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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * April 13, 2004 * Force carbing in keg again... < Previous Next >

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John (205.188.116.23)
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 04:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

WHen i have forced carbed in the past i usually set it at about 30psi, shake and let it sit over night and then bump it down the next day and drink(im alaways rushing to drink! :) ) So i was wondering what the "normal" way of force carbing is?
 

JOHN K. LEE (206.66.239.111)
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 04:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think everybody has their own version. It's kinda like brewing. Everybody is doing the same thing it just tastes a little different. I personally got into a regimen where I set to 15 psi and shake for a minute or so once a day for three days depending on the style of course. For lagers which I carbonate a little more I set to 25lbs on the 3rd day. Enjoy.
-J.K.L.
 

Wykowski (209.222.26.27)
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 04:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I get it cold set it a 30psi, check it every day (1-3days)untill it tastes right

I have too much beer around, to mess with shaking
 

PalerThanAle (65.168.73.62)
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 04:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

<too much beer around
I see the words, and can identify with each one individually, but that phrase makes no sense to me.

I set mine at 32psi at basement temps for a week or so until its turn in the barrel.

PTA
 

Ric Heinz (64.154.26.251)
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 04:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have heard others say that they are doing this. In my case, it seems to take more than a couple of weeks before ale becomes thoroughly carbinated. It eventually becomes carbinated though and has the tiny bubbles rising through the entire glassfull.

I have never tried to quantify when this occurs. I can say however that I believe with one week at 30 psi, the ale will pour with a head, taste as though it's carbinated, but will be flat within a few minutes.

I have considered that this may be a characteristic of the water I am using, Northwest Houston ground water.

Ric
Houston, TX
 

PalerThanAle (65.168.73.62)
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 04:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

it probably has more to do with temperature of the beer than the source of the water.

PTA
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 05:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do this...

http://www.bodensatz.com/staticpages/index.php?page=Soda-Kegs#carbonation
 

Wykowski (209.222.26.27)
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 05:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"I have too much beer around, to mess with shaking" that means if you have plenty o beer your not so impatient, that you even have to shake a keg

the colder the beer, the quicker it will carb
 

JOHN K. LEE (206.66.239.111)
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 05:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You got it, Wykowski...I NEED MORE BEER!
-J.K.L.
 

Vance Barnes (69.15.38.210)
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 08:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chill to 40, 30 psi for 2 minutes while shaking, wait ~20 min. and bleed off some pressure. Keep bleeding off pressure every 20 min. or so until the sound changes to a lower psi pffffft. Drink beer. Waiting days or weeks, I see the words but they don't make sense.

I carb my lagers right out of the lagering fridge at 32 so due to the colder temp the 2 minutes of shaking and 30 psi of CO2 gives the slightly higher carb level for them, i.e. CO2 gets more soluable the colder the beer gets.
 

chumley (216.161.219.66)
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2004 - 09:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vance, do you lager in a keg? If so, do you carb right out of your lagering keg, or do you transfer to a clean keg to get it off the precipitated yeast and chill haze? If so, how do you transfer - siphoning or jumper cables?
 

Denny Conn (140.211.82.4)
Posted on Wednesday, April 07, 2004 - 04:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

chumley, I do the same as Vance. I lager in a keg and froce carb in the same keg. By that time, it's already been through primary and secondary before going into the keg for lagering, so there's not much "gunk" in it.
 

Vance Barnes (69.15.38.210)
Posted on Wednesday, April 07, 2004 - 05:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I usually will secondary/lager in a carboy (@32*) and then transfer to a pre-chilled keg. At that point it is just above 32 and can be carbed. My Maibock (see CACA thread) I'm going to rack to a keg tonight and finish the lagering there. Probably just carb in the same keg when it's done as most of the yeast has already settled. If I did the whole lagering in a keg I think I'd move to another with jumper hoses to get it off the precipitated yeast. That would get all stirred up when carbing and defeat part of the reasons for lagering (the clarity ones). As it is I usually use a super siphon to transfer from carboy to keg. Mine never seems to be around long enough to have oxidation issues.
 

Peter Roman (129.21.227.182)
Posted on Wednesday, April 07, 2004 - 09:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was under the impression that over an unlimited time line a beer will reach a certain level of carbonation depending on temp and applied pressure. For example, if I take a keg of flat beer and chill it to 40F, i must apply 12 PSI to get it to stay at 2.5 carb level. Im sure this would happen over a long long period of time. But I have youth and therefore no patience whatsoever. So I crank the regulator up to ~30psi and shake shake shake for about 10 min or so. I then reduce the regulator screw to approx 12 psi, then bleed the co2 until the pressure drops to 12psi. I then taste to see if i need more or less. If I need more, i repeat the above steps. If i need less (overcarbbed it), I shut off the regulator and draw off a few pints until the carb decreases. The level decreases due to the beer using its own carbonation to pressurise the headspace. ( i know that isn't what technically happens but for all intensive purposes). Really like all the [more] experienced gentlmen have written, its all according to taste. The carb calculator here helps a lot too...

Brew on you crazy fools,
Peter Roman

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