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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through March 16, 2005 * Drinking Temperature < Previous Next >

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Arthur
Junior Member
Username: Arthur

Post Number: 59
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 03:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This thought I share with you relates to the consumption of my English-style house amber, which I make with TF malt solely, English-style yeast, and English hops. (I haven't had Spitfire or Bishop's Finger in a long time -- no longer available where I live -- but it's probably tastes like these ales.)

To continue, I drank a bottle of it with only 1 hour of refridgeration. The beer was cool, but by no means cold. The beer was still crystal clear without chill haze. To sum it up, the taste was magficient. The beer had much more malt, hops, and colateral flavor that are otherwise muted when cold.

I now know why the British prefer to drink their style ale around 50F. I wouldn't try this with Piels Real Draft.

The last time I had a Piels was in 1984, when a case of 16 ounce returnable, refillable bottles was $5. We left the case in the trunk of the car on a very cold January night, 5F. The beer was so cold, it was impalatably palatable -- if you know what I mean. Very refreshing under the circumstances. Nostalgia
 

jim williams
Member
Username: Jim

Post Number: 174
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 03:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is why my beer fridge stays at 45deg, and I've been known to pop a poured beer in the microwave for 10sec. or so
 

Wykowski
Senior Member
Username: Bigearl

Post Number: 1247
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 03:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just can't get used to "warm" beer, unless it's a Stout
You remember that foul evening when you heard the banshees howl
There was lousy drunken bastards singing 'Billy is in the bowl'
They took you up to midnight mass and left you in the lurch
So you dropped a button in the plate and spewed up in the church

 

Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 1261
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 04:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Only quelque chose!

I even prefer cask beer a little cooler than the 50-55 that is 'recommended'...

Back in the high school daze, I had a guinness extra stout that was about 80 degrees (desperate). Turned me off stouts for some time...
 

Dan Listermann
Advanced Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 931
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 04:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have been tasting prototype batches using different yeasts with the same wort. Tasting them at room temperature really exposes faults and features. I figure if it is good at room temperature, it will be great cooler but not cold temperatures like American beer.

Dan Listermann
 

Mark Bushey
Member
Username: Spiff95

Post Number: 145
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 04:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I remember someone (it might have been Chumley) posting something about temp & taste a while back. He suggested that if you took a can of Bud and iced it down, the stuff would taste little different from water. If you took another can and chilled it to around 45-50F, the malt (what little there is) and hop flavors would come forward.
I tried this experiment with my Amber Ale, and indeed noticed a difference in flavor. Since then, I drink most of my beers (Cream Ale included) around 45F.
Mark
--Artificial Intelligence is no match for Organic Stupidity.
 

Dan Listermann
Advanced Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 932
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 05:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

American light beer cannot be drank at room temperature.

Dan Listermann
 

Ken Anderson
Advanced Member
Username: Ken75

Post Number: 758
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 05:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan, are you using ale or lager yeasts, and how pronounced are the differences?
 

David Lewinnek
Junior Member
Username: Davelew

Post Number: 33
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 05:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recently compared a bottle of homebrewed brown ale from my fridge (~35F) to a bottle from my cellar (~60F). The cellar beer was qualitatively better in every aspect, except that it was overcarbonated.

The next time I bottle an English or Belgian style, I plan to leave out 1/3 of the priming sugar so it will be easier to serve at 60F.
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 2014
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 05:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My xmas porter that I was very happy with this x-mas, was really tasty full malty,roasted,plummy flavours and at it was probably best around 55F up to 59F is was great too. As cold as 46F wasnt fair to the good aroma. It was good, but it wasn't until I tried it at 55-59F I noticed how complex and great the aroma was.

I have to say I changed, I used to like only cold beer (say < 45F) but lately I have started to enjoy many beers more closer to 55F. This was particularly true for my xmas porter.

But I still prefer lager beers cold.

My first beers I made tasted best cold, and somehow some flaws seems more apparent when the beer is not too cold. This is why I was pretty proud of the xmas porter that was very tasty even warmer. I might have done some slight changes to the receipe if I brew it again though and replace some of the hardest roasted grains with some more chocolate malt.

/Fredrik
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 2604
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 05:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The local brewpub (really more a bistro with a few of their own beers) serves the beer in the low 40s F, somewhat cold for my taste, so I let the glass sit for a few minutes. They say most of their customers don't like it too warm. However, for a brewer's night dinner, they had their mild ale on the hand pump at 54 F. It was wonderful, full of flavor and very satisfying for a 3.5 percent alcohol by volume beer.

(Message edited by BillPierce on March 10, 2005)
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 2855
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 05:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

>>it might have been Chumley

It wasn't me. I agree with Dan, factory-brewed megaswill can only be drank at near freezing temperature.
 

Dan Listermann
Advanced Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 933
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 07:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We finished up an "Old Speckled Hen" clone settling on Mumton's Gold ( surprise, surprise.) Three of the other four had faults. Cooper's was good too.

We are not starting a Swarzbier using lager yeasts. Haven't tasted it yet, waiting of WLP 830 to finish. We have decided to not use that one simply because it is so slow.

Had some Fuller's "London Pride" the other night. It might be the next one when the fermenters free up.

Dan Listermann
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 1483
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 08:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've got the bartender at my local brewpub trained to take a room temp glass and run it under warm water before filling. Makes the beer just the right temp.

I think a lot of people trying stouts or IPAs the first time get turned off because they are served too cold. Oughhh, they're too bitter...
Not when they're served at the right temps.
 

Jim Keaveney
Advanced Member
Username: Jimkeaveney

Post Number: 596
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 08:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Vance: I would think the opposite is true...you can't taste the characteristics of a beer when it is too cold. be it bitterness/flavor/aroma in an ipa or roastiness/cofee/chocolate... flavors in a stout. i think a beer goes down "easier" when it is cold. not to imply that it is better, it is blander actually.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 1485
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 10:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've actually seen people taste a cold IPA and say it was too bitter, then let it sit around a while cause they didn't like it, and then taste it latter and think it was great. Just my personal exp. I agree the flavors come out more when warmer. But I also find that when cold all you sometimes can taste is a harsh bitterness.

(Message edited by vancebarnes on March 10, 2005)
 

Sand
Member
Username: Sand

Post Number: 141
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 10:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

BW at 60f mmmmmmmm...........
 

michael atkins
Member
Username: Mga

Post Number: 107
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 11:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

FWIW -- When I was stationed in Europe in the late 1960's (Germany), all bottled beer was served at room temperature. Bottled beer was rarely refrigerated, and keg or cask beer was served probably from storage -- somewhere in the shade.

This was true in France, England, A-Dam (The Netherlands) Austria and Spain.

My fridge is set for 40d. After I pour I like to leave it set awhile, to adjust upward to whatever temperature I like.
 

Marlon Lang
Intermediate Member
Username: Marlonlang

Post Number: 451
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 01:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Whoa, Michael. Things in the vaterland be different now. Ein bier on the K-Dam will be 15C. In a CAMRA-advertised pub, the cask-ale will be 55F or nitro. A UK "lager" will be 40F, or colder. In Dortmund. "Ein Pils" will be 10-15C. There is just no respect for tradition!
 

michael atkins
Member
Username: Mga

Post Number: 108
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 01:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Marlon -- It makes you question what we are trying to imitate -- (beers from the past), when we can"t even go back 40 years and rely on serving temperatures.
 

robert rulmyr
Advanced Member
Username: Wacobob

Post Number: 512
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 11:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This seems to be something we all agree on. Anything besides ice cold is a good thing!
 

Beerboy AKA The Jolly Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 635
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 12:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm a real ale drinker here in England. Most, but not all beer is served at what is called celler temp. 10-15C (sorry, I was born after decimalisation, I don't know the F equivalent) which to me is just right. Cool enought to be refreshing but warm enough to taste everything.

However, lager definitely tastes better cold. About 9C.

Guinness is starting to be served 'Extra Cold' now. Almost by default. If, shudder, I'm in a pub without real ale, I'll opt for Guinness, but I have to remember to ask for 'normal' Guinness, which is too cold anyway, or I'll end up with superchilled black stuff, and get rude comments from the barstaff when I send it back.

I serve all my ales at home at cellar temp too, I have a cellar so they are served from there, they pretty much peak at about 16-17C in the summer which is fine by me. But I also have a fridge which I serve lagers from.

I'm going to Nashville/Memphis/New Orleans at the end of may for a couple of weeks and intend to go to a couple of brewpubs including Boscos, while I'm looking forward to trying the beers I'm not looking forward to waiting 10 minutes at the bar until the beer is the right temperature. I may have to remember that run the galss under the hot tap trick. I'll just play up the 'Eccentric Englishman' image.

Just a side note. I've not tried many American beers but those I've tried I've drunk at 'my' ideal serving temperature and most of them have been of a very high quality so I really am looking forward to trying the beer from the source as it were. That is what I find rather confusing by the American habit of serving their beers so cold - Why spend all that time and effort brewing top quality ales and then serving them so cold all the flavour and subtlety is gone.
 

Mike Huss
Advanced Member
Username: Mikhu

Post Number: 517
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 01:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Why spend all that time and effort brewing top quality ales and then serving them so cold all the flavour and subtlety is gone."

It's called cluelessness Beerboy! Far too many people here have been convinced by the marketing types that all beer needs to be served ice cold in frosted mugs. Which, when drinking BMC, is fine since it tastes like water anyway and water is better cold, but unfortunately this marketing causes the uninformed masses to think all beer is supposed to be served ice cold. It's merely a simple lack of knowledge and experience.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 1487
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 01:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Beerboy, make sure you tell them to take a ROOM TEMP glass and rinse it with warm water. I had a numbnuts bartender once that took a glass out of the cooler and rinsed it with hot water. Guess what? IT BROKE.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 2614
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 02:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Beerboy, the Bosco's pubs usually have at least one real ale on the handpump. It will be served at the proper temperature and carbonation level. Enjoy your trip. I wouldn't call Nashville, Memphis or New Orleans beer meccas, but they are unique American cities each with something to offer a visitor. I hope you eat as well or better than you drink.
 

Beerboy AKA The Jolly Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 637
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 02:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeah, that's another thing - as if the beer wasn't cold enough already, it's served in frosted glass! Talk about overkill!!!!!

And Bill, I've looked at the Bosco's website and am reallyy looking forward to tasting their real ale. I've emailed them and hopefully I'll get a look around their brewery as well.

We are going to Memphis for a friends wedding (Elvis fan) so thought it would be a good opportunity for a road trip so we are going to the Memphis, Nashville and New Orleans for a musical whirlwind tour as well as lots of BBQ, gumbo, jambalaya, crayfish and whatever other culinary delights are in store. For me the beer will be a bonus, the wife is not a beer drinker so I'll have to drag her where I want to drink!
 

jim williams
Member
Username: Jim

Post Number: 175
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 03:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

this is a great thread. I think it's partly cluelessness, but, also, just plain habit. I find most brewpubs and beer bars serve their beer way too cold too. this is from a place supposedly serving great beers, and they are, just too damn cold! I generally order two beers at the same time. One to wrap my warm hands around for awhile, the other to allow to warm up a bit before drinking.

Maybe, another problem is this whole gotta have 129 beers on tap nonsense. With so many beers on tap, there's no way they could have the turnover to allow the beer not to go off, so, they hafve to serve and store cold, or it will! I hate those "multi taps" and brewpubs that'll have so many beers on tap. Why not have 5-7 of a good variety all done perfectly and served at the correct temperature than all those taps? sheeesh!

DBA in NYC is a great example of a beer bar done right. 10 taps. a couple pumps and a huge bottled list. That's the way to do it!
 

Mike Huss
Advanced Member
Username: Mikhu

Post Number: 518
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 03:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mmmmmm....cajun and BBQ....life will be really good during your trip!!
 

Beerboy AKA The Jolly Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 641
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

129 beers!!!

That is just ridiculous. Even if you had 5 a night it would take you 26 nights to try them all.

Like Jim said, have 5-7 on the go and rotate them on a regular basis so you still have a good range, just not all at one time. Or have 3 regulars and a a rotation on 4 other taps.
}

(Message edited by matfink on March 11, 2005)
 

Beerboy AKA The Jolly Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 642
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 04:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry about the last post - dont know what went on there!