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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through November 18, 2004 * Grainy, Worty Smell? < Previous Next >

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George Schmidt
Member
Username: Gschmidt

Post Number: 211
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, November 10, 2004 - 09:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was talked into bringing some brew to a party last week. Against my better judgement, I took my stout and brown in two liter bottles, along with a few wit's in 22oz bottles. The only thing anybody else liked was the wit (they were too busy killing a case of coors light) so I was left to drink the two liters myself. I didn't even open the brown since the stout at 39 OG is a better session beer.

After about two hours and half the bottle I began to notice an unpleasant off smell in the stout, presumably from oxidation. It was NOT there when I first opened the bottle. It smelled very grainy, husky, worty, rather like spent grains smell after you've let them sit overnight. Not a soured-mash smell, just husky. It still tasted fine, but the smell was distracting. The beer in the keg doesn't have this smell, either.

So I'm guessing that was oxidation damage, right? If so, should it have shown up so fast? I purged the bottles with the carbonator cap and recapped them on foam, so I don't think it started to get oxidized until I started pouring it. Does this indicate some kind of flaw in my beer that I might be able avoid in the future.

This was a very simple stout of 6# pale, 1# flaked barley, 1/2 flaked oat, 1/2# roasted, mashed at 152F for an hour. It was the one during which my manifold came off, and then the sparge stuck. So the hot mash did get poured around alot. I suppose HSA is a possibility?
Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors -- and miss. ~~Robert A. Heinlein: The Notebooks of Lazarus Long
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 3797
Registered: 01-2001
Posted on Wednesday, November 10, 2004 - 10:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

George, I don't think oxidation will set in that fast. Now, if it was _already_ oxidized, the warmer temp would bring that aroma out more. The same reason you don't drink beer ice cold. And grainy and worty isn't a typical oxidation aroma, AFAIK.
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 1085
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Wednesday, November 10, 2004 - 10:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

George, what is the F.G. of the stout?
 

George Schmidt
Member
Username: Gschmidt

Post Number: 212
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Wednesday, November 10, 2004 - 11:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill, it's 1.013. Why?
Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors -- and miss. ~~Robert A. Heinlein: The Notebooks of Lazarus Long
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 1087
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2004 - 01:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If the O.G. was 1.039 and the F.G. was 1.013, that's an apparent attenuation of only 66 percent and, more relevant, a real extract of 1.018 (4.5 degrees Plato). This would result in a relatively worty beer, especially when it warmed sufficiently for the flavor to be more apparent.

A dry stout should more properly finish at about 1.008-1.010. I'd call your beer somewhat underattenuated.
 

George Schmidt
Member
Username: Gschmidt

Post Number: 214
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2004 - 01:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok, looking at my notes, rather than just the mash schedule... I actually mashed it at 156F. I adjusted the wrong way for my thermometer inaccuracy. Is that 4 degrees enough to cause this? It sat on the primary for 3 weeks, so I think the yeast did all it could.
Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors -- and miss. ~~Robert A. Heinlein: The Notebooks of Lazarus Long
 

Jeffery Swearengin
Advanced Member
Username: Beertracker

Post Number: 526
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2004 - 05:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The off-flavor you're describing, "husky/grainy" is usually associated with over-sparging, sparging with alkaline or hot (>180F) water or extended mashing. Did any of those things happen during the brew? Mashing @ 156F would cause a more dextrinous wort i.e. unfermentables & possibly the "worty" aroma, but not the other.
CHEERS! Beertracker

"From man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world." ~ Saint Arnold of Metz (580-640) - Patron Saint of Brewers

 

George Schmidt
Member
Username: Gschmidt

Post Number: 216
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2004 - 12:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jeffery, it's not a husky flavor, it's just a smell, and it's not like that out of the keg. It just shows up after the beer sits out a while.

And thinking about it, there is definately some, uh...biological evidence the next morning that there are lots of unfermentables in the beer.
Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors -- and miss. ~~Robert A. Heinlein: The Notebooks of Lazarus Long
 

David S
Member
Username: Dsundberg

Post Number: 172
Registered: 04-2004
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2004 - 09:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I use 2 liter bottles all of the time for transporting (and storing) beer and I've never had any off flavors. I've also kept the beer in them for several weeks at a time.