Topics Topics Help/Instructions Help Edit Profile Profile Member List Register  
Search Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Visit The Brewery's sponsor!
Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2009 * Archive through April 10, 2009 * Safbrew T-58 for a quick saison/farmhouse ale < Previous Next >

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
  ClosedClosed: New threads not accepted on this page        

Author Message
 

Christopher Allen
Junior Member
Username: Treeboy

Post Number: 73
Registered: 01-2007
Posted From: 130.39.214.238
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 02:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am looking to turn around a relatively quick saison/farmhouse ale and was thinking of trying of giving the T-58 a shot as it is described as having a peppery/phenolic profile. Anyone have any experience with this yeast for such a beer? I noticed that the attenuation is only 71-75%, so I will mash at 146 or so, ferment at around 70, then hit it with US-05 to drop it any more if need be.
 

Jim Williams
Junior Member
Username: Jim_williams

Post Number: 95
Registered: 02-2006
Posted From: 72.221.65.41
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 02:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I tried it once, and, intentionally let the beer go from 65ish up to 79F at the highest. It fermented out, but, didn't get as dry as I hoped. Problem is it tastes like a banana smells. My friend calls it Jims Belgian Banana. It is mellowing over time, but, it's a beer only a monkey would love
 

Christopher Allen
Junior Member
Username: Treeboy

Post Number: 74
Registered: 01-2007
Posted From: 130.39.214.238
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 03:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was thinking of trying to keep the temp down a bit more than that. Wonder if the high temps made it so much like a banana?
 

ChriSto
Advanced Member
Username: Christo

Post Number: 523
Registered: 02-2006
Posted From: 216.176.226.154
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 03:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I haven't gotten banana smells from T-58, but also have typically fermented in the upper 60s. It provides a decent amount of phenol and pepper in a moderate strength beer, seems less so the bigger it gets and the longer it ages. It is in general a moderate attenuator as you mention - I had a Belgian Blonde go from 1.066 to 1.012 and my Belgian Pale Ale go from 1.054 to 1.010. Going a little low on the sacch rest would probably be sufficient to produce the drying effect you're after.
 

Christopher Allen
Junior Member
Username: Treeboy

Post Number: 75
Registered: 01-2007
Posted From: 130.39.214.238
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 03:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks. I was thinking of shooting for a 1.060 beer and, like you said, keep it in the upper 60's. I think might throw a small amount of coriander at the end as well.
 

Jerrod Scott
Junior Member
Username: Jrod

Post Number: 35
Registered: 02-2008
Posted From: 71.38.87.48
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 05:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I ferment t-58 with up to 15% sugar and get great attenuation and phenols. Usually I get in the range of 90% attenuation if I let the ferment rip. If you aren't aging the beer you are going to get some good phenolic flavors. After two or three months you will start loosing these regardless and end up with wierd, malty, almost belgian flavor. I start at 68-72 degrees at pitch and let it rise to over 80 at the end of ferment. It works with this yeast. Give it a shot on present use ale but not the long term aging beers. IMHO of course.
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2126
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 06:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I won a couple of medals with a Belgian Blond fermented with this yeast at "normal" temperatures - in fact, I won my only Best-of-Show runner-up with it.

It's a very nice yeast if you do everything else right.
 

Christopher Allen
Junior Member
Username: Treeboy

Post Number: 76
Registered: 01-2007
Posted From: 130.39.214.238
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 03:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How would you describe the phenols you get from this yeast? Spicy? Clovey?
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2127
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 03:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My recollection is that they are more peppery, like white pepper. Fairly soft in character and only moderate in intensity, which is what I prefer in a Belgian. I don't enjoy overly-phenolic beers.
 

Christopher Allen
Junior Member
Username: Treeboy

Post Number: 77
Registered: 01-2007
Posted From: 130.39.214.238
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 03:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks. I was hoping for peppery. I might toss in a little coriander and grain of paradise for good measure.
 

Jerrod Scott
Junior Member
Username: Jrod

Post Number: 36
Registered: 02-2008
Posted From: 71.38.87.48
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 03:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Graham...did you age the blonde? I'm wondering if my experience with subsiding flavor has something to do with higher temperature fermentation.
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2132
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 03:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jerrod, no, it died an early death. "Only the good die young."
 

PaulK
Advanced Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 783
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 68.63.203.31
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 04:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm guessing that fermentation temperature played a role in my experience with this yeast but mine was over the top peppery. I don't mind peppery phenols but this was bordering on obscene.
 

John Ferens
Intermediate Member
Username: John_ferens

Post Number: 273
Registered: 05-2003
Posted From: 71.182.233.86
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 01:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alright Graham, how about posting the particulars of that Belgian Blond recipe, and your fermentation temperature profile? I just did a Blond that sort of crossed over into the Tripel range that was good, but I doubt it would have won any medals.

Cheers!
john.
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2133
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.32.253.156
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 04:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Belgian Blond Ale

A ProMash Brewing Session - Recipe Details Report

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (Gal): 5.25 Wort Size (Gal): 5.25
Total Grain (Lbs): 14.13
Anticipated OG: 1.075 Plato: 18.30
Anticipated SRM: 5.0
Anticipated IBU: 25.7
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70 %
Wort Boil Time: 90 Minutes


Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Extract SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
92.0 13.00 lbs. Pilsen (2 Row) France 1.068 2
3.5 0.50 lbs. Candi Sugar (clear) Generic 1.004 1
2.7 0.38 lbs. Honey Malt Canada 1.002 18
1.8 0.25 lbs. Demerara Sugar Generic 1.002 1

Exract represented as SG.


Hops

Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.00 oz. Santiam Pellet 4.60 15.5 60 min.
1.00 oz. Strisselspalt Whole 2.10 4.9 30 min.
0.50 oz. Goldings - U.S. Pellet 4.20 3.5 15 min.
0.50 oz. Santiam Pellet 5.20 1.7 5 min.


Yeast
-----

DCL Yeast T-58 SafBrew Specialty Ale

* * * * *

John, unfortunately I didn't take very good notes on this one. My records only indicate that it was fermented at 68F for two weeks, then straight into the keg. My ADF was 76%, not as dry as, say, a Golden Strong, but then a Belgian Blond is not supposed to be.

edit: I say my ADF was only 76%, but I've gotten very lazy about measuring my FG unless something just doesn't look or act right. ("What's the point", I think, "I'm not going to monkey with it anyway. They're finished, and if it's good enough for them, it's good enough for me.") That figure could very well just be there as a default value. It's sounds reasonable, but I can't 100% guarantee that it's accurate.

(Message edited by t2driver on March 07, 2009)
 

Michael
Advanced Member
Username: Hoppop

Post Number: 955
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 24.74.164.235
Posted on Wednesday, March 11, 2009 - 11:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My 3 cents....I recently brewed a 10 gallon batch of Am Wheat beer...for kicks, I decided to split the two carboys between US-56 and the T-58. Starting gravities at 1.052. Both were fermented at 68f....after three weeks in primary (I travel)...the US-56 was at 1.010....the T-58 at 1.020. WTF? I was scratching my head....

Perhaps I fermented too low at this strain (????). Anyone else have this experience?

I did add another packet of US-56 to the 1.020 carboy and it got down to 1.016....it is a good beer....my wife loves and reminds her of a German Hefe...however....what's up with the high OG?
 

Jerrod Scott
Junior Member
Username: Jrod

Post Number: 37
Registered: 02-2008
Posted From: 71.37.168.213
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 01:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This yeast will drop the FG low if you ferment higher and/or add plenty of simple sugar (15%). I got a Trippel with an SG of 1.10 down to 1.008 with 17% of the fermentables from table sugar, a lower mash temp of 148ish and a ferment temp starting at 72 and free rising during the summer. It can attenuate, you just have to massage it