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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2005 * Archive through September 07, 2005 * Marris Otter Q's < Previous Next >

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Randy McCord
Intermediate Member
Username: Mccord

Post Number: 391
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 216.174.177.152
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 10:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How does it compare to american 2-row malt? All the lhbs have is Munten's marris otter. I know you all say it's not as good, but I'm stuck with it now. I've heard it's maltier. Maltier on the sweet side(body) or malty on the grainy side? I don't really know how to explain the flavor I'm thinking of. Anyway I'm trying to formulate a recipe and I don't want to add too much crystal malts for fear of too sweet beer. I know the mash temp will have some effect, but just wondering in general what everyone's experiences are with this malt. I hope someone can make some sense of this question. It seems like I remember someone here last year brewing an All maris otter beer.
 

Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 1739
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 167.4.1.38
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 11:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Randy, you've got it backwards, the MO is superior to the normal us 2-row. It's difficult to explain taste in writing, but it's a more full-bodied malty flavor. I just did a 100% MO beer (yesterday), no crystal, but that's a taste preference.

Use it the same as us 2-row, but expect ~10% higher efficiency. Brew on!
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 3362
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.229.8
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 12:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I wouldn't say Maris Otter fits all styles, but it certainly would be my preferred base malt for many English ales. It is more flavorful than domestic two-row malt.

I may have been the one who posted the all-Maris Otter recipe. As I mentioned in another thread, a friend brewed it this summer and said it was a big hit at a party.

Summer Blonde (BA)
A ProMash Recipe Report

BJCP Style and Style Guidelines
-------------------------------
06-B Light Hybrid Beer, Blonde Ale
Min OG: 1.038 Max OG: 1.054
Min IBU: 15 Max IBU: 28
Min Clr: 2 Max Clr: 5 Color in SRM, Lovibond

Recipe Specifics
----------------
Batch Size (Gal): 5.25 Wort Size (Gal): 5.25
Total Grain (Lbs): 7.50
Anticipated OG: 1.0418 Plato: 10.42
Anticipated SRM: 4.0
Anticipated IBU: 20.9
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75 %
Wort Boil Time: 65 Minutes

Formulas Used
-------------
Color Formula Used: Morey
Hop IBU Formula Used: Tinseth
Tinseth Concentration Factor: 1.19
Additional Utilization Used For Pellet Hops: 5 %

Grain/Extract/Sugar
% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
100.0 7.50 lbs. Pale Ale Malt (2 Row) Great Britain 1.0390 3
Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.

Hops
Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.25 oz. Crystal Pellet 3.25 16.0 60 min.
0.50 oz. Crystal Pellet 3.25 4.5 25 min.
0.25 oz. Crystal Pellet 3.25 0.4 3 min.

Extras
Amount Name Type Time
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.00 Tsp Irish Moss Fining 15 Min.(boil)

Yeast
-----
Wyeast 1318 London Ale III

Mash Schedule
-------------
Mash Type: Single Step
Grain Lbs: 7.50
Water Qts: 9.38 - Before Additional Infusions
Water Gal: 2.34 - Before Additional Infusions
Qts Water Per Lbs Grain: 1.25 - Before Additional Infusions
Saccharification Rest Temp : 152 Time: 60
Mash-out Rest Temp : 168 Time: 10
Sparge Temp : 170 Time: 45
Total Mash Volume Gal: 2.94 - Dough-In Infusion Only
All temperature measurements are degrees Fahrenheit.

Notes
-----
Adjust mash pH with calcium chloride if water is somewhat alkaline.
 

Chris Vejnovich
Member
Username: Cjv85vmax

Post Number: 229
Registered: 06-2003
Posted From: 4.227.200.154
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 12:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Randy, I feel as if my beers have a little more body when I use MO. I use Crisp floor malted by the way. Some of the professional brewers I have talked with really like the Crisp malt as well, but feel that it is really expensive. On a homebrew scale who cares right. The big flavor difference between Muntons MO/AM 2-Row/Crisp MO is when you actually taste the malts side by side. I have tasted all 3 side by side and I prefered the Crisp MO to the other two malts. Muntons is ok, but I think that it is not quite as hand crafted as the Crisp malts. Interestinly enough, I lived not far from the malting facility that does Muntons. Newmarket is known for its horse racing. I wonder if the Muntons Co. sells any grains to the horse racing stud farms and if this reflects the quality of their product compared to Crisp.
 

Randy McCord
Intermediate Member
Username: Mccord

Post Number: 393
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 216.174.177.180
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 01:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks everyone. I may do an all MO recipe just to find out what it's like. I never stick to a specific style when brewing, and I've never tried Spalt hops either, so maybe it will be an all MO and Spalt recipe. Kill two birds, one stone. Also, to make my post clearer, I meant that I heard Munton's MO was not as good as Crisp, Fawcett, or whatever the other maltster was.
 

Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 1740
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 207.200.116.12
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 02:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hugh baird. dah, upon rerereading I understand now.

not sure I've ever done a 2 ingredient allgrain batch, interesting (1malt+1hop).
 

Randy McCord
Intermediate Member
Username: Mccord

Post Number: 394
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 216.174.177.169
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 03:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I saw a brown ale recipe a while back in byo mag. that calls for maris otter. I might brew it instead, a good brown ale don't sound too bad right now.
 

J. Steinhauer
Advanced Member
Username: Jstein6870

Post Number: 745
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 216.70.45.1
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 06:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The main difference between Munton's and Crisp and some others is that Munton's is not floor malted. I often hear of the superiority of floor malting, but I've never compared directly.

While I would not be able to argue about the difference, which one is "better" is almost certainly up to the beholder. I used Munton's when my LHBS stocked it. Now I use Crisp or Gleneagle (or whatever it is).

MO malt with about 10% honey malt from Canada makes a fantastic English bitter, IMO.
 

gregory gettman
Intermediate Member
Username: Gregman

Post Number: 444
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 69.37.234.114
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 02:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There is a difference.

I've used the crisp before and it is my favorite 2row malt for, bitters, scotch, scotish, pale, IPA, brown, stout, Irish reds, porter, you name it.

I have a bag of Thomas Fawcett MO now and although its good (I brewed a few beers with it) and better than briess 2 row, its still not as good as crisp.

I can only relate that it tastes less malty and has less body? Thats my impression anyway, spend more money and buy the crisp I say.........
 

davidw
Senior Member
Username: Davidw

Post Number: 1287
Registered: 03-2001
Posted From: 65.163.6.62
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 02:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was always under the impression that floor malting didn't neccesarily mean a superior product but was more consistant from 'batch' to 'batch'.

Beestons was the other floor malting that I recall had excellent MO.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 3597
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 71.37.187.47
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 03:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Steinhauer. A 90% MO/10% honey malt bitter has just been added to my September brewing schedule!
 

Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 1744
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 207.200.116.12
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 03:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I must be overly sensitive to that gambrinus honey malt, 'cause 10% in any beer (for me) would become lawn fertilizer (after being used for cooking brats & potroast). That stuff is just insipid to me. You 'may' want to try less than 10%...
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 3599
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 71.37.187.47
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 03:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

HH, I would agree that 10% honey malt in a regular beer would be too much, but I am thinking that in a 1.037 bitter, it might be just the ticket. I am a self-admitted world's suckiest low gravity brewer, the reason being that most of my low gravity beers are watery. I'm thinking that 6 lbs. of M.O. and a half pound of honey malt, balanced with about 30-35 IBUs of Challenger/EKG, femrented with the WLP Essex yeast (I have a vial bought back in January that is unused), might make for a tasty fall session beer.
 

Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 1745
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 207.200.116.12
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 03:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Actually, I find it even more noticeable in a 'lighter' brew, go figure. Yer under 8%, go fer it.
 

Dave Bossie
Member
Username: Boss_brew

Post Number: 112
Registered: 05-2005
Posted From: 205.179.133.98
Posted on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 - 04:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Chumley...I just wandered into the low G Bitter with my last batch. I used some honey malt and S04 dry yeast (at 60 degrees). It's a little too sweet for my taste, so I'm going to add some of Hoptech's Alpha extract to 1 of the kegs. I'll let you know how it works. BTHW, Dan at Hoptech is great to work with, and ships out fast. NA, just a happy customer.
Dave