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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through December 11, 2004 * ? about using a freezer to control ferm temps < Previous Next >

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Busted Still Brewery
Advanced Member
Username: Brewlabs

Post Number: 539
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 11:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

so i'm on my second batch using a freezer to control my ferm temps. I was wondering at what point i should remove the beer and let it finish fermenting at room temp. I had heard some talk about raising the temp after the rigorous fermentation has completed.

I'm on my fifth day of fermenting an og 1.066 beer (WL california V yeast with a starter) and I can see that the rolling fermentation has stopped and the krausen is falling back into the beer. I have not taken a hydro reading yet, but I was wondering if these are signs to bring it to room temp and wait for it to finish out.

(Message edited by brewlabs on December 10, 2004)
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1018
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 12:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I gradually raise my temps during the latter stages of fermentation on ales. I don't have any set rules, it is just sort of a Zen type response when I decide to up it by 2 ro 3 degrees.

Lagers are left at fermentation temps for at least 3 weeks (I don't care if it looks like fermentation stopped after a week--why rush it?) before I do the 60F rest to get rid of any butter popcorn flavors.

-Doug
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 1399
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 01:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

For ales there is no need to raise the fermentation temperature if fermentation is complete. For lagers you may wish to give the beer a diacetyl rest before you rack to secondary, depending on the yeast strain.

As always, depend on gravity readings to determine when the beer is ready. Using other signs (bubbles, kraeusen, etc.) is little more than guessing.
 

Ken Anderson
Intermediate Member
Username: Ken75

Post Number: 499
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 03:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's arguable as to whether or not it's even necessary to rack to the so-called "secondary" fermenter.
Also, has anyone ever done a split batch to test the value of the diacetyl rest? That would be a gravy experiment to do. And God forgive me for using the word "experiment." Uh
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 1403
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 03:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ken, it's fairly obvious that some lager strains tend to produce diacetyl and benefit from a diacetyl rest, that is, if you want to reduce the diacetyl level. Many people find it objectionable, but it does have its place in small amounts in a Bohemian pilsner, for example.
 

Busted Still Brewery
Advanced Member
Username: Brewlabs

Post Number: 541
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 04:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

just let me state that this is an ale.

I thought i remembered hearing that for ales you want to bring it to about room temp to allow the yeast to finish it's job, otherwise it takes a little longer for the yeast to eat the last of the last fermentables.
 

Ken Anderson
Intermediate Member
Username: Ken75

Post Number: 500
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 04:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've tried like hell to detect the buttered popcorn flavor in my lagers, but haven't been able to. Maybe the strains I've used have kept me from it. Or maybe my taster isn't sensitive to it. None of my friends or family has noticed it either, though.
I have a hunch that a lot of people raise the temperature at the end of fermentation just as a matter of course. And because George Fix says it's so, and also because it sounds pretty cool to say you did a diacetyl rest.
Incidently, I did the famous diacetyl rest three days ago, followed by crash cooling to 35F. The beer is still in the boil kettle, and I guess by definition it is now undergoing lagering. I swear I'll report honestly on the outcome!
Ken
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 1405
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 04:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Assuming a reasonable temperature (in the low 60s F or above), most ale strains should be able to complete fermentation without problems.
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1019
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Friday, December 10, 2004 - 04:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That is why I raise the temp if my ales, just to make sure it finishes completely. Not really to speed things up.

-Doug