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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2007 * Archive through June 06, 2007 * No Ferment < Previous Next >

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Phil Lapp
Junior Member
Username: Phil_lapp

Post Number: 50
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 216.107.199.70
Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 02:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I made a batch of SSOS, but of course made a few changes. I bumped the OG to 1.090 and had to use pelletized hops. I ended up with lots of hop crap in the primary. I also added some yeast slurry (Wyeast 1728) that was about six months old. Here I am about 48 hours later and nothing going on.

Thoughts:
1. Do you think too much hop pellet crap would affect my ferment?
2. I warmed up my yeast, and it appeared to be moving along, but maybe it really wasn't ready to roll.

If I can't see any activity by tonight, I will put in another slurry I have. phil.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 7168
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 02:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Six-month-old slurry can take quite a while to show activity, especially in a beer that big. You really should have made a starter. That said, I'm suspecting your beer will get going in another day or so. I can't speak to how well it will perform, however. The beer gods may smile on you, and then again not. It's best to pitch enough healthy yeast and not have to worry.
 

The Jolly Brewer
Senior Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 1606
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 86.128.162.236
Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 03:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill has said everything really, but maybe you'd be better off racking off any trub and pitching a couple of packets of dried yeast to get things going. Maybe the US 56 (or what ever its called now).
 

Phil Lapp
Junior Member
Username: Phil_lapp

Post Number: 51
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 216.107.199.70
Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 04:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Bill. I will wait another day and see what happens. I am hopeful, and I do have it sitting at about 70 degrees, so hopefully it will take off.
 

Phil Lapp
Junior Member
Username: Phil_lapp

Post Number: 52
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 216.107.199.70
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2007 - 02:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alright, so a week later I am at 1.020, just as planned. New question: I don't have a glass carboy available, but want to age this for about 6-8 months before serving. It is in a secondary bucket right now. I was thinking about just kegging after another couple weeks and letting it age in the keg.

Do you think there is any discernable difference aging in a keg versus a carboy? How about if I pull off a post and put on an airlock, versus just closing it up per usual?

In the past I have always let the big beers sit in glass, but I don't really want to go buy another carboy right now, but I have plenty of kegs around. phil
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 2138
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2007 - 03:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Drink SSOS young.....it looses something as it ages.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4824
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2007 - 03:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Doug is right...drink all IIPAs young...old IIPA = barley wine.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 7206
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.57.224.220
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2007 - 03:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'll be contrary and say I like SSoS best after about four weeks of aging. But the beauty is that you can try it both young and as it ages and decide for yourself.
 

Phil Lapp
Junior Member
Username: Phil_lapp

Post Number: 53
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 216.107.199.70
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2007 - 03:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

with the OG at 1.090, I am not inclined to drink it young. The hops are great, but the alcohol has a real bite to it. Generally yes, I would drink a SSOS at like 4-6 weeks, but this one is meant to border on barley wine.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 4826
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2007 - 03:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh, and as to your question....I age big beers in kegs all the time...can't tell any difference between the carboy. The advantage of keg aging is that you don't have to worry about the air lock drying out, and you can carb and taste it along the way easier.
 

The Jolly Brewer
Senior Member
Username: Matfink

Post Number: 1625
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 86.128.162.236
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2007 - 03:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"old IIPA = barley wine." I respectfully disagree. I made a traditional IPA that needed a good year to become drinkable. The sheer quantity of hops both for bittering and flavour/aroma meant that it was like drinking paint stripper for at least 6 months, but after a year was sublime, and after 2 and a half is still pretty bloody amazing.

SSOS at regular strength should be drunk within 6 months as it does change a lot after that, but I think phil is probably doing the right thing aging this.

Phil, If I were you I'd let it sit for a week in the secondary to let the yeast drop out then keg it with dry hops and leave it a couple of months before sampling it. I suspect it will be drinkable then, but the beauty of a keg is you can keep testing it until you feel it is ready to drink.
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 2139
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Tuesday, June 05, 2007 - 01:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

BTW, you can do a secondary in a plastic bucket for 6 to 8 months. I have done this many times with no issues. Most O2 in the head space should be displaced by the CO2 coming out of solution during the transfer, but you could also purge the head space with CO2 before transfering.

If you are worried about O2 passing through thick plastic think about how much O2 might make it through. It can not be any more than what you might get when you finally transfer to the keg. Plus you have living yeast in there just that will use the O2 after being in an O2 deficient environment for so long.

-Doug
 

Hallertauer
Intermediate Member
Username: Hallertauer

Post Number: 471
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 204.104.55.241
Posted on Tuesday, June 05, 2007 - 01:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

**but after a year was sublime, and after 2 and a half is still pretty bloody amazing**

What's the difference between 'sublime' and 'bloody amazing'? Is 'bloody amazing better?