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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2007 * Archive through April 17, 2007 * Book: Beer in America - The early years < Previous Next >

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Spartacus
Junior Member
Username: Spartacus_manly

Post Number: 68
Registered: 11-2006
Posted From: 24.128.118.170
Posted on Monday, April 02, 2007 - 05:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello,

I just picked up a copy of this on Amazon:

Beer in America - The early years

Has anyone read it?

Did you like it?

Any other books like it out there that also need to be read?

Thanks
Sorry Roger, You Tiger now!
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 1020
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Monday, April 02, 2007 - 05:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Spartacus, I recently read a similar book that I picked up at my local library entitled, I believe, "Brewed in America." It was written around 1963, so it covered everything up to that time. It was very insightful and enjoyable.
 

Gary Muehe
Member
Username: Garymuehe

Post Number: 204
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 75.57.142.5
Posted on Monday, April 02, 2007 - 07:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

American Breweries II by Dale P. Van Wieren and Beer: A History of Suds and Civilization From Mesopotamia to Microbreweries By Gregg Smith are worth looking for. Am. Breweries II is really just a reference guide. It lists many breweries state by state and when they were in existence.
 

Spartacus
Junior Member
Username: Spartacus_manly

Post Number: 71
Registered: 11-2006
Posted From: 24.128.118.170
Posted on Monday, April 02, 2007 - 07:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks everyone!
Sorry Roger, You Tiger now!
 

Paul Erbe
Advanced Member
Username: Perbe

Post Number: 818
Registered: 05-2001
Posted From: 67.153.37.2
Posted on Monday, April 02, 2007 - 07:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just got a copy of Beer - A History of Brewing in Chicago by Bob Skilnik

I have not read it yet but it looks interesting.

http://www.amazon.com/Beer-History-Brewing-Bob-Skilnik/dp/1569803129

(Message edited by perbe on April 02, 2007)
 

Gary Muehe
Member
Username: Garymuehe

Post Number: 205
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 75.57.142.5
Posted on Monday, April 02, 2007 - 08:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul, Bob's book is great. He also offers a guided bus tour of former Chicago breweries. Some of it requires a certain level of beer geekyness as you are basically standing in front of a half torn down building were some brewery used to be. On the other hand, seeing the homes that head brewers were given to live in, with the brewers star design bricked into the side of the house, and places like Southport Lanes that used to be a Schlitz tied house, is pretty cool.
Again, beer geekyness required.
 

Mike Vachow
Member
Username: Mike

Post Number: 155
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 69.128.246.218
Posted on Sunday, April 08, 2007 - 01:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Smith's book is crucial reading for those who want to know how beer came to this country. For those who equate "past" for better, it'll take off your Romeos in a big way. The Founding Fathers drank some nasty dreck, and until the first wave of eastern European immigrants, this proto-nation was benighted when it comes to beer. Smith's book makes it clear that beer's much better now than ever.

When it comes to intoxication and murder, the slope of human technological progress has been an investor's dream. We've fulfilled our other needs in fits and starts, but in the case of these two, steady demand has created innovative supply, and Smith's book puts the booze end in context perfectly--a must for all beer geeks.

Mike
Lake Bluff, IL
 

KeepBrewing
Intermediate Member
Username: Kb7

Post Number: 251
Registered: 05-2002
Posted From: 24.184.80.79
Posted on Sunday, April 08, 2007 - 03:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Spart

I found the book to be a good read. I thought the colonial era to be very interesting.