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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through August 15, 2005 * Fridge Controllers - an interesting observation and theory < Previous Next >

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Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 1389
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.31.197
Posted on Thursday, August 11, 2005 - 08:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In a conversation with a customer a few minutes ago, he mentioned that his primary fermentation fridge's controller went bad on him after four years. It seems that it lost its "charge." He said that it looked like something had eaten at the bulb to the point that a hole developed in it letting the gas get out. His theory was that the moisture and CO2 in the enclosed space formed carbonic acid or something and eat a hole. Anybody else ever hear of this sort of thing. We have one in a fridge that we store yeast in for about 7 years and it appears fine.

Dan
Listermann Mfg.,Co. www.listermann.com

 

George Schmidt
Advanced Member
Username: Gschmidt

Post Number: 580
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 68.249.96.114
Posted on Thursday, August 11, 2005 - 10:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just got one and noticed that it changed color in a couple weeks from touching the aluminum interior walls of the freezer. Galvanic corrosion with the copper probe. I could certainly imagine it eating a hole over time if it continued.
Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors -- and miss. ~~Robert A. Heinlein: The Notebooks of Lazarus Long
 

Steve Funk
Junior Member
Username: Tundra45

Post Number: 88
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 209.216.179.5
Posted on Thursday, August 11, 2005 - 10:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've noticed a bit of corrosion on my Johnson controller's sensor after many years of use. It developed the most when I used to leave it immersed in a bottle of water to curtail compressor cycling. Now, I just secure it on the outside of the fermenter with the giant o-ring seal from a discarded 5-gallon bucked lid. I don't want to watch it slowly erode away. How about smearing some protective silicone-based grease on it? I've also thought about dipping it in that liquid rubber substance sold at auto parts stores for tool handles. Any other ideas?

Steve
Stevenson, WA
All and all, it's only about the beer.
 

Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 1671
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 167.4.1.38
Posted on Thursday, August 11, 2005 - 10:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

heh heh, he said corrosion of his johnson...

My controller probe is probably 10 years old, and it's just discolored a bit. I don't know about coating it in rubber? Maybe some keg lube if yer concerned.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 1391
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.31.197
Posted on Thursday, August 11, 2005 - 11:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think that the galvantic reaction in a CO2 rich atmosphere is probably the problem. The cure is simple enough, keep it away from metal.

Dan
Listermann Mfg.,Co. www.listermann.com

 

Jeff Preston
Junior Member
Username: Jeffpreston

Post Number: 96
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 142.161.185.165
Posted on Thursday, August 11, 2005 - 11:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've had mine ( Brewtek Digital) for 10 years without any problems. The probe has a coating on it probably similar to the tool handle stuff.
 

don price
Advanced Member
Username: Donzoid

Post Number: 715
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 24.94.127.208
Posted on Friday, August 12, 2005 - 12:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Damp Rid solves all problems. Not really, but it sounds good. No free water = no carbonic acid.

Don
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 1394
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.31.197
Posted on Friday, August 12, 2005 - 12:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Between Damp Rid and keeping the probe from contact with metal, I doubt that there would ever be a problem.

Dan
Listermann Mfg.,Co. www.listermann.com

 

Tom Meier
Intermediate Member
Username: Brewdawg96

Post Number: 300
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 70.149.149.43
Posted on Friday, August 12, 2005 - 05:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Carbonic acid from dissolved CO2 is a very weak acid. With water and 100% CO2 at atmospheric pressure its only a pH of 5 or 6. It was probably just old fashioned water and rust
 

Kris Featheringham
Member
Username: Kfeather

Post Number: 204
Registered: 06-2003
Posted From: 67.22.170.81
Posted on Friday, August 12, 2005 - 12:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well I just installed mine last night and turned on the fridge. I don't see corrosion yet :-) It might be awhile before you have my input on this.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 1813
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.49.148.10
Posted on Friday, August 12, 2005 - 02:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Get the digital version that uses a wired temp probe.