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Brews & Views Bulletin Board Service * Brews and Views Archive 2011 * Archive through December 10, 2011 * New Bud Lite < Previous Next >

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Connie
Senior Member
Username: Connie

Post Number: 1650
Registered: 10-2000
Posted From: 98.230.141.204
Posted on Wednesday, November 09, 2011 - 12:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

http://money.msn.com/ways-to-invest/articles.aspx?post=05224a17-7c5e-4653-9a47-7 113db20f08e
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 13359
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.49.181
Posted on Wednesday, November 09, 2011 - 12:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Anyone remember Bud Ice?! Total nonsense!
 

Tim Polster
Intermediate Member
Username: Bassman

Post Number: 446
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 75.47.121.13
Posted on Wednesday, November 09, 2011 - 07:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ad Age thinks that Anheuser-Busch is "trying to tap into the rising popularity of craft beers, which tend to be fuller bodied with more alcohol."

This is a little out of touch. If someone thinks adding 1.8% more alcohol to Bud Light makes it a craft beer they need to cover wine instead.

My father in law drinks "Steel Reserve" which is closer to 8% I thought this new Bud would be a competitor but at only 6% I do not know. He loves my homebrew but drinks the Steel Reserve for the kick. AB will always be AB.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 13363
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.49.181
Posted on Wednesday, November 09, 2011 - 07:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

They said the same thing when Michelob Amber Bock was introduced in 1998. Think of what has happened in craft brewing--and the American beer market--in the past 13 years. I'm convinced A-B is never going to "get it."
 

Robert
Intermediate Member
Username: Okierat

Post Number: 389
Registered: 05-2003
Posted From: 138.32.32.166
Posted on Wednesday, November 09, 2011 - 08:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

At 6% ABV and 137 calories would that not just regular Bud in a new can????
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 13364
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.49.181
Posted on Wednesday, November 09, 2011 - 08:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I believe regular Budweiser is 5 percent ABV.

If they think merely increasing the alcohol to 6 percent, the bittering to 20 IBUs and using a little less adjunct to increase body is going to win craft beer drinkers, they're laughably naive.
 

Josh Vogel
Junior Member
Username: Loopie_beer

Post Number: 78
Registered: 02-2011
Posted From: 65.60.214.75
Posted on Wednesday, November 09, 2011 - 09:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yeah, looks like Bud Light on steriods...
I do drink bud light, when I am going to drink for a long time.
I drink craft because the flavors are better, not because its "higher in alcohol." (damn, doesn't matter what I tell people about craft/homebrew they automatically assume it is "really high" in alcohol.)
 

Steve Ruch
Intermediate Member
Username: Rookie

Post Number: 286
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 209.240.206.194
Posted on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 04:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I thought I was going to see the retirement notice for the old horse they've been running the bud through right before bottling it.
 

Joel Gallihue
New Member
Username: Gallibrewer

Post Number: 6
Registered: 01-2010
Posted From: 108.15.76.226
Posted on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 04:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How many meetings led to this idea. I think if AB-Inbev required all of their marketing employees to either homebrew or become a bjcp judge the organization would inject a little more fun into that hard fought middle shelf at the package store.
 

Joel Gallihue
New Member
Username: Gallibrewer

Post Number: 7
Registered: 01-2010
Posted From: 108.15.76.226
Posted on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 04:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It is always amazing how we seem to give the big marketing food/bev companies mulligans over and over. By all rights things like McRib and Budlime should have sparked the culinary equivalent of an Arab Spring.
 

Tim Polster
Intermediate Member
Username: Bassman

Post Number: 449
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 75.47.121.13
Posted on Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 06:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I had a Bud the other day and it seriously tasted like green apple cider beer. I think they have totally left the beer rhelm for some sort of flavored alcohol beverage.

These huge companies can appear so narrow minded but the get the sales so something is resonating with the plebs.
 

Josh Vogel
Junior Member
Username: Loopie_beer

Post Number: 81
Registered: 02-2011
Posted From: 65.60.214.75
Posted on Friday, November 18, 2011 - 07:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"These huge companies can appear so narrow minded but the get the sales so something is resonating with the plebs."

Yeah I just read a rant somewhere about AB InBev competing against themselves with Bud Light, Platinum, Bud Select, Bud 55, etc. and how its taking profit from their own brands.

I say BS because when you own all of them what does it matter if one switches from bud light to bud select. The profit still goes to AB Inbev...
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 13392
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.49.181
Posted on Saturday, November 19, 2011 - 12:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

 

Josh Vogel
Junior Member
Username: Loopie_beer

Post Number: 82
Registered: 02-2011
Posted From: 65.60.214.75
Posted on Saturday, November 19, 2011 - 05:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Exactly Bill....

To me its like offering a car in different trim models. It all goes back to the manufacturer.
 

Michael Boyd
Intermediate Member
Username: Mlboyd

Post Number: 411
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 71.105.180.122
Posted on Saturday, November 26, 2011 - 06:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What I can't figure out is why the "big boys" seem oblivious to the realm of real beer. They could make any style of beer they wanted and make it, likely, better than anybody. They have the brightest scientists, the most modern equipment, access to the best ingredients and they try to capture the craft beer market by adding more alcohol? What, are they just dumping some more grain alcohol into their insipid swill? If they added more grain to the mash, they’d get more flavor and they don’t want that!

Anybody remember Miller Reserve Amber ale? I thought that would change face of American Mega-brewing. Oops.
 

Paul Hayslett
Senior Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 2958
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 75.67.113.25
Posted on Saturday, November 26, 2011 - 02:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a little more sympathy for the big boys after hearing an interview (on NPR -- yes, I'm a leftie) with a bigwig in the company which makes Necco Wafers. He was on an apology tour. They had made some small changes to recipes and colors and received an avalanche of negative responses from consumers. They figured that, relative to market size, it was far worse than the New Coke debacle. They have lost some consumers permanently, even if they now go back to all the old recipes.

Most consumers don't want anything on their table to change, least of all the most basic staples, which includes beer. They want the same beer they've always had. It is an island of stability and comfort in a frighteningly-changing world. They don't want to have to think about it or learn about it or read about it, and they most certainly don't want their beer to make them feel stupid and uneducated because they don't know as much as the beer snob on the next stool.

Salsa sales have risen dramatically over the past few decades. Heinz, with all their experience with tomatoes, could probably make killer salsa. But they probably fear that putting the Heinz name on salsa would freak out a lot of the loyal customers for whom Heinz is a synonym for ketchup. And they are probably right.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 13409
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.49.181
Posted on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 04:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

And apparently Heinz is willing to watch the share of ketchup dwindle in the market for condiments. There's no reason except for stubbornness they couldn't make salsa under another brand name.
 

John McElver
Member
Username: Johnmc

Post Number: 124
Registered: 04-2010
Posted From: 76.182.6.66
Posted on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 03:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul, I'm not a leftie and I listen to NPR :-) (Centrist, btw).

Michael, IMHO, I think Paul & Bill's Heinz discussion circled what happened to the Miller Reserve line (they had at least a stout, too); the Miller brand suffered for it. I think this is why they bought Leinenkuegel; it gave them a different brand, with a spiffy German name, to use to sell "craft" beer, in addition to absorbing the competition. It was right about when they bought Leinie the Reserve Line disappeared, followed by a bunch of new Leinie products.
FWIW, though, I liked the Reserve stout quite a bit.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 13410
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.49.181
Posted on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 04:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

And Paul, I think younger consumers tend to embrace change. Yes, they grow older and less adventuresome, but once the demographic bulge of Baby Boomers passes on, those businesses that stress conformity and familiarity--the bland, uniform marketing mantra of the post-WW II era--are going to find themselves left out in the cold. The emphasis today is on diversity and individuality. It's a different world.
 

Paul Hayslett
Senior Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 2960
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 75.67.113.25
Posted on Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 05:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Maybe. I see evidence on both side.

On one hand, I live close enough to Brooklyn to see the explosion of interest in interesting food and drink there. And even New Haven, decades late to the whole craft beer party, finally has 4 or 5 decent beer bars with enough patrons to keep them open. The local Whole Paycheck carries a good beer selection now too.

On the other, I was in the local liquor megamart last night at 7:00pm. I am never there late on a Saturday, preferring to shop when the crowds are light, but I needed something to bring to a party. As I stood in line, I inventoried the stuff in everyone's cart. It was mostly young guys and they mostly had 30-packs of Bud Light or Natural Light. The only person I could see, in 5 cash register lanes, with decent beer in his cart was a middle-aged guy. Clearly, the younger members of this crowd hadn't gotten the memo.

It was also pretty clear that the big guys aren't entirely stupid. In the lines I inventoried, the ratio was 20 guys buying at least 1 30-pack each of yellow fizz vs. 2 guys (me and the other craft beer guy) accounting for 2 6-packs and a growler. Yellow fizz is not yet in ketchup territory.
 

Dan Listermann
Senior Member
Username: Listermann

Post Number: 7872
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 166.249.99.114
Posted on Monday, November 28, 2011 - 01:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Getting a buzz is usually the focus of the yellow fizz crowd. I don't understand this as vodka is quicker, cheaper and you don't have to pee so much.
 

Rob Farrell
Advanced Member
Username: Robf

Post Number: 621
Registered: 02-2003
Posted From: 216.27.76.200
Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2011 - 04:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Unlike us old guys, the younger folks go both ways. My 26-year-old son loves my homebrew, especially Octoberfest and hoppy IPA's. He'll drink good beer with dinner or at a civilized party. But for a real binge, a 30-pack will always play a part.
 

Josh Vogel
Junior Member
Username: Loopie_beer

Post Number: 85
Registered: 02-2011
Posted From: 65.60.214.75
Posted on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 11:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul I think Dan and Rob are correct. Those younger people buying beer at 7pm are getting ready to get their buzz on rather than enjoying a good beer.
I too am guilty of this. If I am going to watch football and drink all day I will start off with a couple craft beers then switch to macro. No reason to waste good beer when its all starting to taste the same!

Unfortunately with the Macro's, they have to please an entire population. Most Macro's have to please a regional following making it much easier to get people to buy into their ideas and beer. 11% towards craft beer of the beer population is great and its great that it is growing but its nothing when you are talking about billions of people.
 

Jim DeShields
Member
Username: Niquejim

Post Number: 225
Registered: 07-2006
Posted From: 184.7.146.136
Posted on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 - 11:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The big brewers have really been able to grab that "how many calories" attitude by the balls and they are using it with great success.
I've never understood why Merlot light has never caught on?????????????????
 

Steve Ruch
Intermediate Member
Username: Rookie

Post Number: 295
Registered: 03-2003
Posted From: 66.96.79.211
Posted on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 12:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dan,
When I was young and the object was a quick buzz I went with tequela: did I spell that correctly? I'm not sure I ever knew how. :-)
 

Paul Hayslett
Senior Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 2962
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 75.67.113.25
Posted on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 12:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

For me, it was bourbon with a beer chaser. This is why I cannot handle any bourbon-barrel aged beers to this day. The combo brings up painful memories.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 13419
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.49.181
Posted on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 01:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have echoes of George Thorogood running around in my brain now, Paul. I'm glad I didn't overindulge on that combination. It means I can still enjoy sipping the occasional shot of Maker's Mark on the rocks, as well as bourbon barrel-aged beers.
 

Paul Hayslett
Senior Member
Username: Paulhayslett

Post Number: 2964
Registered: 02-2002
Posted From: 75.67.113.25
Posted on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 04:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm not terribly proud of some of my behavior as a teenager. I overindulged on a lot of different combinations, more combinations and more times than I'll admit in print before my children are 21. And, strangely enough, George Thorogood was involved in more than a few of them since he was based in Boston at the time and played a lot of shows in this area.

Luckily, I can still enjoy bourbon and beer in isolation. It's just the combo which bothers me.
 

Greg Brewer
Intermediate Member
Username: Greg_r

Post Number: 330
Registered: 03-2005
Posted From: 64.124.83.190
Posted on Thursday, December 01, 2011 - 07:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Paul, I can't enjoy barrel aged beers for the same reason! Glad to hear I am not alone, given all the raving over them. On the plus side, we benefit from not being tempted to pay the ridiculous prices they can command.
 

Jack Horzempa
Member
Username: Jack_horzempa

Post Number: 130
Registered: 02-2007
Posted From: 68.82.57.55
Posted on Friday, December 02, 2011 - 05:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Below is something I posted on another forum:

Permit me to get on my soap box. I am of the opinion that any US brewery that makes adjunct lagers (e.g., the BMC brewers, Yuengling, Lion, Genesee, City Brewery, and on and on) could make a good, authentic CAP if there are so inclined. I mean, they all made good/better beers back in 1900 for goodness sake. What it takes is the will and desire to make a flavorful beer like our grandfathers and great grandfathers drank!

Pretty simple 'process':

* Put some bittering hops in to get something like 40-45 IBUs. I would highly recommend Cluster hops but any 'good' bittering hops will do.
* Use corn but keep the percentage to around 20%. A bit of corn is good. A lot of corn (e.g., 50%) is bad.
* Utilize plenty of Noble (or similar to Noble) hops for flavor and aroma additions

It would be ideal that they would lager this beer for a respectable amount of time but if they want to utilize their same timeframes (e.g., 3 weeks of lagering) that might be OK as well.

Is it really too much to ask that US breweries make a CAP? I truly believe that there is a market there with craft breweries steadily increasing their market share and making a CAP is not 'hard'; it just takes adding some more hops for bittering/flavor/aroma and limiting the corn percentage.
 

Bill Pierce
Moderator
Username: Billpierce

Post Number: 13424
Registered: 01-2002
Posted From: 24.150.49.181
Posted on Friday, December 02, 2011 - 07:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jack, I've been asking for 15 years why Pabst doesn't produce a beer using the same or a similar recipe that won the blue ribbon at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago. It seems like such a no-brainer both from a brewing and marketing standpoint.