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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2007 * Archive through January 09, 2007 * Bottling day buzz - am I alone? < Previous Next >

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Graham Cox
Advanced Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 825
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 06:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I bottled a N. English Brown and a Tripel today, and I will soon be bottling an Italian Montepulciano (that's a fermented grape beverage commonly known as "wine" for you hard-core beer guys). I have taken to pulling a rather substantial "sample" from my bottling efforts - you know, for critical evaluation and for "quality control" purposes. Sometimes I also have an odd quantity left over that is not suitable for bottling, and I also enter it into the sample for "analysis."

I have no problem drinking semi-flat, room-temperature beer right out of the secondary (or primary) fermenter - in fact, I rather enjoy it. This Tripel is lighting me up like a Christmas tree! Am I alone in the premature enjoyment of the fruits of my labors?
 

dhacker
Advanced Member
Username: Dhacker

Post Number: 730
Registered: 11-2002
Posted From: 74.226.104.252
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 06:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Probably, though it's beer thirty on the other side of the pond.

Here in the states, a few of us have to work for a living!

(I have to admit I TESTED a sample of my Wit from the secondary before I left for work this AM)
 

Rob Farrell
Intermediate Member
Username: Robf

Post Number: 361
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 75.198.42.44
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 06:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

On bottling day, it's usually the dog that gets the buzz from all the spilled beer. I usually have enough trouble keeping it off the floor without imbibing.

At the end, though, there's always that underfilled bottle...excellent!

(Message edited by robf on January 04, 2007)
 

Paul Hayslett
Senior Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 1192
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 71.234.46.245
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 06:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I sample when racking to secondary.

I sample when checking to see if it is ready to bottle.

I sample when bottling.

I sample when checking to see if it is carbonated yet.

Sometimes I'm surprised that there is still any left when it is ready to drink.
"God bless us all, every one."
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4532
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 06:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I hate bottling so much, that when I do (maybe 5-10% of my beer anymore, the rest is kegged), I have to drink beer. :-) Since the beer is flat and at 60°F or so, I like to add about 1/4 of a can of ice cold Coors or PBR to the pint glass, then fill up out of the bottling spigot. I usually only drink one, though.
 

Richard Nye
Senior Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 1943
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 68.4.202.69
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 07:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Unfortunately my brewery and bottling line are right next to the hospitality bar, so I regularly sample prior batches while I'm doing brewing chores.
 

Graham Cox
Advanced Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 827
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 07:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

(I gave you one star just to hurt your feelings, Richard )
 

Mark Zgarrick
Member
Username: Maz

Post Number: 194
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 206.252.74.40
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 08:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Since I pretty much only bottle high gravity stuff these days(I know, I'm a wuss for not kegging my BW and RIS batches ), I definitely catch a buzz on bottling day!
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 3902
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.23.59.245
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 09:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have always encouraged folks to always taste their beer when bottling. It is always a good thing to have a benchmark in case there are problems. It is good to know if the problem is pre or post bottling.

After a while, you develop a taste for warm flat beer.

Dan

--This space is STILL being left intentionally blank.-


 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 2590
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.49.148.10
Posted on Thursday, January 04, 2007 - 10:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul reminds me of a former neighbor and brewing buddy. By the time to keg a lager there'd be maybe half a carboy left. He'd rack samples into a soda bottle and carbonate with a carbonator cap for research purposes

I keep a few 4 oz sample glasses handy to taste at rackings and keggings. I rarely ever bottle entire batches anymore. I'll fill a few bottles and prime with carbtabs for competitions when I'm kegging sometimes. Going to have 5 gal of RIS soon and think I'm going to keg but keep at room temp and not carbonate it. I'll just fill 2L soda bottles from the keg and chill and then carbonate with a carbonator cap when I want some to drink.
 

dhacker
Advanced Member
Username: Dhacker

Post Number: 731
Registered: 11-2002
Posted From: 74.226.122.102
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 01:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Obviously, I completely missed on the context of Graham's post. I thought he was talking about getting buzzed so early in the day.

Anyway . . I enjoy sampling the raw ingredients before they ever make it into the mash tun/ boil kettle. Nothin’ quite like poppin' a few Columbus pellets into the ol' pie hole.

I enjoy the hydrometer sample after the boil is finished. I enjoy a sample when fermentation begins to subside. I enjoy a sample when I finally rack to secondary and again when kegging. and especially when fully carbed. I think important lessons are learned about the metamorphosis when one samples the product from start to finish.

And I will not waste one precious drop!
 

Steve Jones
Intermediate Member
Username: Stevej

Post Number: 265
Registered: 08-2001
Posted From: 24.159.40.129
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 02:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Warm flat beer, Dan? You must be talking about a bitter or a mild. Those are some great beers - nothing like a good pull on the beer engine at cellar temps.

Ditto, dhacker. I too taste it on the way to the primary, the secondary, the keg, the bottle, and all the hydrometer samples in between. I even taste my starters. I think all of it is 'educational'.

I made an ABC on Oct 22 that has at least a half gallon missing now. Wonderful stuff!
 

John Ferens
Member
Username: John_ferens

Post Number: 172
Registered: 05-2003
Posted From: 71.60.245.60
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 03:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

From Graham: "Am I alone in the premature enjoyment of the fruits of my labors?"

My reply would simply be: "Who doesn't!"

Cheers (even if it is warm and flat)!
John.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 6172
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 03:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I could tell a story about a 5-gallon carboy I have in my cellar with a six-year-old framboise pLambic in tertiary (actually quaternary, to be entirely correct). After seeing "Wild Brews" on my book shelf and browsing it once again on a whim, last night I decided to summon the courage pry off the airlock (I've managed to keep it from going dry during the course of five moves) and sample it.

I had several surprises. The Brett. character is there but hardly overwhelming, and so are the raspberries. It's quite dry and low in body. I didn't take a gravity reading, but I'd say about 1.004. And it doesn't taste all that old; in fact, it compares favorably with the last bottle of Boon Framboise I had the good fortune to try. Mine is less sweet if not quite as fruity.

Of course now I have to decide what to do with it. The easy solution would be to rack to a corny keg and force carbonate to a generous level, but that seems out of character for the style. I suppose I have to bottle, pitching a packet of Nottingham with the priming sugar and hoping the pH is not too low to impede carbonation.

Six years is a long time to wait for a beer.
 

Richard Nye
Senior Member
Username: Yeasty_boy

Post Number: 1945
Registered: 01-2004
Posted From: 68.4.202.69
Posted on Friday, January 05, 2007 - 03:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Graham, I'm hurt. You're brutal.