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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through January 29, 2005 * Splitting propane line for 2-burner control < Previous Next >

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Vince Turley
Junior Member
Username: Vince

Post Number: 99
Registered: 05-2003
Posted on Monday, January 24, 2005 - 07:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am in the final stages of finishing my 2-tier brewstand, and am about to begin running the gas plumbing to drive the HLT and BK. I plan to remove the gas assembly (threaded propane connector, valve, and flexible black gas hose) from my “turkey fryer” burner stand, and replace the end (where the burner was connected) with a brass “T” fitting. From this “T”, I plan to connect soft copper tubing (1/4”?) and run this out to each burner (HLT, BK). Towards the end of each run, I plan to install a brass needle valve to control burner output.

Anyone see any problems or issues with this approach? I am just looking for confirmation/validation that I am approaching the construction of this sub-system correctly. Also, will I be able to control the output of each burner independent of the other with this setup (i.e. low setting on one burner, wide open on the other) without any issue?

Thanks all. I’ll post pics of the complete brewstand build project in a few weeks when we make our maiden run. This certainly has been a fun project!

-Vince
 

Belly Buster Bob
Senior Member
Username: Canman

Post Number: 2048
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Monday, January 24, 2005 - 07:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vince..this is exactly how mine is plumbed. Just be careful to do a good leak check prior to firing up
Bellybuster Bob
www.bellybuster.netfirms.com
 

Vince Turley
Junior Member
Username: Vince

Post Number: 100
Registered: 05-2003
Posted on Monday, January 24, 2005 - 08:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for validating Bob, and for the advice - will do.

-Vince
 

Pete Mazurowski
Junior Member
Username: Pete_maz

Post Number: 34
Registered: 07-2003
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 12:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vince, this is exactly how mine is plumbed as well. Regulator to flare "T", with each side going to a needle valve, then to burner. I just finished mine and I'm ready to leak check.

The only thing I would do is state what might be the obvious: use flare or NPT fittings (I don't think they recommend compression for gas connections) and use the special high density gas line tape (usually yellow), not the usual white tape that's used for water lines. There are probably plenty of other options, but make sure they're ok for gas lines. Good luck and let us know how it turns out!
 

Vince Turley
Member
Username: Vince

Post Number: 101
Registered: 05-2003
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 01:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Pete... I was going to go with compression fittings by default since that is what I'm familiar with, I'll certainly look into either flare or NPT when I'm at HD this weekend. Good points, and yes I'll keep ya'll posted when we do the maiden run on the new brewstand.

Cheers!
-Vince
 

Belly Buster Bob
Senior Member
Username: Canman

Post Number: 2052
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 02:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vince...compression fittings are "not" gas tight. don't use'm you will regret it...possibly in a real bad way. I didn't realise you were using compression fittings
Bellybuster Bob
www.bellybuster.netfirms.com
 

Ron Siddall
Junior Member
Username: Listerdister

Post Number: 94
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 03:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sweat the copper joints. Easy to do.

Belly Buster....Since a water molecule is much smaller than a propane molecule, why would compression fittings not work? IF they are water tight, they should be gas tight as well, right?
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 1389
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There's thread sealers that are a liquid/paste that are gas rated. Not sure why but compression fittings are not to code for gas. Just get a flaring tool. They're easy to use.

I had a compression fitting start to leak this weekend. When I took it apart the compression ring was full of cracks. Maybe why they aren't good for gas.
 

Rob Farrell
Member
Username: Robf

Post Number: 235
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 05:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ron,
Liquid water behaves very differently than gases due to its high surface tension. Never assume water-tight means gas tight.
 

Belly Buster Bob
Senior Member
Username: Canman

Post Number: 2055
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 06:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

ya...surface tension and all that stuff...don't doubt me ron!!!!!!
Bellybuster Bob
www.bellybuster.netfirms.com
 

Ron Siddall
Junior Member
Username: Listerdister

Post Number: 98
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 06:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So that is where that gas smell is coming from! And I thought it was the dog.

I will have to go back and check my fittings as I cannot remember what I did.
 

Pete Mazurowski
Junior Member
Username: Pete_maz

Post Number: 35
Registered: 07-2003
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 06:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Interesting too, I was just reading the label on the top of my yellow sealing tape last night, and saw that it said "minimum three turns". Meaning wrap it around the joint at least three times to get a good seal. I had only been wrapping a little over one time. Maybe this falls into the "Shampoo. Rinse. Repeat." category?
 

Ron Siddall
Junior Member
Username: Listerdister

Post Number: 99
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Not doubting you Belly Buster. Just demonstrating how a little knowledge can get someone in a heap of trouble - me!
 

Walt Fischer
Senior Member
Username: Walt

Post Number: 1984
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 07:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

yea.. i used compression fittings when i built mine, and after testing, i did find a few tiny leaks...
i solved it by sweating every compression joint closed with solder...
Pressure testing showed no leaking.. and i have repeat the pressure test every once n awhile just to make sure...
Alls been fine...:-)

However, if i was to rebuild, i would use flare next time....

Walt
Lama Brewery
 

Vince Turley
Member
Username: Vince

Post Number: 102
Registered: 05-2003
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 11:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok, flare fittings it is then. Walt, how did you pressure test your system? I was thinking I would validate each union by spraying StarSan on the connection with the tank valve open and check for bubbles - will this work? Is there a better way?
 

Ralph Diamond
Junior Member
Username: Rdiamond

Post Number: 33
Registered: 06-2003
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 11:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

wait a sec did I read correctly?

"I plan to remove the gas assembly (threaded propane connector, valve, and flexible black gas hose)"

What is pressure that turns propane to a liquid (i think CO2 is 800lbs) Can you control liquid gas pressure with sweated copper fittings or is a high pressure regulator required? there is a low and a high pressure reg.
 

Bill Moore
Intermediate Member
Username: Bill_beerman

Post Number: 265
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 - 02:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vince,
Soapy water is easy way to check for leaks.
You'll see bubbles if there are any.
Used by gas line plumbers all the time.
 

Belly Buster Bob
Senior Member
Username: Canman

Post Number: 2056
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 - 02:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ralph...I think you are misreading...he's going to dissassemble "post regulator"......I hope
Bellybuster Bob
www.bellybuster.netfirms.com
 

Vince Turley
Member
Username: Vince

Post Number: 103
Registered: 05-2003
Posted on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 - 01:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ralph-
What I meant is that I removed my regulator and rubber gas line as an intact unit from the burner on my turkey fryer stand. Then, in place of the burner, I am going to place a brass "T" fitting to split the lines.