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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2006 * Archive through November 14, 2006 * Hot water heater wiring < Previous Next >

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Ron Siddall
Member
Username: El_cid

Post Number: 182
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 198.135.241.18
Posted on Tuesday, November 07, 2006 - 11:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Got an electric hot water heater, 240V.

Came with a red wire, a black wire and a green one.

Mmmmmm, no white.

Me thinks the red wire goes to one side of the sub panel to pull in 120v while the black goes to the other side to pull in the other 120v for a total of 240v. Both of these fed into the sub panel via an appropriate sized 240v breaker.

The green goes to ground.

Why is there no white like a normal circuit?
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Little Dipper
Member
Username: Littledipper

Post Number: 129
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 69.214.10.49
Posted on Tuesday, November 07, 2006 - 11:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There are two types of 240 cords. All have two hots (red and black). The green is ground if it has it, and white's a common return (basically another ground). It's my understanding that the 3 cord ones are the old-school style until things started being grounded and the addition of the green or bare wire. It'll probably depend on the style plug you have as to which you'll get. If you have a choice, I'd recommend 4 wire if your house has somewhat up-to-date wiring.

All that being said, be very careful working with 240V and if you have any questions about what you're doing, don't do it. Get someone who knows their stuff. 240V would have no problem giving you the last shock of your life in no time flat.
 

Tony Legge
Member
Username: Boo_boo

Post Number: 208
Registered: 05-2005
Posted From: 142.163.83.110
Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 10:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

All that being said, be very careful working with 240V and if you have any questions about what you're doing, don't do it. Get someone who knows their stuff. 240V would have no problem giving you the last shock of your life in no time flat.

I would take this advise. By your post above, you don't know how to wire it, and 240v can give
a good root.
 

Ron Siddall
Member
Username: El_cid

Post Number: 185
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 198.135.241.18
Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 04:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have gotten advice and it is being inspected by the building department before turn on.

I was just wondering why they now treat this as a two wire with no white.
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Paul Muth
Intermediate Member
Username: Pjmuth

Post Number: 269
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 65.1.161.33
Posted on Thursday, November 09, 2006 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ron,

That is a common wiring method for 220/240 V applications where a 110/120 V reference is not required. Your water heater operates on 240 V and does not require a 120 V connection as there is nothing within the unit that requires 120. This allows the use of a connecting cable that is 2 wire with ground (Ok - it's really 3 wires) thus saving on wiring costs. With that cable in use for 240 V, the white must be flagged as red on both ends of the cable. (that's code)

Now - on the other hand, your clothes drier and electric stove require both 120 and 240 V as the heating elements are driven by 240 and the timer/clock/control circuits are 120 V. Therefore, a 3 wire cable must be used (black, red, white and ground - really 4 wires).

I hope this makes sense.
 

Ron Siddall
Member
Username: El_cid

Post Number: 191
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 198.135.241.18
Posted on Thursday, November 09, 2006 - 04:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul, thanks for the info. Here is what I did though.

From the water heater plug to the breaker in the panel, I used 3 wire with ground. The colors were black, red, white and green. I used only the black, red and green and capped off the white. The black and red will be hot while the green is ground.

Does that work for code?
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Paul Muth
Intermediate Member
Username: Pjmuth

Post Number: 270
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 65.1.161.33
Posted on Friday, November 10, 2006 - 01:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ron,

That is A-Ok..

Glad I could help..
 

Brewaholic
New Member
Username: Brewaholic

Post Number: 1
Registered: 01-2003
Posted From: 151.204.71.44
Posted on Friday, November 10, 2006 - 02:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

three phase leg markings A B C phases

The colors A = black, B = red, C = blue denotes current carrying conductors of voltage 250 volts ac 120v taps. although the center tap can be higher 180 v on center tap transformers. The neutral wire is always white.

The colors A = brown B = orange C= yellow denotes high voltage 460/480 volts and A & C = 240v, Orange = 277v taps. The neutral wire color is always grey.

This tells the field techs what voltage they are working with by just looking at the wires

Since single phase only has two taps + neutral, you go by A and B phase, which is Black and Red.

The electrical appliance manufactures have to use these wiring colors. So when you see a black and red wire sticking out of the appliance you know it is a 240 volt application.

If it was 120v it would be black & white leads

Since a water heater is 100% resistive circuit it only need the two current carrying conductor + an equipment bonding ground (Green)or bare copper

In residentual wiring you can use 2 conductor romex w ground to hook these appliances up. You have to mark the termination ends of the white conductor in the romex to denote a current carrying wire.

hope this helps

(Message edited by Brewaholic on November 10, 2006)
 

Ron Siddall
Member
Username: El_cid

Post Number: 197
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 198.135.241.18
Posted on Friday, November 10, 2006 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul/Brewaholic,

Thanks for the info.

Brewaholic, thanks for making this answer your very first post.
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