HOMEBREW Digest #2304 Thursday, January 9 1997

Digest #2303 Digest #2305
		(formerly Volume 02 : Number 024)



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Contents:
  5 litre mini-kegs
  Labels
  RE:trub
  Re: Welding Metallurgy
  EasyMasher Irish Moss Hop Plug Up
  Effect of mash thickness on body
  Re: Immersion chilling  and hop filtering   --     Jim Bentson
  Agressive Water
  Re:Husks, good or bad?
  All grain equipment
  Wanna sell a Stainless 15 Gal keg??
  Hop Comparison by Dry Hopping in the Bottle/  Don Van Valkenburg
  Clarity / Haze / Hot break
  ph-meter elektrodes
  ph-meter elektrodes
  Re: Big Head
  Re: Homebrew Digest V2 #23
  Sorry
  Re: Sources of Agar
  Weyermann Malz (Bob McCowan)
  immersion chiller/filtering wort, Dan Ritter
  Re: sources of agar
  Re: EasyMasher Clogging
  mead/beer on an aircraft
  Re: time fermenting
  New Fermentation Chiller Plans Now On-Line
  Re: Belgian carbonation, bulk grain


---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 14:13:00 -0700 (MST) From: Ian Smith <rela!isrs at netcom.com> Subject: 5 litre mini-kegs Does anyone know what the 5 l mini-kegs are made of ? I have seen aluminum and also advertisements for steel. I would like to obtain a stainless steel mini-keg. Also I was told that you can only pressurize the kegs to 7-10 psi for dispensing. Forced carbonation pressure of 30 psi can cause bulging. I called the manufacturer's distributer in th U.S. (they are made in Germany) and they are rated to 3 bar (45 psi). Does anyone have any experience with these kegs to the contrary ? Cheers Ian Smith isrs at rela.uucp.netcom.com Return to table of contents
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 13:41:46 CST From: "Bert H. Chew" <bchew at juno.com> Subject: Labels Hi everyone, I am about ready to bottle my first batch. I would like to make labels with my PC. I was wondering if anyone knew of some good label stock to use with an inkjet printer that would be EASY to remove after the bottles were empty? Thanks Bert H. Chew bchew at juno.com Return to table of contents
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 1997 16:26:58 -0600 From: Steve Potter <spotter at Meriter.com> Subject: RE:trub Dave writes: > Is there any non-anecdotal information that says that leaving trub >in the wort affects flavor adversely? My beers always settle and are clear >after fermentation so I curious if we need to care. Last year our homebrew club (First Draft Brewclub- Madison, WI) did a split batch of very light lager. We brewed 5 gals of very light (translation: tasteless) lager and split it into two fermenters. We were extremely careful about removing the trub from one 3 gal glass fermenter and did what we could to include the trub in another. We followed our usual areation routine which at the time consisted of 15 minutes with an aquarium pump and 5 micron stone. We noticed the following differences with the two batches: 1. The batch with the trub got off to a quicker ferment. 2. The color of the batch with trub was slightly darker. 3. There was a just noticable "fatty-soapy" taste to the batch with trub that was absent in the batch without. Just one data point. Cheers! Return to table of contents
Date: 8 Jan 1997 13:35:13 U From: "Palmer.John" <palmer at ssdgwy.mdc.com> Subject: Re: Welding Metallurgy George asked: I had some free welding done to put nipples on my stainless steel kettles (get your mind out of the gutter). The guy must have overheated the metal on one of them because the area around the weld rusted after just a few hours in contact with water! Is there a way to make it stainless again, or am I now the proud owner of a 15.5 gallon sort-of-stainless conversation piece? There are a couple possiblities here: 1. The welder used the wrong weld rod. Cant fix that. 2. The weld did get too hot and carbided all the protective chromium. Cant fix that. 3. The weld may have been okay, you just needed to clean it and let it repassivate for a couple weeks before use. To fix #3, take a scouring pad (not steel wool) and a cleanser such as Revereware, Kleen King or Bar Keeper's Friend and scour the rust area around the weld off. Rinse with clean water and dry. Let it sit indoors for 2 weeks and it will be as good (ie. oxide protected) as it can get. You may have no further problems. If it does rust, then you have either the first or second situation. and you're hosed. Good Luck, John John J. Palmer - Metallurgist for MDA-ISS M&P johnj at primenet.com Huntington Beach, California Palmer House Brewery and Smithy - www.primenet.com/~johnj/ PS. Next week (Monday) I start my new job. I will be working for 3M in Product Development. The primenet address will still work of course, but the palmer at ssdgwy.mdc.com will be inactive. Return to table of contents
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 17:56:20 -0500 (EST) From: KennyEddy at aol.com Subject: EasyMasher Irish Moss Hop Plug Up Just thought I'd toss in my blah-blah on the EasyMasher clogging thread, since my boiler is so outfitted (it's a fake but don't tell JS -- rolled the screen cut from a small SS kitchen strainer around the valve fitting inside the boiler, hose-clamped it in place, folded & crimped the open end). Before I installed the ersatz EM, whole hops were clogging my valve (duh). Prior to my whole-hop days, pellet hops worked great with the plain valve. I added the counterfeit EM after a couple of stuck whole-hop boiler drain-offs. When I use whole hops with the phony EM, the Irish moss never causes any trouble and I get fast runoff into the fermenter. I agree with Alex (I think it was him) that the break is settling on the hops, since when I clean the boiler out after transferring the wort to the fermenter, the hops are coated with a slimy layer of goo. Once since I installed the fraudulent EM I used pellet hops only. Clog city. Pellets? Irish moss? Probably both. The moral of the story is that success in using an EM (whether Genuine (tm) or sham) in a boiler has more to do with the style of hops (pellets vs plugs/whole) that you use. Attaching the imitation EM with a hose clamp makes it removable should I again brew with pellets (which I surely will). BTW I don't whirlpool my wort since the electric elements would quickly break up a good whirlpool anyway. My immersion chiller is built into the boiler lid and is therefore suspended in the top half to two-thirds of the wort volume. This allows me to gently swing the chiller to enhance cooling, without stirring up the muck too badly. ***** Ken Schwartz El Paso, TX KennyEddy at aol.com http://members.aol.com/kennyeddy Return to table of contents
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 19:12:51 -0500 From: Jean-Sebastien Morisset <jsmoriss at qc.bell.ca> Subject: Effect of mash thickness on body I'm wondering what effect mash thickness (1qt/lbs vs 1.1qt/lbs) has on body. I seem to remember that a thicker mash tends to promote enzyme activity and lower extraction rates. Is this correct? If so, does a 0.1qt/lbs difference affect mouth feel at all, or is it simply a matter of conversion speed/efficiency? Thanks, js. - -- Jean-Sebastien Morisset, Sc. Unix Administrator <mailto:jsmoriss at qc.bell.ca> Bell Canada, Routing and Trunking Asignments <http://www.bell.ca> Return to table of contents
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 1997 20:22:10 -0500 From: Jim Bentson <jbentson at htp.net> Subject: Re: Immersion chilling and hop filtering -- Jim Bentson In HBD V2 #21 Alex Santic picked up the thread on immersion chillers. I agree with Alex but would like to add some additional info. The immersion chiller that is left motionless is less efficient than moving the chiller slowly in an up and down (or side to side ) motion.The motion must be slow and it is obviously important not to set up splashing and air entrainment to avoid HSA in the early stages of cooling. The motion of the coil causes a flow over the coil (forced convection) rather than relying on the motion of the fluid due to thermal buoyancy (free convection). In addition,(and more important for mixing) , the slow motion is constantly changing direction at the end of each cycle. This sheds what aerodynamicists call a starting vortex off each coil as the coil accelerates during the change in direction. These vortices are like little whirpools which are very effective in mixing the cold layer of wort near the coil into the hotter body of wort. The only down side of this method compared to Alex's suggestion is that the pot is uncovered, but I have done this for 3 years and never spoiled a batch. On the practical side I use about 3 inches of motion (peak to peak) and take about 2 sec to complete a full up and down cycle. I prefer the vertical motion because the thermal currents are vertical and you want the most effective mixing. I also have a slight twist on the Easymasher idea for screening the wort from the hops in the boiling kettle. Instead of drilling a hole in my kettle, I simply made a racking cane out of 3/8 in stainless steel tubing and then put an additional 90 deg bend at the bottom so the tube is parallel to the pot bottom. To this I affix a stainless screen mesh tube ala the Easymasher. The main advantage I find is that when used with hop pellets the screens often clog. With the kettle fixed version, You have to unclog the screen while it is under your wort. With the racking cane version I simply lift it out, immerse it in a pot of boiling water I keep ready and scrub it with a sterile brush. Granted I must restart the syphon but there are plenty of techniques and devices to do that in a safe manner . Hope this helps someone to brew a quicker and better beer. Jim Bentson - -- Registered ICC User check out http://www.usefulware.com/~jfoltz Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 01:59:12 -0500 From: "A. J. deLange" <ajdel at mindspring.com> Subject: Agressive Water Mike Urseth asked about blue stains from well water. The stains, as have been noted, are from copper dissolved from the pipes. The real question is "What kind of water dissolves copper?" The answer is "aggressive water" and so what we really want to know is what makes water aggressive. It is in fact the relationship between the pH of the water and the pH at which the particular water sample is saturated with respect to calcium carbonate. If the pH of the water is greater than or equal to the saturation pH calcium carbonate will precipitate onto the pipe wall coating and protecting it from direct contact with the water. Corrosion (dissolution of copper) will not occur. If, conversely, the pH of the water is less than the saturation pH, any calcium carbonate coating will be dissolved and the pipe (copper or otherwise) will be attacked by the water and dissolved. Note that this doesn't happen overnight but eventually the pipes spring pin-prick leaks. The saturation pH of a water sample is approximately pHs = pK2 - pKs + p[Ca+2] + p[HCO3-] + 5 pfm where pK2 is -log(second dissociation constant of carbonic acid) = 10.33 at 25C), pKs is -log(solubility product of calcium carbonate) = 8.48 for calcite at 25C); p[Ca+2] is -log(calcium ion concentration) = -log(calcium hardness as ppm CaCO3/50000); p[HCO3-] = -log(bicarbonate ion concentration) = -log(alkalinity as ppm CaCO3/50000) for sample pH < 8.3 and pfm is an ionic activity factor which can be approximated by pfm = 0.023 + (Total Dissolved Soilds in ppm)*4.517E-5. Thus hard, alkaline waters (waters with a lot of temporary hardness) will have low pHs values and will not be corrosive. Very soft water (even if it is somewhat alkaline!) or water with only permanent hardness will have high saturation pHs values and will be very corrosive. The worst water in this regard is deionized water such as distilled water or RO water. You will notice that this stuff is always run through plastic pipe for this reason. Thus one cannot do more than generalize as we have already done as to what kind of water will cause corrosion. There are a couple of indices which are supposed to predict the aggressiveness of water. The Langelier index SI = pH - pHs SI < 0 indicates corrosive water with the speed of corrosion increasing as the magnitude of SI increases. Another is the Ryznar Index RI = 2pHs - pH whose interpretation ranges from "Occlusion of conduit" for values < 4 through "Little scale or corrosion" for 6 < RI < 7 to "Corrosion intollerable to metal surfaces) for values > 9. As for the effect on beer that depends on the particulars of what minerals are in the water. Certainly copper in the beer to the level it can be tasted is not desireable. This can be avoided by running the water through the pipes long enough to flush the copper bearing water out (the rate of dissolution is gradual enough that this usually works). You really need to get a water analysis. Note that interesting situations sometimes arise. Well water is often quite acidic due to dissolved CO2 and hard enough that the water people can convince the homeowner that he needs a softener to prevent scale formation in his water heater and a neutralizer because the water is aggressive enough to corrode his pipes (it isn't hard enough to lower the saturation pH that far). The neutralizer dissolves limestone into the water helping in two ways: the pH goes up and the saturation pH comes down because the water is now harder. Then, thewater is run through a softener which knocks the calcium ion concentration down to a couple of ppm raising pHs back up a couple of pH units and the water is back to being aggressive. A knowlegeable water system contractor should understand all this and recommend, for example, an aerator rather than a neutralizer to drop the pH and/or a KCl charge ion exchanger rather than a NaCl charged one. A. J. deLange - - Numquam in dubio, saepe in errore. Please Note New e-mail Address Return to table of contents
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 1997 18:26:05 -0800 From: Kelly Jones <kejones at ptdcs2.intel.com> Subject: Re:Husks, good or bad? Bill Giffin makes some interesting, but incomplete, statements about malt components and balance: > Lets take an extreme example. If you brew a beer with an original > gravity of 1.050 and you use 10 pounds of grain to brew that beer, then > you will have 36% more husk material then another brewer who can brew the > same beer with 7.35 pounds of malt. I feel that this is a good reason to > get your brewing efficiencies up to make better beer. > Balance of all the ingredients is essential. The > balance of the different malt fractions to each other. What you haven't explained, is why the malt fractions are any different in the first case than in the second case. Sure, you have more husks in the first case. But you also have more of every other malt fraction. How is the balance shifted? You used more malt in the first case presumably because you were extracting less sugars, etc. Wouldn't you also extract less tannin, silicates, husk fractions, or whatever? Why or how would the balance be any different? Kelly Hillsboro, OR Return to table of contents
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 22:18:03 -0500 From: "Dale T. Kelly" <DKelly7 at ix.netcom.com> Subject: All grain equipment This is a multi-part message in MIME format. - ------=_NextPart_000_01BBFDB1.D0847140 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I am trying to get into doing all grain brewing but I don't know what equipment to purchase. If anyone is selling anything please let me know. Also, Pico brewing systems in Michigan have an all grain system consisting of three 20 qt. pots with all the fittings, a wort chiller, and other things as well for $400. Does this sound like a good price. This specific setup would allow for all of the brewing to be done on a typical stovetop which is exactly what I am looking for due to the fact that I live in an apartment. The setup is for 5-8 gallons. I recently received this fax and there are also a lot of even bigger systems in the catalog for up to 100 gallons. There are nice kits for 15-25 gallon batches for about $1300. If anyone is interested in this catalog send me an e-mail and I can get it to you by fax. Thanks again. - ------=_NextPart_000_01BBFDB1.D0847140 Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable <html><head></head><BODY bgcolor=3D"#FFFFFF"><p><font size=3D2 = color=3D"#0000FF" face=3D"Poster Bodoni ATT"><b>I am trying to get into = doing all grain brewing but I don't know what equipment to purchase. If = anyone is selling anything please let me know. Also, Pico brewing = systems in Michigan have an all grain system consisting of three 20 qt. = pots with all the fittings, a wort chiller, and other things as well for = $400. Does this sound like a good price. This specific setup would allow = for all of the brewing to be done on a typical stovetop which is exactly = what I am looking for due to the fact that I live in an apartment. = &nbsp;The setup is for 5-8 gallons. I recently received this fax and = there are also a lot of &nbsp;even bigger systems in the catalog for up = to 100 gallons. There are nice kits for 15-25 gallon batches for about = $1300. &nbsp;If anyone is interested in this catalog send me an e-mail = and I can get it to you by fax. &nbsp;Thanks again.</p> </font></body></html> - ------=_NextPart_000_01BBFDB1.D0847140-- Return to table of contents
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 16:42:47 -0800 From: "M. Arneson" <marnes at bigfoot.com> Subject: Wanna sell a Stainless 15 Gal keg?? I wanna get my hands on a Stainless 15 Gal keg to make a brewpot. If you have one or know somebody who wants to get rid of one... Please let me know! Thanx!!! *************************************** Mark Arneson marnes at bigfoot.com or marnes at ix.netcom.com *************************************** Return to table of contents
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 97 17:33:33 UT From: Don Van Valkenburg <DONVANV at msn.com> Subject: Hop Comparison by Dry Hopping in the Bottle/ Don Van Valkenburg Here is the results of a recently conducted tasting of 23 different hops that was done for our local club. The Idea has excited me for sometime now. But the execution was a dilemma. How does one do a side by side taste comparison of hops without actually brewing a different batch for each hop? ---- DRY HOPPING! ---- True, dry hopping is not the same as late kettle additions, nor is there the benefit boiling each hop. However, dry hopping does afford one the ability to add in hops to a finished beer. The brew: A grain mash with no specialty grains and a starting gravity of 1.042 and no hops added to kettle. The only bitterness was from a sachet of iso-alpha extract, added to balance the sweetness of the wort. As it turned out the finished beer was still on the sweet side; one control bottle was not dry hopped. The other 23 bottles (the net from this batch was exactly 2 cases of 22 oz bottles) were each dry hopped with approximately 1/2 gram of hop pellets put into the bottle at time of bottling. This amounted to approximately two average size pellets per bottle. There were thus 23 different hops tasted. First a few caveats: I will not attempt to describe each hop, as tastes are very subjective. Instead, I simply want to simply convey some overall impressions and observations about the entire experiment. Different people had different reactions. And, the order of tasting definitely affects the outcome. Above all I want to encourage brewers to experiment on their own with different hops, and provide a guideline for doing your own dry-hopping in the bottle. Impressions: The first surprise was the difference in bitterness from one hop to another. There was definitely bitterness contributed by dry hopping. This goes against everything we know about extraction of bitterness from alpha acids. It is a fact that alpha acids require heat to be isomerised and are not suppose to contribute bitterness unless boiled. So then, where did this bitterness come from? My guess is from the beta acids. My reference book (Hop Variety Characteristics, HOPUNION) confirms that by-products of oxidized beta acids do contribute bitterness. This would also explain why there was no apparent relationship between alpha acid and the perception of bitterness in this tasting. Another variation we noticed from one hop to another aside from bitterness was head retention. The control bottle(no hops) had no head retention, in sharp contrast to those with hops. The tasting was done in groups of hops with similar origins. English hops together, Hallertauer triploids together, etc. We first tasted the Hallertauer and then the Hallertauer triploids: Mt. Hood, Liberty, Crystal, and Ultra. Of these the one that stood out for me was Crystal. It had a distinctive, but nice, lingering aftertaste. I think liberty was the most bitter, followed by Hallertauer. Also tasted in this group was Tettnanger, Spalt Select and Saaz. ----- Saaz was a disappointment, guess one should use lots of Saaz when dry hopping with this hop. After tasting the European type hops we moved on to the British varieties starting with Fuggle. This hop was a marked departure from the previous flavors we were getting. The European type hops gave us descriptors like; floral, spicy & pepper. Fuggle introduced a new descriptor; "earthy". Next was Willamette which gave us similar flavors to Fuggle, but more pronounced nose. We next tasted; E. Kent, W. G. V., Challenger and Northdown. I think the last two were my favorites of the Brits with a good aroma from Challanger and big spicy nose from Northdown. The last grouping was the high alpha varieties starting with N. Brewer, Brewers Gold and going through; Brambling Cross, Cluster, Nuggett, Galena, Chinook and last but not least Columbus. The lesson learned from these is don't write off high alpha hops as only a kettle, or bittering hop. Some had very nice finish characteristics. A couple that stand out are Galena and Columbus. Cluster is one however that I would definitely leave as a kettle (bittering) hop. Don Van Valkenburg DONVANV at MSN.COM Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 10:41:46 -0000 From: Graham Stone <gstone at dtuk.demon.co.uk> Subject: Clarity / Haze / Hot break I recently posted a question concerning 2 almost identical batches of Maris Otter pale ale malt only beers which differed markedly in the way they cleared. You may recall the one which cleared had 1% Chocolate malt whilst the one which refused to clear didn't. I had this reply from Denis Barsalo which, without his permission, I wanted to share with you because I've noticed something else odd about addition of dark grains. Denis writes: >I have got into the habit of always adding a handfull of finely >crushed black malt to all my mashes just before mashing out. I remember >reading about this technique in Papazian's second book as a way of removing >a lot of protein haze from your beer. Maybe that 1% addition of Chocolate >Malt you added to your second batch was responsible for making the beer >clearer!? Now, I also noticed that even with the standard adddition of Irish Moss to the last 15-20 mins of the boil, the wort made with a percentage of dark malts produces a drastic hot break (clear wort and big flocculating lumps etc.) while the pale ale malt only wort produces a much more modest hot break. Coincidence? Is this a direct correlation between hot break and yeast clearing during conditioning? Finally, just to repeat a question posted earlier, does anybody know how long the commercial breweries allow from the time they fill a cask for cask conditioning to the time the beer is ready to drink in the pub? Dr. Graham Stone - ------------------------------------------------------ Dunstan Thomas (UK) Ltd web: http://www.demon.co.uk/dtuk/ email: gstone at dtuk.demon.co.uk phone: +44-1705-822254 fax: +44-1705-823999 - ------------------------------------------------------ Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 97 14:08:51 PST From: Ronnie Baert <Ronald.Baert at hookon.be> Subject: ph-meter elektrodes homebrew at aob.org Good meurning Ameirica! (sorry for the Flemisch accent) Is there any chemist or scientific specialist who can tell us which metal= s that can be used for making elektrodes for a ph-meter? Electronics & measuring =3D no problem.= For our purpose (homebrewing) we measure only a few times per month. For a short measure= ment, and, if you clean after each measure the electrodes, it should be possible to mea= sure acurate the ph using a meter with naked elektrodes. (after calibrating the homemade inst= rument of course). Reason for this question is that commercial ph-meters are developped for = daily use in lab enviroment and that the wort is not the ideal stuf to put in an "osmose" = capillar. The pocket ph meters does not have temperature compensation. My target is making a = simple, but temperature compensated ph-meter that can be put in warm wort for a short= measuring time and after cleaning with a paper tissue, we can store the electrodeset dry= . Best regards from Ron in Bestbeercountry Belgium. Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 97 14:19:43 PST From: Ronnie Baert <Ronald.Baert at hookon.be> Subject: ph-meter elektrodes Good meurning Ameirica! (sorry for the Flemisch accent) Is there any chemist or scientific specialist who can tell us which metal= s that can be used for making elektrodes for a ph-meter? Electronics & measuring =3D no problem.= For our purpose (homebrewing) we measure only a few times per month. For a short measure= ment, and, if you clean after each measure the electrodes, it should be possible to mea= sure acurate the ph using a meter with naked elektrodes. (after calibrating the homemade inst= rument of course). Reason for this question is that commercial ph-meters are developped for = daily use in lab enviroment and that the wort is not the ideal stuf to put in an "osmose" = capillar. The pocket ph meters does not have temperature compensation. My target is making a = simple, but temperature compensated ph-meter that can be put in warm wort for a short= measuring time and after cleaning with a paper tissue, we can store the electrodeset dry= . Best regards from Ron in Bestbeercountry Belgium. Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 08:45:42 -0500 From: Kit Anderson <kit at maine.com> Subject: Re: Big Head >From: smurman at best.com >Subject: Big Head Beer >I'm a fan of Belgian and wheat beers, and one characteristic these >brews share is a big head. I've been unable to replicate the extreme >carbonation that these types of bottle-conditioned brews achieve, even >by adding somewhat excessive amount of corn sugar for priming (within >safety limits). I'm wondering if anyone has Head is not related to carbonation. Head is a function of protein. Belgian wits have both high carbonation (`1 cup dextrose/5 gal) and high protein. The protein come from using 50 % unmalted wheat in the mash. It would be impossible NOT to have a big head unless something in the brewing process is killing it. Like detergents or oils. - ------ Kit Anderson kit at maine.com Bath, Maine The Maine Beer Page http://www.maine.com/brew Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 08:58:02 -0500 From: nerenner at umich.edu (Jeff Renner) Subject: Re: Homebrew Digest V2 #23 Dan FYI from Homebrew Digest V2 #23 Jeff >Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 08:40:05 -0600 (CST) >From: Michael Fross <frosty at cstar.ac.com> >Subject: Sources of Agar > >Happy New Years All! > >I have just decided to start yeast culturing and having been reading FAQs >and HowTos. > >Does anyone know a realitively inexpensive place to get Agar? > >I looked at the Yeast Culture Kit Company's web page. Is this a good >price? They are the only place I can seem to find that sells this kind of >material. > >Cheers (and thanks) > >Frosty >frosty at tp.ac.com - -=-=-=-=- Jeff Renner in Ann Arbor, Michigan c/o nerenner at umich.edu Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 08:59:38 -0500 From: nerenner at umich.edu (Jeff Renner) Subject: Sorry Oops, sorry about that previous post. I forgot to readdress it. I'll be glad for the recall option when Pat Babcock gets HBD. - -=-=-=-=- Jeff Renner in Ann Arbor, Michigan c/o nerenner at umich.edu Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 08:57:59 +0500 (EST) From: macher at telerama.lm.com Subject: Re: Sources of Agar On Wed, 8 Jan 1997, Michael Fross wrote: > Does anyone know a realitively inexpensive place to get Agar? > In addition to finding agag-agar at a Chinese food shop, it is also available at Japanese food stores, and is called Kanten in Japanese. This is commonly available, and to my surprise, after describing what I wanted, my wife who is Japanese, pulled a new pack of it out of a kitchen drawer...two sticks about 3/4 by 1 by 8 inches long. Needless to say, that pack now resides with my brewing stuff...She said it is rather commonly used and is cheap to buy. I had never seen the stuff before, and she knew it as Kanten, so we got the Japanese/English dictionary out, and there it was: agar-agar. Hopes this is of help to someone....now off to plan my new life as a yeast rancher! Bill Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 09:28:49 -0500 From: Bob McCowan <bob.mccowan at bmd.cpii.com> Subject: Weyermann Malz (Bob McCowan) Jim writes: >I have one good suggestion, allow for a *very* long brewday when >using Weyermann malz! I would also be prepared to rake/knife the >grain bed in the lauter tun. Also look to use a false bottom with >the maximum open area, Id be interested to hear of any experiences >of folks mashing Weyermann malz using a single infusion, a Easymasher >tube screen filter, or in a system that does not utilize rakes. Jim: Does this apply to all the Weyermann malts, or are you referring only to the wheat malts? Bob - -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Bob McCowan ATG/Receiver-Protector voice: (508)-922-6000 x208 CPI BMD fax: (508)-922-8914 Beverly, MA 01915 e-mail: bob.mccowan at bmd.cpii.com Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 06:54:40 -0800 From: Sharon/Dan Ritter <ritter at web.camasnet.com> Subject: immersion chiller/filtering wort, Dan Ritter To continue the discussion of wort chilling and filtering...I have been chilling with an immersion chiller that has the coils wired together so that there is a fairly uniform space between the coils of about 1/2". I agitate the coils (by grasping the inflow/outflow tubes) in a gentle circular and up and down manner every two minutes for about 20-35 minutes depending on the season (my tap water temp. varies significantly summer to winter). I also use a prechilling set of coils that sit in a bath of mostly ice to further lower the tap water temp. before it enters the wort chiller. With this technique, I can chill 6 gallons of 195F wort down to 50-55F. After chilling, I let the wort sit for 15 minutes or so and then rack with a copper racking cane that has a Sure Screen attached to the end. A Sure Screen is an Easy-Masher-type screen device that clamps on the end of a 3/8" racking tube. It filters as the wort siphons off the trub and hops (I've been using whole hops since I added the Sure Sreen device to my racking scheme). Recently I've had trouble with the Sure Screen clogging within the first 5 minutes of racking the cooled wort. After reading Alex Santic's remarks in Digest v2 #21, I may stop agitating the chiller and try suspending the chiller and walking away for 30 or so minutes. I believe all the agitation is smashing the whole hops into little bits which then plug the Sure Screen. In the long run I'd like to have my Vollrath SS pot drilled for an Easy Masher but I'm nervous about finding someone in my small town that will do a quality drilling job on a pot I can't afford to replace! Dan Ritter <ritter at camasnet.com> Ritter's MAMMOTH Brewery Grangeville, Idaho Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 10:09:04 -0500 From: Dave Whitman <dwhitman at rohmhaas.com> Subject: Re: sources of agar In HBD #23, Frosty (frosty at tp.ac.com) asks about cheap sources of agar. Try a chinese/oriental grocery. In my area, several such stores carry the same package: two sticks, one natural off-white, one dyed lurid red. The sticks are about 1 in square, maybe 11 inches long. They have the appearance and texture of styrofoam. You can easily tear off chunks to use. If memory serves, I paid $3 or so for the package of two sticks. I'm pretty sure that the dyed stick would work just fine, but I haven't had the nerve to try it yet. You use so little at a time that I've been working with the undyed stick for over a year now and it's less than 1/2 used up. - --- Dave Whitman dwhitman at rohmhaas.com "The opinions expressed are those of the author, and not Rohm and Haas Co." Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 1997 15:12:44 GMT From: "Michael A. Owings" <mikey at waste.com> Subject: Re: EasyMasher Clogging Just another data point: I use the EasyMasher regularly for the boil, as well as Irish Moss, and have never had the EM clog up. Moreover, I agitate the wort during chilling with my immersion chiller. I also use whole or plug hops, however, so that may make the difference. The trub does seem to settle nicely onto the hop bed, under which lies the EasyMasher. To Jim Busch: I used Weyermann Malz for my last batch : Vienna, Munich, a dark munich (the DWC aromatic equivalent -- I forget the name) and dark 35 L caramel. I had no problems with the EasyMasher. This was my first experience with these malts, though.. *********************** Lord grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change. The courage to change the things I can. *** And the wisdom to hide the bodies of the people I had to kill because they pissed me off *** Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 11:25:13 -0500 From: Dan Thompson <thompson at cotf.edu> Subject: mead/beer on an aircraft Hi homebrewers. My question is specifically about mead but applies to homebrew in general. I'm going on a ski trip in Colorado this February. I would like to take a couple bottles of my spiced mead to keep warm during the trip. I have a couple concerns about brining my brew on a comercial flight. Has anyone on the list brought thier homebrew on a comercial aircraft flight? If so, did you do anything special? I'm concerned about: 1)my bottles exploding due to pressure changes 2)the FAA thinking that I'm bringing some type of explosives onboard 3)Am I going to get arrested for bringing a 6pack of my mead across states Any advice would be appreciated. TIA Dan thompson at cotf.edu Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 11:31:49 -0500 From: "J. Matthew Saunders" <saunderm at vt.edu> Subject: Re: time fermenting Tim writes: >...wondering if the amount of time that the wort ferments (bubbles) is an >>indication of thealcohol content. Nope, but the amount of sugars the yeast has to convert to alcohol can affect time. Still, I've had high gravity worts (1.080+) that have all but finished in a day or two and low gravity that have taken two weeks. Also, typically, ales finish faster than lagers. >I know that I should be using a hydrometer but everytime I do it comes out >>1.02. Try it in plain water to see if it still reads 1.02. If it does, your problem could be one of two things. 1) The hydrometer is shot (buy a new one) 2) Is the vessel your testing liquids in deep enough? I did this the first time I used mine <blush>...the hydrometer was touching the bottom of the vessel. >Also will the alcohol content be greater if I use liquid yeast instead of >dry >yeast? No, but boy will your beer taste cleaner! I had been using dry yeasts since the mid-eighties. My last 5 batches I've used liquid yeasts. My beer was good before, now its even better. Cheers! Matthew Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 12:01:38 -0500 (EST) From: KennyEddy at aol.com Subject: New Fermentation Chiller Plans Now On-Line I finally took the time to update and upgrade my Fermentation Chiller. It's viewable on-line from my web page (see address below). The Fermentation Chiller is a home-made "refrigerator" powered by jugs of ice (actually a glorified icebox). It uses a thermostat/fan and a series of internal baffles to dish out only as much cold air as is needed to regulate the temperature of the fermenter. I've been able to maintain 68F ale production in my 90F garage with ice changes every two days. Used indoors, it will reach lager temperatures with similar maintainence. I've added several enhancements to the design, based on feedback from Original Chiller usuers over the last year and a half as well as my own experiences. Even if you've already built one, you might find some useful modifications inthe new version, so I encourage you to check it out. Get started building yours now -- the warmer months are coming (slowly)!! ***** Ken Schwartz El Paso, TX KennyEddy at aol.com http://members.aol.com/kennyeddy Return to table of contents
Date: 09 Jan 97 12:16:32 EST From: "David R. Burley" <103164.3202 at CompuServe.COM> Subject: Re: Belgian carbonation, bulk grain Brewsters: smurman asks about his Belgian beers: > I'm wondering if anyone has > any secrets for getting that "I'm so happy to see you" foamy head. The secret - I krausen with 10 ounces of corn sugar and 1 tlb of malt with yeast from the secondary. My Belgians look just like the pictures! > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Mark Arneson wants to know where to get bulk grain. Mark, I go to an animal feed store since I don't have to worry about the grain having been treated with potentially harmful anti-fungals as may be the case in seed quality grain. - ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Keep on brewin' Dave Burley Kinnelon, NJ 07405 103164.3202 at compuserve.com Voice e-mail OK Return to table of contents
End of HOMEBREW Digest #2304

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