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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2004 * Archive through December 31, 2004 * Best Yeast for a Cream ale < Previous Next >

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David Beckerdite
Intermediate Member
Username: Darkislandfan

Post Number: 257
Registered: 04-2003
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 03:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well as the subject title states, I would like to ask the collective their opinion. I am looking for a yeast that will give me a clean crisp taste in my cream ale.
Each Day brings a new beginning....Thank God for beer!
David B
 

George Schmidt
Intermediate Member
Username: Gschmidt

Post Number: 301
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 03:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wy 1056/WL001 no question. The most neutral ale yeast, IMO. The colder, the better.
Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors -- and miss. ~~Robert A. Heinlein: The Notebooks of Lazarus Long
 

Dan Listermann
Advanced Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 819
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 03:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nottingham for dry, California for liquid. Nothing that produces much friutness.

Dan Listermann
 

David Beckerdite
Intermediate Member
Username: Darkislandfan

Post Number: 258
Registered: 04-2003
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 04:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks,

Does anyone know what yeast strain Wexford uses for their Irish Cream Ale?
Each Day brings a new beginning....Thank God for beer!
David B
 

Richard Nye
Intermediate Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 423
Registered: 01-2004
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 11:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

David, I just cracked a keg of Skotrat's Genesee My Butt! cream ale. His recipe calls for WY2035 (American Lager yeast), but I made it with Nottingham and fermented it at 62F, the lagered for about a month at 32F. Tastes great.
 

Obadiah Poundage
Junior Member
Username: Obadiah_poundage

Post Number: 44
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The following White Labs yeast should all work-California, Australian, and American Ale. You may also want to give their San Francisco Lager yeast a go for this style as well.
 

davidw
Advanced Member
Username: Davidw

Post Number: 784
Registered: 03-2001
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 04:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wyeast 1338. Nice and malty.
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1059
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 04:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Maybe I have this wrong, but in my mind if you use a lager yeast on a Cream Ale you have made something more like a CAP or American Lager.

-Doug
 

Wykowski
Senior Member
Username: Bigearl

Post Number: 1222
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 05:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Maybe I have this wrong, but in my mind if you use a lager yeast on a Cream Ale you have made something more like a CAP or American Lager. "

perhaps this would be so if logic was applied, but this is brewing and I belive many commercial CAs are actually lagers

I use 1056/001
You remember that foul evening when you heard the banshees howl
There was lousy drunken bastards singing 'Billy is in the bowl'
They took you up to midnight mass and left you in the lurch
So you dropped a button in the plate and spewed up in the church

 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 2609
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 06:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I made one this fall with WY1007 that came out excellent.
 

Ken Anderson
Advanced Member
Username: Ken75

Post Number: 562
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 06:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are there any laws in America regarding the labeling of beers? I'm talking as far as types and style.
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1061
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 06:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ken,
Back in the late 80s and early 90s in NJ any beer above 5% (at least that is the percent I remember) alcohol had to be labeled as Malt Liquor. This really pissed off the importers of the Japanese dry beers which were all over 5%. I am sure this has changed by now because last time I was up there I saw SNPA instead of SNML.

-Doug
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 1617
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 06:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The successor agency to the BATF still must approve the design of beer labels. The courts struck down restrictions on listing the alcohol content, but it is not required. There are no regulations about what constitutes styles. Beer does have to contain minimum amounts of malt and hops, although these are quite small.

Some states continue to restrict the alcohol content of what can be sold as beer. A few of them (Texas and Oklahoma come to mind) oddly require stronger beers to be labelled as "ale." Obviously the authors of such rules never drank a doppelbock.
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 3990
Registered: 01-2001
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 06:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There are all kinds of laws, like the TX law that makes beers over a certain alcohol content be labelled as "ales", no matter what they are. IIRC, BWs have to be labelled as barley wine style, so people don't think they're really wine!
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Arthur
Junior Member
Username: Arthur

Post Number: 27
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 06:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In New York State, Spaten is labeled in teeny weeny 2-point type as malt liquor.
 

Obadiah Poundage
Junior Member
Username: Obadiah_poundage

Post Number: 45
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 08:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Doug, many people cold condition their cream ales for several weeks. The only difference I see between cold conditioning and lagering is the amount of time.
With WL San Francisco lager yeast you can ferment as high as 64F or as low as 52F (generally), therefore it makes a good 'tweener type of yeast for the cream ale style IMHO.
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1062
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 08:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm not sure how I should respond to OP's post. Yes, I cold condition my cream ales and yes I cold condition my lagers. But what separates the two for me is the lager yeast vs. the ale yeast. The only difference between my cream ale and my CAP is the yeast, the grain bills are nearly identical. I thought that was the point, that a cream ale is just a CAP (or some variation of a CAP) done with an ale yeast.

I did state that I could be wrongly thinking this in my original post.

-Doug
 

Chris Vejnovich
Junior Member
Username: Cjv85vmax

Post Number: 72
Registered: 06-2003
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 08:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I really like WLP007. I once split a 10 gallon batch of Cream Ale between WLP007 and WLP001. I liked the 007 beer much better. I thought it had a little dryer taste.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 1618
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 09:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Excerpted in part from the 2004 BJCP Style Guidelines for Cream Ale (Category 6A):

An ale version of the American lager style. Produced by ale brewers to compete with lager brewers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic States. Originally known as sparkling or present use ales, lager strains were (and sometimes still are) used by some brewers, but were not historically mixed with ale strains. Many examples are kräusened to achieve carbonation. Cold conditioning isn't traditional, although modern brewers sometimes use it.
 

Kevin Davis
Member
Username: Ktdavis98

Post Number: 162
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Wednesday, December 29, 2004 - 12:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am drinking one right now that used Nottingham, and it is awsome. It tasted a little too corny at kegging, but after only a few days of cold conditioning it is great. I also split the batch with Wyeast 1338, and I have not tried it yet. I will tap it New Years Eve, but if it turns out any better, I don't see how.
Kevin
 

GaryP6
Junior Member
Username: Garyp6

Post Number: 51
Registered: 05-2003
Posted on Wednesday, December 29, 2004 - 04:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

David,

The White Labs website has some additional recommendations that real look interesting...

white labs
 

Astro
Junior Member
Username: Astro

Post Number: 47
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Thursday, December 30, 2004 - 05:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My latest batch of CACA was fermented with WLP008, 'East Coast Ale'. I've used it with honey wheats in the past with great results and decided to give it a try. I like the result.

WLP008 is becoming one of my favorite yeasts. Oddly enough, I've never seen it recommended here on the board for any style. Anybody have any comments on this yeast?
 

Geoff Buschur
Intermediate Member
Username: Avmech

Post Number: 417
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Thursday, December 30, 2004 - 02:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Funny you should mention WLP008. I have used it for three batches in a row now, an Imperial Honey Cream Ale, DC RyePA, and an Amber Ale. There seems to be a consistent flavor among all three batches and I'm not sure exactly how to describe it.

The IHCA was fermented at the highest temp (~73F) and has the strongest mystery flavor. It also really accentuates the corn and honey and makes this beer less enjoyable. There were other problems with this batch of beer so it really isn’t all that valid other than the flavor that is consistent with the other batches

The DC RyePA was fermented around 69F and has less of this mystery flavor. I dry hopped with an extra ounce of Columbus in the keg and now the mystery flavor is disguised by an overabundance of Columbus .

Finally, the Amber Ale started out around 62F and finished around 55F. I could only taste the mystery flavor in my samples from secondary. Now that it is chilled and carbonated and dry hopped I barely detect the flavor.

Once I kick this cold I have right now I will do a tasting with all three side by side and see if I can still detect a consistent flavor. I might even throw in a Sam Adams to see if I can taste it in their brew too.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 1320
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Thursday, December 30, 2004 - 04:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just used it for a couple of batches too. The first being Irish American Red ale and the second a chili beer. Not sure I can pin any flavor in the red to the yeast. Mostly the 6 row and maize. And you sure can't pick up any yeast flavors in the chili beer

Seems like the only reason I used it was they were out of Irish yeast. I think this is the Sam Adams ale yeast?