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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through June 28, 2006 * Crash cooling < Previous Next >

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John Bueltel
New Member
Username: Hb92

Post Number: 4
Registered: 06-2006
Posted From: 12.215.64.43
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 02:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Now that I am setting up my refrigerator with a temp control I have new brewing possibilities. Does anyone crash cool their ales? What are the pros and cons?
 

Bruce Williamson
Junior Member
Username: Bwilliamson

Post Number: 48
Registered: 03-2005
Posted From: 71.197.188.23
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 03:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I crash cool all of my ales the main benefit being clarity, settles out hops if dry hopping as well as yeast.
 

Beerboy AKA The Jolly Brewer
Senior Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 1158
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 86.128.168.78
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 09:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Many commercial English breweries do this prior to racking to casks along with primings.

Only cons are if the yeast has not finnished doing it's stuff and there may be some unfermented sugars, but if you keep the beer at the reduced temperature this shouldn'e really be a problem.
 

Tim Wi
Intermediate Member
Username: Riverkeeper

Post Number: 446
Registered: 03-2005
Posted From: 170.141.68.2
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 12:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I crash chill everything, after 2ndary, for clarity, including ales.

EDIT: I cant' think of any cons. Same as it sitting refrigerated in a keg.

T

(Message edited by riverkeeper on June 14, 2006)
 

Richard Nye
Senior Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 1448
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 68.4.202.69
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 12:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I crash cool most ales also. But I wouldn't crash cool a hefeweizen or Belgian wit because I don't want the yeast to drop out.
 

Ken Anderson
Senior Member
Username: Ken75

Post Number: 1568
Registered: 11-2002
Posted From: 69.168.141.10
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 01:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I run fermentation to completion in one vessel, then crash cool for a few days before transfer to cornie or conditioning vessel. I want to leave as much as possible behind. Don't need yeast at this point, right?
 

Brewrunner
New Member
Username: Brewrunner

Post Number: 12
Registered: 05-2006
Posted From: 71.252.208.25
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 02:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I understand one of the reasons for crash cooling is to drop the yeast, however for those of us who bottle, isn't this counterproductive to getting good carbonation? Or would a month of cold lagering still leave enough yeast to carbonate? A guess a pack of dry yeast wouldn't hurt at bottling time. Just wondering how to do it for those of you who crash cool then bottle.
 

Paul Erbe
Advanced Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 587
Registered: 05-2001
Posted From: 12.27.22.67
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 02:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There will be plenty of yeast left to handle carbonation. Only a very small addition of sugar is made so only a small population of yeast is needed.

The exception to this would be a very big(over 1.080) beer that has aged for a while.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 5600
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.243
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 02:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you were to look at seemingly crystal clear unfiltered beer under a microscope you would be surprised at the yeast population.
 

Ken Anderson
Senior Member
Username: Ken75

Post Number: 1569
Registered: 11-2002
Posted From: 69.168.141.10
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 03:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We should see if /Fredrik would take a picture. He's the microscope guy.
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 1939
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 03:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have lagered small and big beers for many months both ale and lager yeast and have had not problem carbing in the bottle. The biggest ale was 1.105 lagered for 3 months before bottling. I had an O-fest lagering for 6 plus months that also had no issue carbing in the bottle.

-Doug
 

Fredrik
Senior Member
Username: Fredrik

Post Number: 3225
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 213.114.44.200
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 04:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Last year I made a simple test to answer this question:

How much yeast in million/ml, can you have in suspension before you can see the haze with your naked eye?

For simplicity, I only did two dilutions.

7 million/ml
0.2 million/ml
0 million/ml

This is the result


It's hard to see on the picture, but the 0.2 million/ml is difficult to distuinguish from the 0 million/ml sample. If you look carefully against the light, side by side, you can see it but it's not something you would see at a quick glance without comparing side by side.

The conclusion is that at several million/ml it's expected to be a visible haze, 7 million/ml is VERY hazy, but below the million mark it depends if you can see it. Below 0.1 million/ml you probably will not see it with your naked eye, and this is a substantial amount of yeast still.

The less yeast you have the longer should it take to carbonate. But I don't prime anymore so I don't have much practical input.

Just for the numbers, the pitching rate of 1 million/ml/P translated into the priming domain would suggest a "priming rate" of maybe 0.6 million/ml, which I would guess is on the edge where you can detect the yeast haze in a coloured beer by visual inspection. It could probably be seen a slight haze, if you look close against light.

To remove doubts, adding some yeast at bottling seems like a simple thing to do.

/Fredrik

(Message edited by fredrik on June 14, 2006)