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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2008 * Archive through August 26, 2008 * Berliner Weiss < Previous Next >

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Aaron MacDonald
Member
Username: Inveigler

Post Number: 132
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 24.192.6.104
Posted on Friday, July 25, 2008 - 03:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can I brew a Berliner Weiss that will be ready in 3 weeks if I use a sour mash technique?
 

Beertracker
Senior Member
Username: Beertracker

Post Number: 1208
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 72.16.21.191
Posted on Friday, July 25, 2008 - 04:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, but then it wouldn't be a true Berliner Weiße now would it?

PROST! Beertracker
 

Aaron MacDonald
Member
Username: Inveigler

Post Number: 133
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 24.192.6.104
Posted on Saturday, July 26, 2008 - 04:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Beertracker, I recognize that it won't be a true Berliner; but, I have heard that other folk have had success with this technique. I have a party coming up for which I would like to brew something unusual. There are a lot of low to mid-level beer geeks coming and with the relative unavailability of Berliner Weiss in the Detroit market, I think that this would be interesting to try. Furthermore, I'm hoping that most of the spouses may like it because I would serve with a variety of syrups

As I understand it, I mash as usual and then let the temp drop to around 120. At that point, I add some kernels of barley (2 tsp for 10 gallons?) to the the mash. Try to hold this temp for 24 hours. Sparge with hop-infused water. And then a quick boil to kill off the nasties.

I know that this may be a non traditional brewing technique for this style. But, I am not trying to impress any judges. I just need to know if it would work and make something resembling a Berliner in only 3 weeks.

Do you have experience with this, Beertracker? Anyone? Thanks!
 

Beertracker
Senior Member
Username: Beertracker

Post Number: 1210
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 72.16.21.191
Posted on Saturday, July 26, 2008 - 05:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The technique will definitely create a sour beer. I've used it to create a Kentucky Common & a pseudo-Berliner and experimented with partial mini-mashes on some pilsners & wheats. I'd recommend mixing in approx. 10% acidulated malt (milled) at the 118F mark then hold overnight. Good luck!

CHEERS! Beertracker
 

Pete O
Junior Member
Username: Peteo

Post Number: 34
Registered: 10-2007
Posted From: 75.22.17.114
Posted on Saturday, July 26, 2008 - 10:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Aaron, this thread might be of interest to you: http://hbd.org/discus/messages/1/45250.html?1212591673

The lazy technique I ended up using was just to put some uncrushed grain in a cooler full of about 100F water, and let it sit 4 days. Pulled off the water, brought to a boil, added wheat DME and small amount hops, let it go 15 minutes, and then chilled and pitched it with Wy 1056. Secondaried after krausen subsided and threw in a bottle of sour cherry juice at secondary. Bottled it a little less than 2 weeks later. From the start of letting it sour to bottling was about 3 weeks, so if you are kegging, that would fit your timeframe. It also would have gone probably a week or so faster if I hadn't secondaried for the sour cherry juice.

Definitely a pseudo-BW, but came out pretty good, especially considering the incredibly minimal effort. The level of tartness is similar to the Dogfish Head peche if you are familiar with that.

Good luck with whatever you decide to do!