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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2010 * Archive through April 28, 2010 * What yeast for a tripel? < Previous Next >

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Tex Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Texbrewer

Post Number: 546
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.203.59.252
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 02:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wyeast suggests seven different yeasts as suitable for a tripel (3538, 3787, 3944, 1214, 1388, 3522, 3942). Commercial tripels I have particularly liked are Boulevard Long Strange Tripel and Bosteels Tripel Karmeliet. I have tried the 3522 Belgian Ardennes in another brew and liked it a lot. Don't know if it would be best for a tripel, though. What do you think?
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 11550
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.141.103.148
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 02:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There are lots of choices. Two of my favorites are Wyeast 3864 (the Unibroue strain) and Wyeast 3787 (used by Westmalle/Achel/Westvleteren). Wyeast 1214 also works if you are a little careful about not letting it get too warm (not over the low 70s F). I have a pack of Wyeast 3522 that I intend to try relatively soon.
 

Chumley
Senior Member
Username: Chumley

Post Number: 6093
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 63.118.227.254
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 03:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

3787 makes a great tripel.

Another one I've liked is Wyeast 1762 (Rochefort) fermented in the low 60s. It makes a real fruity tripel without a lot of the spicier phenolics.
 

Marc Rehfuss
Member
Username: Marc_rehfuss

Post Number: 196
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 76.200.141.86
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 03:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a tripel on tap now made with Wyeast 3739 Flanders Golden Ale. Light peppery/spicy clove along with light citrus, but overall clean and "malty". It's the Gulden Draak strain, IIRC. Usually I use 3787 for my tripels and 3739 was a great change. Went 1.084 all the way to 1.004, yet doesn't taste thin. Must be all that alcohol. Not hot either.
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 7394
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 67.139.233.130
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 05:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm a huge fan of WY3787, but then I'm a huge fan of Westmalle tripel. I figure that they invented the style, they should know what it should taste like!
 

Tex Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Texbrewer

Post Number: 547
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.203.59.252
Posted on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 07:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Based on Greg Gettman's posts on the 1388 thread, he suggests that two yeast strains are often appropriate for Belgians. Do you think that might apply here? My feeling is that tripel is a comparatively "clean" Belgian style and may not be as amenable to such a melding of flavors and character.
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 7395
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Wednesday, April 07, 2010 - 04:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Personally, I don't feel that 2 strains are ever needed, let alone appropriate, for Trappist styles.
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1111
Registered: 07-2007
Posted From: 173.9.91.69
Posted on Wednesday, April 07, 2010 - 05:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recently made a Dubbel with the dry strain of T-58 and have to say that it is one of the finest Dubbels that I have ever made.

I believe that the T-58 strain would be great for a tripel.

The Profile of the yeast seems to be that of the Westmalle Dubbel and Tripel

---------------------------------------

Specs:

Safbrew T-58
Dry brewing yeast
Ingredients: Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), rehydrating agent

Properties: A speciality yeast selected for its estery somewhat peppery and spicy flavour development.

Sedimentation: medium. Final gravity: high.
Also recommended for bottle-conditioning of beers.

Excellent performance in beers with alcohol contents of up to 8.5% v/v but can ferment up to 11.5% v/v.

Dosage: 50 g/hl to 80 g/hl in primary fermentation. 2.5 g/hl to 5.0 g/hl in bottle-conditioning.

Pitching instructions: Re-hydrate the dry yeast into yeast cream in a stirred vessel prior to pitching. Sprinkle the dry
yeast in 10 times its own weight of sterile water or wort at 27C 3C (80F 6F).

Once the expected weight of dry yeast is reconstituted into cream by this method (this takes about 15 to
30 minutes), maintain a gentle stirring for another 30 minutes. Then pitch the resultant cream
into the fermentation vessel.

Alternatively, pitch dry yeast directly in the fermentation vessel providing the temperature of
the wort is above 20C (68F).

Progressively sprinkle the dry yeast into the wort ensuring the yeast covers all the surface of wort available in order to avoid clumps. Leave for 30 minutes
and then mix the wort e.g. using aeration.

Fermentation temperature: Recommended fermentation temperature: 15C 24C (59-75F)

Packaging: 4 x 38 x 11.5 g nitrogen-flushed sachets in cardboard box.

Storage: Store in cool (< 10C/50F), dry conditions.

Opened sachets must be sealed and stored at 4C (39F) and used within 7 days of opening.
Do not use soft or damaged sachets.

Shelf life: Refer to best before end date on sachets. 24 months from production date under recommended storage conditions.

Typical analysis: % dry weight: 94.0 96.5
Viable cells at packaging: > 6 x 109 / gramme
Total bacteria*: < 5 / ml
Acetic acid bacteria*: < 1 / ml
Lactobacillus*: < 1 / ml
Pediococcus*: < 1 / ml
Wild yeast non Saccharomyces*: < 1 / ml
Pathogenic micro-organisms: in accordance with regulation

*when dry yeast is pitched at 100 g/hl i.e. > 6 x 106 viable cells / ml

Important notice: Please note that any change to a fermentation process may alter the final product quality.

We therefore advise that fermentation trials are carried out prior to using our yeast commercially.


(Message edited by skotrat on April 07, 2010)
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 7396
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 140.211.82.4
Posted on Wednesday, April 07, 2010 - 07:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've made some pretty decent tripels with T-58, but I'm kinda surprised to hear you compare it to Westmalle yeast, Scott. It's never tasted like that to me, but maybe that's just my tastebuds.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 7066
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 74.83.191.159
Posted on Wednesday, April 07, 2010 - 08:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alternatively, pitch dry yeast directly in the fermentation vessel providing the temperature of
the wort is above 20C (68F).
 

tim roth
Advanced Member
Username: Hopdude

Post Number: 790
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 207.118.250.223
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2010 - 12:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is crazy! I went through my notes twice and I have only ever made ONE Trippel!
I used wyeast#1762.
It was slow to come together but was excellent with some age (8-10 months).
cheers,tim
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1112
Registered: 07-2007
Posted From: 173.9.91.69
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2010 - 04:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Denny Writes: I've made some pretty decent tripels with T-58, but I'm kinda surprised to hear you compare it to Westmalle yeast, Scott. It's never tasted like that to me, but maybe that's just my tastebuds.

Yep... To me that is the flavor profile. Especially on the Dubbel that I just brewed. I will have to do a side by side just to see...
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 7397
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 67.139.233.130
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2010 - 04:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey, Scott, what temp did you ferment it at? I always am in the low 60s with T-58. Maybe that's the difference.
 

Skotrat
Senior Member
Username: Skotrat

Post Number: 1113
Registered: 07-2007
Posted From: 173.9.91.69
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2010 - 05:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The Brew Cave was in the 65-68f range during this time
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2385
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 72.15.105.173
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2010 - 07:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just made a Blond with T-58 and a Dubbel with 3787. Both were fermented in the low 60's. I oxygenated both well. The T-58 was rehydrated prior to pitching, and the 3787 was pitched from a 2L starter.

I find, at least in these two examples, the T-58 to be more fruity and more juicy-fruit-like in its profile than the 3787. The phenols are there but are much more restrained than with the 3787. Given these fermentation conditions, though, the 3787 was also lightly phenolic, though more so than the T-58. I like the overall balance better. This is basically consistent with my memory of using both on other beers as well, except in my prior uses of 3787 I remember it being considerably more phenolic. I probably fermented it a few degrees warmer.
 

Tex Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Texbrewer

Post Number: 548
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.203.59.252
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2010 - 07:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sounds like 3787 is the classic one to use. Nobody has tried the 3522 Belgian Ardennes yet?

Greg Gettman, if you're reading, I'd like your thoughts on using two yeasts for this style. I tend to agree with Denny that it's not appropriate, but I have no experience to back it up.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 11553
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.141.103.148
Posted on Thursday, April 08, 2010 - 10:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I find Wyeast 3787 to be something of a chameleon. It will work even at 58-60 degrees F. At that temperature it's quite malty, enough so that I would consider it for a biere de garde. Fermented in the low 70s F, however, it's considerably more phenolic, just as Graham describes.

I have a pack of Wyeast 3522 I will be using in a N'Ice Chouffe clone in the next couple of weeks. That's a very strong beer (10 percent ABV), so it will be some time before I can comment on the results.
 

Paul Hayslett
Senior Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 2467
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 71.234.45.166
Posted on Friday, April 09, 2010 - 01:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Be very careful with 3522. I find that it can generate HUGE amounts of phenols, leaving a very harsh-tasting beer. This is not something I pick up in Chouffe beers, so they must know how to tame it. Time helps, so your N'Ice clone will probably be okay. But I'd recommend keeping the fermentation on the cooler side at first, ramping up the temp only toward the end.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 11558
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.141.103.148
Posted on Friday, April 09, 2010 - 01:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Paul. I'll definitely keep that in mind.
 

Denny Conn
Senior Member
Username: Denny

Post Number: 7398
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 75.145.77.185
Posted on Friday, April 09, 2010 - 02:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I use 3522 frequently for Chouffe like things and especially Belg/American IPA. Running it in the low 60s I get restrained fruitiness and a kinda tart, spicy profile that really goes well with American hops.
 

Mike Vachow
Member
Username: Mike

Post Number: 194
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 68.165.156.82
Posted on Friday, April 09, 2010 - 10:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've used 3787 and 3944 for tripels and dubbels. I almost always ferment high gravity beers of any sort on second generation yeast. With Belgian styles, I brew a wit or a mid-OG beer like DeKoninck first, then pitch the big beer on the yeast cakes. I always feel more comfortable dropping the fermentation temps on high-OG beers when I have a lot of yeast. I like my tripels a little cleaner than my dubbels.
It's also nice to be drinking wit while racking the big beer to secondary.