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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through March 25, 2005 * What am I making? < Previous Next >

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J. Steinhauer
Advanced Member
Username: Jstein6870

Post Number: 586
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 04:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Snugglebird Pale Ale

A ProMash Brewing Session - Recipe Details Report

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (Gal): 5.50 Wort Size (Gal): 5.50
Total Grain (kg): 4.45
Anticipated OG: 1.052 Plato: 12.95
Anticipated SRM: 8.7
Anticipated IBU: 69.3
Brewhouse Efficiency: 80 %
Wort Boil Time: 75 Minutes

Formulas Used
-------------

Brewhouse Efficiency and Predicted Gravity based on Method #1, Potential Used.
Final Gravity Calculation Based on Points.
Hard Value of Sucrose applied. Value for recipe: 46.2100 ppppg
Yield Type used in Gravity Prediction: Fine Grind Dry Basis.

Color Formula Used: Morey
Hop IBU Formula Used: Tinseth
Tinseth Concentration Factor: 1.30


Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
89.9 4.00 kg. Golden Promise Great Britain 1.037 2
10.1 0.45 kg. Crystal 55L Great Britian 1.034 55

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
14.00 g. Warrior Pellet 15.60 26.4 60 min.
22.00 g. Warrior Pellet 15.60 25.1 20 min.
26.00 g. Warrior Pellet 15.60 17.8 10 min.
26.00 g. Warrior Pellet 15.60 0.0 0 min.


Amount Name Type Time
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.00 Unit(s)Whirlfloc Tablets Fining 15 Min.(boil)


Yeast
-----

White Labs WLP013 London Ale


You call it what you like. I'm callin' it a pale ale!

See what I mean?
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 2021
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 11:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

69 IBU? :-) What do you typically eat to that? I'd imagine something really hot and spicy to have a chance to compete with that bitterness? Maybe burning chicken wings that are litteraly soaking in tabasco maybe? :-)

/Fredrik


(Message edited by fredrik on March 16, 2005)
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 2680
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 12:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'd call it "On the War Path" (all those Warriors).
 

Richard Nye
Advanced Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 605
Registered: 01-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 01:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Or maybe "4 little Indians"
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 2022
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 02:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill, I know you like leffe blonde and some other beers that I find to be excellent, so that makes me think your preferences isn't that far from what mine in some cases. I am curious to hear what you like really bitter beers? I am asking since you have alot of experience and I am thinking that maybe experience changes your preferences? I simply don't like excessively bitter beers, except possibly and rarely with correspondingly extreme food. But I have changed somewhat in my beer preferences since I started brewing. Is extreme bitterness something that you typically like more and more?

I usually like very hot and spicy food, and flavourful beers otherwise, but the high bitterness usually gives my tounge cramps.

/Fredirk
 

Mike Huss
Advanced Member
Username: Mikhu

Post Number: 529
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 02:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Fredrik, I'm not Bill nor do I play him on tv, but IMHO it's an acquired taste. I used to think MGD was a filling and heavy beer! These days I actually love real big beers, and the hoppier the better. When I first starting liking better beer I thought ESB's were too strong and didn't really like them. Now I spend my life searching for IIPA's and the like. It all grows on you. For example, I think Steihauer's recipe sounds awesome! Just unbalanced enough on the hoppy side to be really crisp and tasty!

(Message edited by mikhu on March 16, 2005)

(Message edited by mikhu on March 16, 2005)
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1233
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 02:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Fredrik,
I am not Mike nor am I Bill, but I do enjoy a sharp bitter beer when the temperatures head north of 85F (like today). My taste is generally on the neutral/balanced side for easy drinking beers at night, but when you are exposed to the heat and stupidity of south florida a crisp and bitter lager hits the spot.

-Doug
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 2023
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 02:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Mike. That makes sense and it's interesting. I am more of a candy man I guess. I like it more on the darker, maltier and sweeter side of things, I still like a good bitterness balance, but I guess I'm more over on the sweet side as compared to the IPA at least.

No offense to Steinhauer, I'm sure he makes great beer but to me that receipe looks horribly bitter to me and something you'd have to use a brush to get off your tounge :-)

I have actually started to like somewhat more bitter beers since I started to brew! However I have a long way to come to 69 IBU.

/Fredrik
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 2024
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 03:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The heat thing was interesting Doug. Hmm it never occured to me before, but maybe I should try one of the beers I usually don't like some warm day. Mmm, it does have a clear logic to it, I just never thought of it before - sweetness and heat seem to intuitively end up on the same side. So perhaps a sweet beer would similarly taste better on a cold winter day.

I guess we don't near the heat, or humidity in Sweden that you get.

/Fredrik
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 2682
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 03:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I might find Steinhauer's recipe a little too bitter for my taste. I'm not a huge hophead, and I like my bitter beers to be supported by malt. But I don't want to reject his beer out of hand. If I tried it I might actually like it. Bitter beers have their place. As you suggest, they complement spicy foods well and sometimes they can be oddly refreshing. I can think of several bitter beers I like quite a bit. Sister Star of the Sun is a wonderful IPA in my opinion, and I'm very fond of Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale. One of these days (I'm waiting to have the space and brewing capacity in my location) I promise I'm going to brew Denny's Rye IPA.

On the other hand, my wife dislikes hops. All of her favorite beers have little if any hop character. She's fond of most Belgians and German wheat beers. She says she can recognize that SNCA and Orval are good beers but would greatly prefer them if they were less hoppy.

So it's obviously a matter of taste, and I do believe that some women are more sensitive to hops than men, although there are clearly exceptions.

(Message edited by BillPierce on March 16, 2005)
 

Mike Huss
Advanced Member
Username: Mikhu

Post Number: 531
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 04:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes Bill that is true, because in our house you have just the opposite where my wife is a bigger hophead than most guys I know. In fact, she liked ESB's (not that they are hoppy compared to an IPA, but you know what I'm getting at) before I did. She loves such delicacies as Two Hearted, SNCA, AB, etc.

I'm so proud of her!!
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 2025
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 05:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

From what you've written before your wife seem to have a good taste for balanced beers Bill.

I don't know how come but while I don't like bitterness alot, I can easily flood my dinner plate in hot pepper sauce and enjoy it. I have thought of this as a contradiction but I figure the difference is that I like the instant "punch" of the bitterness hitting the tounge, but I dislike the aftertaste of bitter compounds sticking on the toungh. As long as the beer is covered with flowing beer it's better but when you stop and feel the bitterness crimple your tounge is the worst part to me.

/Fredrik
 

davidw
Advanced Member
Username: Davidw

Post Number: 975
Registered: 03-2001
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 05:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sixty-nine IBU's?

Childs play.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 2887
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 05:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Snugglebird Pale Ale" - is there a contest going on for the pukiest-sounding beer name? If so, I want to enter. How about "Pootie Pie Porter"? "Love Muffin Lager"?
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 2685
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 05:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's also something of an intercontinental distinction. Americans clearly like hops more than Europeans. I'm hard pressed to think of continental styles other than some Czech pilsners and Dusseldorf altbier that Americans would call bitter. As far I can tell, most of the historical IPAs were probably bittered in the 40-50 IBU range, which I'm sure was considered very bitter at the time. The few recent British beers that have a lot of hop presence are craft brewed and promoted as being in the "American style."

On the other hand, any number of American "imperial IPAs" push the bittering envelope to the solubility limit of isomerized alpha acids in wort (90-100 IBUs). Some seek to increase the hop presence beyond that, with Dogfish Head's "Randall the Enamel Animal" dispensing the beer through a bed of whole hops in the housing for a commercial water filter.

As I have said repeatedly, I prefer my hops to be supported by sufficient malt to have a semblance of balance. But few Europeans have accused Americans of being subtle about anything, and this seems to be no exception.

At any rate, I also ascribe my wife being European (she was born and raised in Romania), as well as her gender, as reasons she is not fond of hoppy beers.

(Message edited by BillPierce on March 16, 2005)
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 2888
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 06:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Europeans don't brew 100 IBU beers because their hops suck for 100 IBU beers. Even the best of their hops, Saaz, would require about pound of them in a five gallon batch at 3.5%.

English hops: Imagine a 100 IBU ale brewed with Target, Challenger or Northdown?!? Bleccch.

Thank you, oh PNW hop growers, for giving us the C-hops and all their cousins.
 

Mike Huss
Advanced Member
Username: Mikhu

Post Number: 532
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 06:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

5 stars Chumley!
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 2889
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 06:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm thinking that "India Pale Ale" is a poor name for the newer American imperial or Double IPAs. That's a mouthful in itself. Plus, they don't taste any thing like those awful British IPAs. Anyways, what do those curry-chomping, cow-worshiping Indians know about hops? They probably can't even grow them.

Methinks "Freedom Pale Ale" would be a better name for our 100+ IBU American IPAs.
 

Roger Herpst
Junior Member
Username: Roger456

Post Number: 58
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 08:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Since when did the French brew a hoppy pale ale??

Chumley, I do agree with you that the IPA designation is a bit silly given how much the style seems to have changed since the American craft brew renaissance.

How about PNW Pale Ale? Not very orignial, doesn't roll off the tongue too easily, but it is maybe a bit more accurate.
 

Roger Herpst
Junior Member
Username: Roger456

Post Number: 59
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 08:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Or we could reform the bittering unit system. How about 100 IBUs equal 1 ABU (American Bittering Unit). After all, we do like things bigger here, and we do sometimes tend to leave a bitter aftertaste around the globe.
 

Marlon Lang
Intermediate Member
Username: Marlonlang

Post Number: 460
Registered: 03-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 17, 2005 - 01:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Gents,
This thread really defines the true meaning of home brew and home brewers. We all have our preferences yet we all appreciate that others may differ from ours. I'm drinking one of Bill's Trois Pistoles as I write this, but a week from now I'll be in Denny's country enjoying Terminal Gravity pale ale. Ain't life good?
 

J. Steinhauer
Advanced Member
Username: Jstein6870

Post Number: 589
Registered: 03-2002
Posted on Thursday, March 17, 2005 - 03:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Totally Cool!

I'm no hophead either, but I like to have something to tickle my tongue on the tap. What better to have next to a saison, a Northern brown and some Eurolager. I do brew "balanced" bitter beers, too.

What I was really getting at, though, was the (IM cynicalO) overconcern with "what did I make?" That ain't no pale ale recipe, so it can't be "true", and I've never tried it before, so it can't be "tried", either. It will be GOOD, though, and it will be different from anything I've ever had before, and I will call it a pale ale.

I really just want everyone to relax and brew some great beer and enjoy it without worrying about what kind it is. I used to worry about that style stuff, too, but this past near-year of brewing, just doing different things has been the most fun brewing I've ever done.

Yeah Marlon, life is good!