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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2007 * Archive through February 12, 2007 * Plunge to grain < Previous Next >

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Brewer ZUUL
New Member
Username: Brewer_zuul

Post Number: 3
Registered: 01-2007
Posted From: 67.159.26.26
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 02:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i have several brewering friends that are trying to get me to go grain brewing and i am interested in what path it is that i should take. Should i go with a round cooler as a mash vessel a rectangled cooler or stainless or aluminum

i also am wondering about mash screens
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 6379
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 02:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you're interested in all-grain brewing, I highly recommend John Palmer's How to Brew. The first edition is online, but the latest third edition is in print and available at many bookstores. It answers all of your questions above and many more. The situation is that there are nearly as many ways to brew as there are brewers. You will find what fits your inclinations and situation.

(Message edited by BillPierce on January 26, 2007)
 

Rob Farrell
Intermediate Member
Username: Robf

Post Number: 387
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 66.174.79.232
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 02:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I mash in a 10-gallon round Igloo drink cooler with a loop of stainless hose braid for 5-gallon batches. I used a 5-gallon cooler at first and that was fine for single-infusion fly-sparged medium gravity beers. The 10-gallon gives me more flexibility of recipe, mash schedule and sparge technique. Too big a cooler exaggerates the heat loss when brewing in the cold. Excellent beer is brewed with all types of mash setups.
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 2637
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 208.49.148.10
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 03:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Check out the Denny-brew setup as well. It's a good way to start for not a lot of $ and works quite well. I don't have the link to the site. Maybe Denny will see the thread or someone has it bookmarked.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 6382
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 03:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I suspect this is what Vance was referring to: http://hbd.org/cascade/dennybrew/
 

Dick the Brewzzer
New Member
Username: Brewzzer

Post Number: 1
Registered: 01-2007
Posted From: 75.126.95.53
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 04:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i must admit, i'm a little intimidated to post, but this subject seems innocent enough for me to get my feet wet.
for 5 gallon batches, i use a 10 gallon round rubbermaid cooler with the fitted dome shaped stainless screen. this screen just seems like it evenly captures the sugars from above, whereas a strand of stainless might not do this. i don't know, i'm just surmising. it works well, though.
i put 2 thick bath towels on the lid during mashing to hold in the heat. it easily holds temps for 90 min.
 

Mike A.
Member
Username: Mike_a

Post Number: 243
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 128.173.15.155
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 04:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think what equipment you go with will largely depend on your budget. Coolers and SS mesh screens are cheap whereas large stainless kettles and false bottoms are expensive. In the end though, there is little difference in the beer quality.
 

Mike
Intermediate Member
Username: Macker

Post Number: 308
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 151.151.21.102
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 04:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have used coolers with bazookas, polarware pots w/false bottoms, and converted kegs with bazooka screens for mash vessels. I really like the efficiency I get with the polarware with a false bottom set up.

There are many choices out there. I like the pots and converted kegs because you can direct heat them.
 

Hophead
Senior Member
Username: Hophead

Post Number: 2392
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 167.4.1.41
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 04:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'd start with the rubbermaid cooler option, then if (WHEN) you decide you're hooked, you can upgrade to sanke kegs, and still use the cooler for brewouts! Welcome brewzzer...
 

Geoff Buschur
Senior Member
Username: Avmech

Post Number: 1398
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 208.8.57.2
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 04:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I second the recommendation to use the Denny Technique. This is a great way to start out and learn the process with very little equipment. From there you can build a rig or just keep on doing it the simple way.

I started out by building a rig and making adjustments to it almost every batch. Then I started all over with a new rig and made adjustments to that. Now I am on my third version and have plans for building my fourth version.....
"I've been drunk for 14 years...my judgment isn't what it used to be."
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 6143
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 74.92.175.78
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 05:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dick the Brewzzer, let me put your speculation at ease...I've used the rectangular cooler with a single braid for well over 250 batches of beer. I've won awards with beers made with that system. I consistently get over 80% efficiency. In short, it works GREAT!
LIfe begins at 60...1.060, that is.
 

Tom Fries
Junior Member
Username: Tfries

Post Number: 33
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 64.42.35.66
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 11:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dick,

I have both a 10 gallon round rubbermaid like yours and a single braid cooler. They both work equally as well.
 

ELK
Senior Member
Username: Elkski

Post Number: 1799
Registered: 01-2003
Posted From: 71.195.244.40
Posted on Sunday, January 28, 2007 - 06:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you go with a 10 gal=40 qt you will be sad if you ever plan on a 10 gal batch. That is true for 48 qt and 56 qt. I will make a 72qt for my next one. cost about 25$ + cooler. You can always convert the cooler back to a cooler if you keep the parts. Maybe a little brown inside???
A beer a day keeps the Mormons away!!