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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2009 * Archive through April 10, 2009 * Dividing hop plants < Previous Next >

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Kevin Kowalczyk
Intermediate Member
Username: Itsfunbrewingbeer

Post Number: 494
Registered: 10-2007
Posted From: 67.167.4.225
Posted on Saturday, March 14, 2009 - 04:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I want to help my hops expand along my front fence. I currently have two plants, so from what I have read, I just dig up the existing plants, cut off a piece of the rhisomes with shoots showing, and replant them further down the fence. However, I don't want to damage the existing plants. Can somebody give me more specific info? (I've done a search, and the info I have found is very general).

When do I do this--before or after shoots start to show? How much do I dig up? How much do I cut off? Do I include any root material with the rhisome?
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 10098
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Saturday, March 14, 2009 - 06:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kevin, there may not be a lot of information because the process is relatively simple. You can divide the hops as soon as the frost is completely out of the ground. Cut portions about the size of your thumb from the existing rhizomes. Plant them in the new location in soil about six inches deep with the rootlets pointing down. If you don't have a lot of hops and want to replant the rhizomes you have dug up in their original location, you can certainly do so.
 

Rick Hawley
Junior Member
Username: Rick

Post Number: 43
Registered: 07-2003
Posted From: 64.148.35.150
Posted on Sunday, March 15, 2009 - 01:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I had good luck cutting the extra shoots when they get a few inches long and then putting them in a glass of water on the window sill. They sprout roots really fast. Once they have some good roots just stick them in the ground and away they go.
 

Dave Witt
Senior Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 1275
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 68.57.245.38
Posted on Sunday, March 15, 2009 - 04:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kevin,

Try to do it before the shoots start to show, IOW, now. The next 3 days are supposed to be warm. What I do is to find the edge of the crown and dig down there, carefully, toward the center of the crown and then lift up the rhizomes from underneath. Once you see what you have, you can pull up and cut what you want off of them. This is more difficult when the soil is muddy. Do not try to cut the rhizomes with a shovel as this will tear them and damage them to the point they will not grow. You must use a sharp pruning shear to get a nice clean cut.

Tuesday is supposed to be near 70 deg so I might plant my two new rhizomes then.
 

Bierview
Advanced Member
Username: Bierview

Post Number: 587
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 67.81.178.93
Posted on Monday, March 16, 2009 - 08:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Seems the deer eat everything in sight at our Catskill house. Anyone know if they go for hops? I'd like to plant some but don't want to add to the salad bar.
 

Cory K.
Intermediate Member
Username: Galaxy51

Post Number: 256
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 70.58.160.214
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 08:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kevin, Personally I wouldn't dig up the established crown but would dig down around it and cut some rhyzomes with several good sprouts showing for replanting.
If you let the hop go without triming back suckers last year you might have several quite long suckers that are sufficiently rooted that will produce new plants.
Layering is another way to get them to reproduce. Choose a few extra vines to grow for propogation purposes and train them to grow horizontally to the location where the new vine is wanted. Bury the vine with about 2 or 3 inches of soil for a distance of around a foot or more leaving the end of the vine above ground and free to climb. Water well and these buried areas will root and form a new plant.
I have done that and started another plant about 8 feet from the first one. It was not far behind the mother plant and produced a crop of cones in its first year. That fall I cut its connection to the mother plant when cutting the plants down for the winter.
 

Kevin Kowalczyk
Intermediate Member
Username: Itsfunbrewingbeer

Post Number: 496
Registered: 10-2007
Posted From: 67.167.4.225
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 12:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the advice, guys. I dug around the crown of my biggest plant and found a nice long rhizome with lots shoots. I cut off 12 pieces and planted them, 2 to a hole, all along the front fence, spacing them about about 3 feet apart. We'll see if any take. Cory, I'll try your layering method if they don't.

(I don't think I'll have deer problems in Chicago).
 

Dave Witt
Senior Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 1277
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 12.2.161.11
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 02:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, Kevin, do not dig up the entire plant. (I see you already did not) That would undo the established root system and it would be like year one or maybe two all over again.
 

Dave Witt
Senior Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 1278
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 12.2.161.11
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 02:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

BTW, I am in Streamwood and I do have a deer problem. They started coming into my subdivision when we had that heavy snow cover back in January and have been returning frequently. They have caused damage to my trellises and shat all over the yard. I hope they will not eat the emerging sprouts. I plan to place some Irish Spring soap, which I have heard is good for repelling deer, into some knee-high nylons and hanging them around the yard to deter them.
 

Kevin Kowalczyk
Intermediate Member
Username: Itsfunbrewingbeer

Post Number: 498
Registered: 10-2007
Posted From: 12.165.82.136
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 03:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have heard a shotgun is good for repelling deer.
 

Rick Hawley
Junior Member
Username: Rick

Post Number: 44
Registered: 07-2003
Posted From: 64.148.30.192
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 10:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bows are pretty good deterrent also.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 10115
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.192.193
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 10:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm no friend of Bambi. Deer are pests in many locations; low density suburban and exurban housing patterns actually encourage and protect them. There are too many people for them to be hunted safely, and very few predators, yet plenty of cover (and landscaping and gardens) to provide food and shelter.

(Message edited by BillPierce on March 17, 2009)
 

Dave Witt
Senior Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 1279
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 68.57.245.38
Posted on Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 01:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeah, Bill, I thought "Wow, deer in my own back yard!". But as soon as I saw what they did, I thought that they do not belong here. I live in a relatively urban/suburban area, but only 2 blocks from a forest preserve. They seem to be getting more and more comfortable around humans. Sometimes on my way home from work, driving by the forest preserve, you can almost reach out and touch them they're so close to the road.

deer pic
 

Kevin Kowalczyk
Advanced Member
Username: Itsfunbrewingbeer

Post Number: 501
Registered: 10-2007
Posted From: 67.167.4.225
Posted on Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 03:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Streamwood is pretty suburban from what I recall--my brother lives in Palatine, out your way, but probably more developed than Streamwood. I would drop the "urban" out of your urban/suburban description. Urban is when you can touch your house and your neighbor's house at the same time.
 

Little Dipper
Intermediate Member
Username: Littledipper

Post Number: 473
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 67.36.60.40
Posted on Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 01:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kevin, it sounds like you already split your hops, but there's a new Basic Brewing Video where he splits his hops if you're interested.
 

Dave Witt
Senior Member
Username: Davew

Post Number: 1280
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 12.2.161.11
Posted on Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 02:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kevin,

Yeah, I guess. I meant that I'm in a regular suburban subdivision and I'm more or less in the middle of it. The deer have to walk a couple blocks to get to my house from the forest preserve.
 

Bierview
Advanced Member
Username: Bierview

Post Number: 588
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 67.81.178.93
Posted on Thursday, March 19, 2009 - 12:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So has anyone had deer actually eat their hop plants?