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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * April 24, 2004 * How critical is Yeast selection in a witbier < Previous Next >

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Beerboy (81.134.87.11)
Posted on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 - 10:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What if I were to use a lager yeast at ale temperature, or an English ale yeast. Would this seriously alter the flavour profile?

I find the yeast character of hoegaarden fairly restrained by Belgian standards and wondered what peoples views on this were as I intend to make one soon and have no Belgian yeast so was wondering if I could use what I have at hand.
 

Paul Hayslett (64.252.36.141)
Posted on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 - 12:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I really, really hate those posts which start out, "Well, I haven't done it myself but I've heard...." Yet that is exactly what I'm about to write. Ironic, no?

I was in my LHBS a couple weeks ago buying ingredients for the wit I will make next month. It will be my first, so I was asking for advice from the owner. She agrees with you about the yeast character in Hoegaarden. She insisted that the best wits she has had were made with Wyeast 3463 Forbidden Fruit, *not* with Wyeast 3944 which is supposed to be the Hoegaarden/Celis strain. (She also said that 3944 makes a better saison than the Wyeast saison strain, but that's neither here nor there.)

Like I said, I've never made a Wit, so what do I know? But my source is co-author of "Clone Brews" and "Beer Captured", so I trust her advice.
 

gregory gettman (155.43.144.4)
Posted on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 - 03:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The actual yeast used is very important when making a wit. It needs to be a dry high attenuator first of all, then a little acidic, finally fruity and or phenolic.

This discription does not fit most lager strains, even at high temps, which may produce an un drinkable beer. Except maybe with the average california strain, but thats "not a wit"

Use a belgian strain that mentions wit in its description..

MY personal fav is....

3942 Belgian Wheat Yeast. Estery, low phenol producing yeast from small Belgian brewery. Apple, bubble gum and plum like aromas with a dry but fruity finish. Flocculation - medium; apparent attenuation 72-76%. (64-74° F, 18-23° C)

And I recommend you ferment it on the cool side as I'm not fond of phenols in my wit, maybe in a hef though :)

but its up to you I guess...........
 

Denny Conn (63.114.138.2)
Posted on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 - 03:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yep, it's extremely importatnt. WY 3944, 3942, or 3463 are all good choices. A British yeast or lager yeast at lae temps won't even be close.
 

Hophead (167.4.1.38)
Posted on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 - 03:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Greg, I don't see wit in the description?! :)
 

Beerboy (81.134.87.11)
Posted on Wednesday, April 14, 2004 - 09:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK, I'll use the proper yeast.
 

Chris Smedley (67.85.185.48)
Posted on Friday, April 16, 2004 - 02:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What temp do you guys ferment WLP400 Wit at? I'm about to brew my first ten gallons of wit next weekend and I'm not one to trust White Labs' ranges (they are often much too wide or include temps much too high).

As a sub-question: what is the LOWEST WL's WIt yeast will ferment at? I plan to use the cake for an experimental Belgian-German-American-whatever pRoggenbier and would like to ferment at the lower end of its range.
 

Bill Pierce (24.141.129.137)
Posted on Friday, April 16, 2004 - 01:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'd ferment a wit at about 70 F. I suspect White Labs WLP400 will ferment down to the low 60s F.

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