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * January 29, 2004 * Burned nylon strainer bag. Now what? < Previous Next >

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John Schmidt (65.238.10.240)
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 02:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was trying my first mini-mash with 5 lb of grain today. I was maintaining the temp by alternating between medium-high and medium, and after I turned my back for a few minutes with the temp on medium high, I smelled a burning smell. When I lifted the grain bag out of the kettle, it was black on the bottom and had a big hole in it. Has this ever happened to anyone else? What did you do? Can I still brew this batch? I suspect the answer is "no, toss it," but I thought I'd ask anyway. What a shame, I was really looking forward to brewing a partial mash version of DC's RyePA.
 

Jim Layton (209.245.232.101)
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 04:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry to hear about the brew gone bad. Yeah, I'd toss it. I've never burned a nylon bag in my wort but I have tasted beer made from a scorched mash. Ick.
 

Belly Buster Bob (131.137.245.198)
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 05:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

all you need now is water and yeast. I'd giver a try anyway. all you have to lose is a pack of yeast
 

John Schmidt (65.238.10.66)
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 06:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the responses. I decided to cut my losses and toss it rather than lose the DME, hops, and yeast too. The wort smelled burnt so the finished beer probably would have too.

There's got to be an easier way to use rye in an extract beer. Maybe I could steep flaked rye and add enzyme powder to make up for the lack of base malt. Any thoughts? Well, off to bed.
 

robert rulmyr (63.156.128.1)
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 11:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

'Coolers' are really nice for partial mashes. I used a 5 gallon Gott for about 3 years. No risk of burning. Also, the partial mash beers were just as good as the all-grain batches I make now!
 

Jim Layton (209.245.233.235)
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 01:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

>Maybe I could steep flaked rye and add enzyme powder to make up for the lack of base malt.

I don't think that will give nearly the same flavor as mashing _malted_ rye.

I'd give it another try. See if you have a pot for the mash that will fit in your oven. It's easy to maintain the mash temperature in an oven set at 150-160F.
 

ahancbrew1 (143.183.121.1)
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 02:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

John,

I mash in a 5 gallon pot. I heat the water to about 10 degrees hotter than the mash temperature; add the grains or grain bag and place in my oven at 150 degrees. I never liked using the stove to maintain my mash temperature.

Andy
 

Vance Barnes (69.15.38.210)
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2004 - 04:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mash the grains in a pot without a bag and then pour them through the bag into another vessel. Or get some type of clamp for the bag to make sure it never touches the bottom of the kettle. The clamp is not so practicle for a partial mash as it is for steeping.
 

Tory Scharrer (63.87.38.66)
Posted on Monday, January 19, 2004 - 04:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'd suggest that if you want to do the partial mash, you can continue doing it with your nylon bag. Buy a seafood steamer (should be about $10 at Meijer or a similar store). They're an enameled steel pot similar to the pots people use for canning, except they have a false bottom with very large holes in them. This would keep your bag from ever touching bottom as well.
 

John Schmidt (65.238.10.56)
Posted on Monday, January 19, 2004 - 07:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Actually, Tory, I'm putting together an MLT from a cooler, so I'm only going to be screwing up all grain batches from now on. My 4-gal. enameled stock pot came with one of those false bottoms. I remembered it right after I burned the grain bag. The LHBS owner even warned me that the nylon bags tend to burn easily. Oh, well.
 

David Woods (67.242.51.125)
Posted on Monday, January 19, 2004 - 07:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I used to put my stirring spoon across the pot and tie the bag to it so that it never touched the bottom. Worked for me!

David
 

Ryan Larsen (216.27.223.203)
Posted on Monday, January 19, 2004 - 08:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

John, I don't know if you've got started on that MLT or not, but I recently built Denny Conn's MLT per his article in BYO and it works great!(Cheap too)

Click here to see his webpage. It shows how it's done.

Ryan
 

John Schmidt (65.238.10.56)
Posted on Monday, January 19, 2004 - 08:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's what I'm doing too, except I'm using a cylindrical cooler. I just need the minikeg bung and it should be complete.
 

Denny Conn (63.114.138.2)
Posted on Monday, January 19, 2004 - 08:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey, John, let me know how it works in a cylindrical. My preference is for rectangulars, and I've converted several, but never done a cylindrical.

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