Topics Topics Help/Instructions Help Edit Profile Profile Member List Register  
Search Last 1 | 3 | 7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Visit The Brewery's sponsor!
Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2009 * Archive through May 19, 2009 * Potatos and sweet potatos < Previous Next >

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
  ClosedClosed: New threads not accepted on this page        

Author Message
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 6585
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.83.191.159
Posted on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 03:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Any experience? Moisture content? Gelatinazation temperatures? Milling?
 

TappedOut
Junior Member
Username: Tappedout

Post Number: 40
Registered: 03-2005
Posted From: 205.175.225.22
Posted on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 03:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I made a spiced sweet-potato ale one fall. Sort of a pumpkin ale, but w/ sweet potato instead. I had ~ 3.5 lb, which I baked til soft & carmelized. I then peeled, and put in the blender w/ a little hot water, and added that to the mash (5 gallon batch). The beer turned out really good, but I'm not sure I could really tell the sweet potato was there. If I do it again, I'll use a lot more sweet-potato.
-Tom
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 6586
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.83.191.159
Posted on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 06:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have grated 20g of sweet potato and will let it dry to get an idea of its moisture content. Maybe I will try a micro mash to see what I can see.
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 7201
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 06:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

IIRC, BYO had a recipe for a sweet potato beer a few years back that addressed the questions you're asking Dan. You might be able to find it in their online index.
 

PaulK
Advanced Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 808
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 68.63.203.31
Posted on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 06:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've baked sweet potatoes before using them so I guess that took care of gelatinization. They're a much better choice than pumpkin in a pumpkin-style beer.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 6587
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.83.191.159
Posted on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 07:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

March / April 2004. I don't seem to be able to find a copy. Most everything else though. Thanks for making me sort my mags!

Anybody got a copy handy?
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 7203
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 07:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've got one at home. I'll _try_ to remember to dig it out and scan it for you.

Speaking of starch gelatinaztion temps, here's a good chart...

http://hbd.org/clubs/cascade/public_html/brewing/gel.jpg
 

Vance Barnes
Senior Member
Username: Vancebarnes

Post Number: 3653
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 74.7.7.66
Posted on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 09:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Denny, that's a quite usefull chart. Saved it with my other references.

(Message edited by vancebarnes on April 29, 2009)
 

Bob Boufford
Intermediate Member
Username: Bobb

Post Number: 425
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 96.52.166.10
Posted on Thursday, April 30, 2009 - 12:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan,

I found my copy. It was a Techniques column written by Chris Colby. In a nut shell, make mash potatoes without the salt and butter. Cube the potatoes, boil for 15 minutes, mash/whip the potatoes, mix with some strike water to create a "soup", add while mashing in.

I don't have a scanner so hopefully Denny can get a copy to you.

A couple years back for one of the club's BURRP! competitions (Brewing Under Really Ridiculous Parameters), it was Squash or Root Vegetables. So we has some interesting beet, carrot, potato, sweet potato and rutabaga beers along with the usual pumpkin and squash beers.

Cheers,

Bob
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 6588
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.83.191.159
Posted on Thursday, April 30, 2009 - 01:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bob, was there any guidance as to moisture content or yield?
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 6589
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.83.191.159
Posted on Thursday, April 30, 2009 - 02:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just letting grated sweet potato dry overnight showed that the moisture content is at least 70%.
 

Yam
Member
Username: Yam

Post Number: 169
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 72.240.36.235
Posted on Thursday, April 30, 2009 - 04:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oddly enough, I have nothing to add here.
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 2563
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 98.192.7.62
Posted on Thursday, April 30, 2009 - 04:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

lol
 

Bob Boufford
Intermediate Member
Username: Bobb

Post Number: 426
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 96.52.166.10
Posted on Friday, May 01, 2009 - 12:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan, Chris says in article "For recipe calculations... potatoes have 22% dry weight w/ 75% of it is starch ... about 7.6 points per pound per gallon." and "5.0 lbs of potatoes with dry weight 1.1 lbs have equivalent potential extract as 1.0 lb of 2-row pale malt".

For sweet potato with more starch, less protein and 3-6% sugar, "5.0 lbs of sweet potatoes for 1.0 lb of pale malt in basic ESB recipe"

Hope this helps...

Cheers,

Bob
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 6593
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.83.191.159
Posted on Friday, May 01, 2009 - 04:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Bob, that helps a lot.

Does he address gelatinization?
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 2568
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 24.248.74.254
Posted on Friday, May 01, 2009 - 06:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan, I found this:

http://www.skotrat.com/go/default/beer-recipes/select-homebrew-recipes/#mashed

Mashed Potato Ale by Mearle Gates

Mash:
9 lb. Gambrinus 2-row malt
1/2 lb. British Munich Malt
8 lb. mashed potatos
2 lb. Vienna Malt
3 lb. Rice Hulls - absolutely necessary (end of mash)
1 tbsp. Irish Moss

Hop Schedule:
1.5 oz. Nugget Hops 1 hr. (Mine were home grown)
1 oz. E. Kent Goldings Hops 1/2 hr.
1 oz. Wild Hops 15 min. (substitute Northern Brewer)
2 oz. Ultra Hops 5 min.
.4 oz. Ultra Hops 1 min.
.5 oz. E. Kent Goldings 1 min.

Yeast:
Munton Fison Ale

O.G. 1.042
F.G. 1.015

First, boil 8 lb. of well washed peeled potatoes until done. Throw out the boil water to get rid of dirt remnants and green skin flavors. Mash to a fine consistency adding water as necessary. Allow temperature to settle at 140 F. Add 2 oz. amylase enzyme and let sit as long as you have patience and care to monitor the temperature.

This time affects to a great extent your conversion. It will become much thinner in consistency and sweeten. When you finally lose your patience (3 hrs for me) add the soup to the main mash and begin your protein rest for 1/2 hr. at 122 F. Raise temperature to 152 F and mash for 2 hrs. Mash out at168 F. Now you can add the Prerinsed rice hulls.

Stir them in well, but reserve 1/2 lb. for the bottom of your lauter tun. Sparge with pH 5.7 adjusted water. Adjust pH with either lactic acid or acid blend. Boil the wort 1 1/4 hrs. Chill quickly. Divide wort into 2 carboys and allow to settle for about 2 hrs. or until the cold break is well settled. Rack the wort into clean carboys, aerate well by shaking the carboys, then pitch your yeast.

Dry Munton Fison Ale yeast is excellent for this. Ferment at 68 F. When ferment is almost done, rack to secondary adding 1 tsp. of polyclar to each carboy. Allow to settle. This unfortunately is not sufficient to clarify the potato beer, but does remove astringency and makes for a smoother beer.

After a week rack again and add 1 packet of gelatin dissolved in hot water (do not boil your gelatin) and set the carboy in as cool a place as you can find (not freezing). When clear rack into your cornelius kegs and force carbonate. And/Or bottle. Age 3 months for a very smooth mellow ale with a very faint mashed potato flavor. The hops are very nice too.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 10281
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.141.103.148
Posted on Friday, May 01, 2009 - 07:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rice hulls occupy about twice the volume of malt. I have trouble considering a 5 gal. recipe that uses any more than 1.5 lbs. of rice hulls; 0.5 lbs. is more typical of recipes that use high percentages of oats or rye. I used to know a homebrewer who boiled a 10 lb. sack of potatoes (weight before peeling) and added them to his mash for an Irish stout recipe he brewed for his annual St. Patrick's Day party. I believe he used about 3/4 lb. of rice hulls to prevent a stuck sparge.
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 2569
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 24.248.74.254
Posted on Friday, May 01, 2009 - 08:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

upon further review, I agree. I have used rice hulls for an oatmeal stout and for my 10 gallon system, I only used 2 pounds of rice hulls and that was quite sufficient.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 6594
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.83.191.159
Posted on Friday, May 01, 2009 - 08:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It looks like the consensus is that potatos need to be cooked. Is peeling them really necessary?

Now to work out a way to cook enough for a two barrel batch. I would like to get 25% of my starch from them.
 

PaulK
Advanced Member
Username: Paulk

Post Number: 809
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 68.63.203.31
Posted on Friday, May 01, 2009 - 09:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Peeling goes without question in my opinion. I wouldn't want that earthy flavor taking over the beer.
 

Bob Wall
Senior Member
Username: Brewdudebob

Post Number: 2570
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 98.192.7.62
Posted on Friday, May 01, 2009 - 10:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

+1 PaulK
 

Bob Boufford
Intermediate Member
Username: Bobb

Post Number: 427
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 96.52.166.10
Posted on Saturday, May 02, 2009 - 06:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan,

No mention of gelatinization in the article. He does mention peeling the potatoes.

Personally, I think if the potatoes are well scrubbed and there is no growth from the buds or "eyes", the skins shouldn't impart that much flavor and would be about the same as grain husks in the mash. Probably depends on the variety of the potato such as baking potatoes with the thick leathery skin compared to the small gold or red potatoes with the thin edible skin.

Bob
 

Jeff Swearengin
Senior Member
Username: Beertracker

Post Number: 1263
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 216.97.167.75
Posted on Saturday, May 02, 2009 - 08:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Being both an amateur chef & gardener + I admittedly watch Alton Brown on occasion, I just thought I'd mention that not all potatoes (sweet or not) are created equal. Some varieties will be better suited to fermented related sports than others. In OK, we grow a variety of sweet potato called Redgold that I've "spurmented" with before. In a related yarn, yams aren't sweet potatoes... but I recently enjoyed Trade Route's Purple Yam Porter which I thought had a unique (earthy) character from the Ubes.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 6597
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.83.191.159
Posted on Thursday, May 07, 2009 - 08:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just boiled 3.3 pounds of sweet potatos for 45 minutes, squished them and then mashed them with a pound of Briess Pale ale in .75 gallons of water. It was totally converted in about 20 minutes. The consistency of the mash is pretty normal looking.

I see that Bells has produced a sweet potato stout. Any ideas about the percentages they used?
 

Jeff Swearengin
Senior Member
Username: Beertracker

Post Number: 1269
Registered: 03-2002
Posted From: 216.97.167.75
Posted on Thursday, May 07, 2009 - 08:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My guess would be no more than 10% for additional fermentables.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 6598
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.83.191.159
Posted on Friday, May 08, 2009 - 01:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

10% barely deserves mentioning. I feel that at least 25% of this sort of thing is needed to make it into its name. I think that 50% can be done with care and a lot of rice hulls.