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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * March 02, 2004 * Diacetyl rest...How is it done? < Previous Next >

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Jim O'Conner (64.70.24.110)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 09:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

On the Wyeast website, certain yeast strains benefit from a "thorough diacetyl rest". What is this, and how is it done?
 

Brandon Dachel (216.177.117.110)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

when your lager is done fermenting simply allow it to warm up to room temperature for a day or two. Then proceed with lagering. That's all there is too it.
 

chumley (199.92.192.126)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 10:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Before bothering with it, taste your lager to see if there is any diacetyl. If you don't taste any butter, then you don't need to do it.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.129.137)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 10:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

As Brandon suggests, conduct the diacetyl rest in the primary fermenter, than rack to secondary and proceed with lagering.
 

Ken Anderson (24.55.255.75)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 10:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do you time this rest from when you place the fermenter in the warmer area, or from when the beer actually reaches the higher temperature? I would think it could take several hours for the temperature to rise.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.129.137)
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 10:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

At the end of primary fermentation, I move the fermenter from my fermenting refrigerator into the 60-70 F basement area, let it stay there for 48 hours and then rack to secondary and place the new fermenter in my lagering fridge. It works for me.
 

Jim O'Conner (64.70.24.110)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 10:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What about for ales? I understand the rest for lagers.
 

Brandon Dachel (216.177.117.110)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 12:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Diacetyl is considered a flaw in lagers. It is not necessarily a flaw in ales. The scottish ale yeast, for instance, tend to produce alot of diacetyl and it's part of the accepted flavor profile for that strain.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.129.137)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 12:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Because a diacetyl rest occurs at 60-70 F, most ale yeast strains already reduce most of the diacetyl they produce. The exceptions are mentioned by Brandon above.
 

Mike Kidulich (147.177.11.127)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 05:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think the strain Jim refers to is the Ringwood strain, which can throw tremendous amounts of diacetyl. Middle Ages brewing in Syracuse, NY uses Ringwood, and some of their beers have an aroma resembling buttered popcorn. I'm certainly not opposed to some diacetyl in a pale ale, but it can get excessive at times, depending on the handling of this particular yeast. It's been rumored that one of the brewers at MA is completely blind to diacetyl, which could explain a lot.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.129.137)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 07:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Wyeast 1187 Ringwood strain comes by its "notorious" reputation because it requires relatively high pitching rates and good aeration so that it doesn't produce diacetyl. If those precautions are observed, it can be a very good fermenter, resulting in very clear beer in a short amount of time, with only some restrained fruitiness rather than smelling and tasting like a bag of butter-flavored microwave popcorn.

I'm just the opposite with diacetyl; I can detect it from a mile away, although I don't mind a very small amount when it contributes a buttery smoothness to some ales. However, my tolerance for DMS is high; Rolling Rock has just the barest amount according to my taste buds, while others can hardly stand it.
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 07:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've found that diacetyl has to be at a pretty high level for me to taste it, but I can feel it on the roof of my mouth in small amounts.

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