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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2011 * Archive through March 01, 2011 * Yeast and health < Previous Next >

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Tex Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Texbrewer

Post Number: 647
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.203.59.252
Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2011 - 10:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My wife has a new doctor who says she needs to cut back on/cut out yeast and products that promote yeast. Says yeast in the gut can get out of hand and cause health problems. That means alcohol, malt, vinegar, white flour/sugar, bread, and other things (like home brew, obviously). I am suspicious of this. I've never heard that consuming yeast is problem for normal people. Many people take yeast as a supplement. Is that suddenly a bad thing? Some people, esp. women, do get yeast infections, and it can be related to excessive and repeated use of antibiotics (does not apply to my wife).

What collective wisdom do we have on eliminating yeast from the diet?
 

Brad On Bass
Junior Member
Username: August_west

Post Number: 40
Registered: 11-2010
Posted From: 72.88.50.88
Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2011 - 11:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I knew a guy who got bad yeast infections on his feet and claimed that food/drink with yeast, especially beer, exacerbated the problem. That's but one data point.

Our guts are an entire ecosystem of microflora in themselves, and the balance within is extremely complex. If I had to guess I would venture to say that an imbalance in bacteria levels was more to blame for "out of hand" yeast growth than actual consumption of yeast. The use of antibiotics can be detrimental because antibiotics don't differentiate between helpful and harmful bacteria and can throw this balance out of whack by making way for more harmful and opportunistic strains.

One of the main benefits of gut microflora is fermentation of non-digestible energy sources, so from a home-brew standpoint I would say it's not a problem.
 

mikel
Intermediate Member
Username: Mikel

Post Number: 298
Registered: 02-2001
Posted From: 166.232.167.97
Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2011 - 11:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am not a doctor but I believe the yeast they are referring to is Candida. People who have candida imbalances do indeed need to stop eating foods that promote candida. Basically any form of sugars or simple/refined carbohydrates. My understanding is that it's not problematic to eat brewing yeast itself as that won't promote candida. It's the sugar in the diet and elevated overall sugars and simple/refined carbohydrate diets.

Again, I don't really know what I'm talking about but assuming it's not a life threatening situation moderation and a balanced diet seems appropriate.
 

Bierview
Advanced Member
Username: Bierview

Post Number: 934
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 69.125.118.54
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011 - 12:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recently heard a doctor on the radio touting a vitamin product that contained a lot of B-5. Having never heard of B-5 I continued to listen. Apparently the vitamin has a lot to do with normal operations of the adrenal glads. The adrenals do more for the body than most people realize. One of the sources.........brewers yeast. So swirl those homebrew bottles and drink up all that B-5.
 

Josh Vogel
New Member
Username: Loopie_beer

Post Number: 24
Registered: 02-2011
Posted From: 65.60.138.116
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011 - 12:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Good point Bierview. I also read where yeast sediment / B-5 helps with hangovers. Any one know about this. I used to know a girl (long before brewing) who would always take a vitamin B the day after drinking and SWORE by it. Maybe some truth in it...
 

mikel
Intermediate Member
Username: Mikel

Post Number: 300
Registered: 02-2001
Posted From: 166.232.167.97
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011 - 01:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have had good results with Source Naturals Hangover Formula. Take three tablets with several glasses of water before going to bed. It has B5, B6, B12 as well as other things in it.

Though I've heard the best remedy is Duvel.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 12624
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.49.181
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011 - 01:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

TB, I'm certainly not a doctor, so I won't directly try to refute what your wife was told. But I will say I think it would be prudent for her to seek a second opinion.
 

Graham Cox
Senior Member
Username: T2driver

Post Number: 2671
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 12.187.9.2
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011 - 04:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bill's being too nice. Tex, does your wife have some sort of digestive issues? If not, that doctor is, IMHO, at best a dietary zealot who has been badly misled, or, at worst, a kook who is misleading others.

Regarding the B-vitamin issue, brewer's yeast is an excellent source of B-complex vitamins, and alcohol is a very effective depleter of same. Ironic, isn't it.

Regarding female yeast infections, Mikel is correct that the most common culprit is Candida albicans. Avoiding bread and beer is utterly unrelated and seriously calls into question the doctor's logic.

Now, regarding yeast in general, yeast of many genera are all over much of what we eat, especially fruit. They are ubiquitous in the environment. You can't avoid yeast without starving yourself. Now, you could partially avoid Saccharomyces spp. if you so chose, but why would you? There are no pathogenic species or serovars of which science is aware. About the only thing I can think of that could possibly lead this doctor to think this way is a hypothetical situation where the balance of the intestinal flora somehow became badly skewed towards yeast at the expense of, for example, the normal lactic acid bacteria that would/should be present. Sorry, Doc, the gut doesn't work that way.

That said, one of the primary by-products of yeast fermentation is CO2 gas, which, as the honest homebrewer will attest to, can lead to bloating and gas. A good management technique is to deliberately consume lactic acid bacteria from time to time from sources such as yogurt. Homofermentative species of Lactobacillus, for example, product lactic acid exclusively and not CO2 gas. This does help to keep things in balance. This is in keeping with eating a reasonably balanced diet and adhering to the common-sense "all things in moderation" philosophy instead of what it, again IMHO, a radical and baseless approach such as eliminating a natural food that has been a staple in man's diet and intestinal flora for thousands of years, at least.
 

Nephalist
Intermediate Member
Username: Nephi

Post Number: 461
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 71.135.237.218
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011 - 05:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This article suggests that Candida is the most prevalent yeast from a set of people with non-specific gastrointestinal disorder. Not sure if your wife is in that category.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20731244

"The fungal flora isolated was as follows: C. albicans 70.9% of the isolates, Candida non-albicans 20.8% (including C krusei 3.40%, C. parapsilosis 1.88%, C. glabrata 1.59%), other genera 8.34% (including S. cerevisiae 5.58%, Geotrichum sp. 1.16%, and Trichosporon sp. 1.01%)."
 

mikel
Intermediate Member
Username: Mikel

Post Number: 301
Registered: 02-2001
Posted From: 166.234.33.130
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011 - 04:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My limited understanding is that Candida isn't isolated to just yeast infections but also can be out of balance in the intestinal tract thus the reasoning behind a restricted diet while the GI system restores it's balance. I don't see why it's so improbable to have an out of balance GI system. There are some that believe the GI system is the first line of defense from disease, where a healthy system can effectively destroy harmful bacteria and virus's that enter the gut through the mouth or nose. There seems to be allot of prescription use of antacids and a surprising amount of highly refined sugars and carbohydrates in the processed food stream, corn and wheat specifically.
 

Doug Pescatore
Senior Member
Username: Doug_p

Post Number: 2298
Registered: 10-2002
Posted From: 141.232.1.1
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011 - 04:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My daughter had a "touch" of this. It is not that she had yeast in her digestive track but that she had the wrong ones in the wrong proportions. They could actually tell this by doing a chemical analysis of her breath. She was not advised to stay away from products with yeast. She was give antibiotics to upset the balance of yeasties in her gut and then started on pro-biotic yeast suppliments to get the right balance. The interesting thing we learned is that you can get an over population of the good yeast in your upper digestive track vs. the lower which would then cause more digestive distress. That is why she was only given the pro-biotics for a finite period of time.

This was a couple of years ago and she hasn't really had issues since then. She still has a bit of a sensitive stomach but she is fully aware of what causes the sensitivity and she is fine. I think (if my memory serves me correctly) the issue of the upper GI yeast populations is based on being prone to it. That is why the doctor we went to was not a big fan of people taking pro-biotics and such over the counter without consulting a doctor. Some people just should not take in too much of even the good yeast.

Doug
 

Tex Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Texbrewer

Post Number: 648
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 216.203.59.252
Posted on Friday, February 25, 2011 - 05:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Some excellent posts, here, thank you all. I look forward to more such postings. My wife is consulting her ob-gyn and her internist for more opinions.

It makes no sense to me if you have a yeast problem (which would almost certainly be Candida--thanks for the link, Nephi), that consumption of Saccharomyces or bread yeast (or carbohydrates, vinegar, alcohol) would have any effect on this.
 

Tom Gardner
Senior Member
Username: Tom

Post Number: 1221
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 67.177.226.129
Posted on Saturday, February 26, 2011 - 05:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Bill's being too nice. Tex, does your wife have some sort of digestive issues? If not, that doctor is, IMHO, at best a dietary zealot who has been badly misled, or, at worst, a kook who is misleading others."
+1, but I think the official term is "quack".
What type of "doctor"? I would be happy to look into their credentials if you'd like.
 

Tex Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Texbrewer

Post Number: 649
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 69.148.168.207
Posted on Saturday, February 26, 2011 - 09:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dr. Amy Myers. Here is her web site http://www.dramymyers.com/
 

Tom Gardner
Senior Member
Username: Tom

Post Number: 1222
Registered: 01-2001
Posted From: 67.177.226.129
Posted on Saturday, February 26, 2011 - 11:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was pleasantly surprised. She graduated from the LSU School of Medicine and did her residency training in ER medicine at the U. of Maryland Hospital (top notch). She received her medical license from the Texas Medical Board in 2008. It is current and I found no complaints with the Board. She even spent 2 years in the Peace Corps after college.

She practiced ER medicine before starting her current business. ER medicine and "functional medicine" are at about the opposite ends of the medical care spectrum.

I would recommend the second opinions that you mentioned. And ask Dr. Myers for any evidence-based studies explaining the treatment regimen.

Or look at the bright side. SWMBO could be a built-in designated driver!

Good luck.
 

Tex Brewer
Advanced Member
Username: Texbrewer

Post Number: 650
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 69.148.168.207
Posted on Sunday, February 27, 2011 - 02:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow, I'm impressed at your research, Tom. Thank you. We are getting other opinions, and will ask about the evidence-based studies. If I find more information of interest to the board, I will post it.