HOMEBREW Digest #3516 Fri 29 December 2000

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  Re: 0,0 Rennerian defined (David Lamotte)
  UK Travelling (Drew Beechum)
  Koalas, Snow ("Thomas P. Smit")
  filters ("steve lane")
  electric HLT ("steve lane")
  Stupid brewer tricks / Eisbock (Nathan Kanous)
  Re: Egg Nog (Jeff Renner)
  Re: High-tech homebrewing in orbit ("Frank J. Russo")
  Kettle drains/pellet hops ("Mike Maag")
  Fridge in cold garage ("Pete Calinski")
  Neoprene gloves ("J. Martin")
  Re. Darcy's Law (John Palmer)
  Counterflow recommendations? ("Bev D. Blackwood II")
  Where the wort flows ("Paul Niebergall")
  Time to brew a stout... ("Greenly, Jeff")
  Welcome Back Jeff Renner ("Phil & Jill Yates")

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---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 18:04:17 +1100 From: David Lamotte <lamotted at ozemail.com.au> Subject: Re: 0,0 Rennerian defined Jeff Renner kindly offered : > For those of you in Oz and other > warmer climes who are lacking the snow necessary for a traditional > northern hemisphere mood, I have large quantities available at only > $1.00/lb. FOB Ann Arbor plus shipping and handling, insulated packing > and dry ice extra. Now while this would be very appropriate as after a recent hot spell my tap water is running at 30 Deg C, I am afraid that I can buy ice for only $0.50/lb at my local service (ie gas) station. But I do intend to use some (home made) ice with a pre-chiller to give me a more respectable water temp into my counterflow chiller when I brew tomorrow. David Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 00:25:06 -0800 (PST) From: Drew Beechum <Drew.Beechum at disney.com> Subject: UK Travelling So I was a good son this year at Xmas and bought my mom a summer vacation to England. We're looking at going over towards the end of July or beginning of August (anyone smell an angling on the GBBF?) and while she's worried about all the usual literary stuff (Stratford, Cambridge, Cantebury, Hastings,etc..) I'm worried about beer stuff. Namely what/where should I angle myself and do and see. What's the one pub in London for instance I must make. Any and all suggestions even non-beer related are welcome. Gratsi. - -- Drew Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 23:10:04 +0930 From: "Thomas P. Smit" <lunica at ozemail.com.au> Subject: Koalas, Snow Now, fellas, some of you may be fed up with certain Aussie posters, but why take it out on some harmless koalas? C'mon, return them to the zoo. I could do with some snow, Jeff, for my bock that'l be mashed on Saturday. Perhaps I could send you some of our sun in return. Cheers Tom Smit Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 08:05:12 -0600 From: "steve lane" <tbirdusa at hotmail.com> Subject: filters Are there any good working designs out there for a home made filter plate or other device for filtering beer? Anybody tried to build one? On another note, filled a corny the other nite with sanitizer from my outdoor faucet and thought I'd better let it sit for awhile. Awhile turned from 1 homebrew into about 5 homebrews and I decided racking brew at this point was not a good idea. Told myself I'd do it tomorrow. You guessed it, at 5 degrees faren., she froze solid as a rock. Any good ideas on what to do with a corny that has a 24 inch split up its' side? How is this material for welding? Thought about building a 1/2 barrel sealed fermenter by cutting the top off. Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 09:27:58 -0600 From: "steve lane" <tbirdusa at hotmail.com> Subject: electric HLT I have a HLT w/ 240 volt element running on 110 house current. Element is at the base above the welded rim and opposite that is the thermocoupler, J type. This is hooked to a Watlow PID controller. My question is, what do others do to get their HLT water up to temp. in a hurry. I don't seem to get near enough power to get to 180 in a reasonable time. I have been heating my water in the mash tun, as it has a burner under it, and then pumping up to the HLT but this is a real hassle. The element is used to just hold the water at the correct temp. in this arrangement. I have run the controller up to, say, 400 to keep the element turned on but even then, it takes forever to get the water up to temp. Is there enough convection in the tank to not require stirring? I have been stirring now and then so that the thermocoupler sees more of the fluid. Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 10:35:34 -0600 From: Nathan Kanous <nlkanous at pharmacy.wisc.edu> Subject: Stupid brewer tricks / Eisbock Hi All, Life is pretty good in Wisconsin....if you like it cold. I brewed an oatmeal stout on Saturday. I ran the hose from the CF chiller outside....by the time the water got into the hose it froze. Blew one of the fittings off my Phil's Chiller. Sprayed water all over me and the garage. Luckily, I was able to get the exit hose to thaw quickly because of the hot discharge water and once flow was established, things went just fine. The brew is fermenting quietly in the basement....at 60 deg F, ambient. Yup, it's been cold in Wisconsin. I believe it was 22 degrees below zero (farenheit) on Dec 24 or 25. It got me thinking (dangerous thing). I said "Self, if it's going to be this friggin' cold, may as well make an Eisbock." Kind of like that "if life gives you lemons, make lemonade" addage. So, input would be appreciated. I would make a regular old dopplebock (or maybe just a bock for lower final volume). Then I'd have to freeze it. Carboy? I'd be a little worried about expansion of the ice and the resulting loss of all that precious beer should the carboy break. Any experiences? I'm still afraid of that. What about freezing in the corney keg? My first thought was the dip tube would freeze and restrict flow. No dip tube would make putting one in the keg post-freeze potentially difficult. My final thought was to freeze in the keg, remove the frozen dip tube and replace with a clean warm dip tube immediately prior to "racking" to another keg. Anybody done this? Does it sound like it would work? I would then proceed with counterpressure bottle filling. Any thoughts, suggestions, or outright lashings would be appreciated. I haven't brewed enough beer lately. TIA. nathan in madison, wi PS anybody ever frozen an ale like this? Eis-scotch ale? Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 11:48:03 -0500 From: Jeff Renner <nerenner at umich.edu> Subject: Re: Egg Nog Egg Nog Fans You may remember my recent email with my father's egg nog recipe, which he adapted from an old Four Roses ad and made every holiday season. Among the people I sent it to was Gary Regan, author of a number of fine books on whiskies and cocktails (http://www.ardentspirits.com). He sent me this email: >Jeff: > >Many thanks for the egg nog recipe--I'll try it out soon. > >Do you know Dale DeGroff? He was head bartender at NYC's Rainbow >Room, and is widely known as one of the country's leading cocktail >experts. He told me a story once about an egg nog recipe created by >his uncle which, if memory serves, was submitted to Four Roses and >used in an ad campaign. It's possible that your recipe is based on >Dale's uncle's recipe! What a coincidence! I'm going to forward >your e-mail to Dale and see if, indeed, it's the same one. > >Have a great holiday season, and a happy and healthy 2001. > >Cheers, Gary And then this one (below), which really fills in the history in a wonderful way. Thanks, Gary! What a wonderful addition to the story. This recipe looks a little less rich than Dad's, maybe more to my taste, actually, although I think I like more bourbon than rum. One interesting difference is that Dad folded the beaten egg yolks into the beaten whites. Another is the use of spiced rum, which one of you said she uses. I hope you'll try them both, or experiment yourselves for your own holiday tradition. >Hi Jeff: > >I wrote to Dale DeGroff, and sure enough, the original recipe came >from a relative of his! Here's what he wrote back: > >Hi Gary, > >Sorry about the empty e-mail. The recipe that Jeff's dad adapted from the >Four Roses ad was My Grandmother's brother's recipe. He submitted the recipe >to them in some kind of contest and the four Roses Pr people or who ever >handled the advertising in those days sent a release for him to sign for its >use on the bottle and in ads. His name was Dominic Gencarelli, he owned a >Granite quarry in Rhode Island among other things. He was an engineer and >figured out a way to build stone jettys into the ocean without renting barges >and tugboats. His Italian stone cutters cut the stone in the quarry in such a >way that on side the stone was flat and the trucks could drive out on the >jetty as it was being built. he built a lot of the jettys along the east >coast especially in New England, but some here on Long Island as well > >He always had two bowls of the punch at Christmas , one for the kids and one >for the grown-ups...here is the recipe., and incidently what made the recipe >special was its lightness twice as much milk as cream and the white of the >egg whipped stiff and folded in to the mix , so it was almost like clouds on >top of the egg nog; > >EGG NOG (Uncle Angelo's) 1 batch (6 people) >6 eggs (separated) >1 qt. milk >1 pint cream >1 tbsp. ground nutmeg >3/4 cup sugar >3 oz. bourbon >3 oz. spice rum >Beat egg yolks well until they turn light in color, adding half a cup of >sugar as you beat. Add milk, cream and liquor to finished yolks. Then beat >egg whites until they peak. Fold whites into mixture. Grate fresh nutmeg over >drink. > >Cheers >Dale DeGroff >aka <A HREF="http://www.kingcocktail.com/index.html">King Cocktail</A> > >http://www.kingcocktail.com/index.html - -- Jeff Renner in Ann Arbor, Michigan USA, c/o nerenner at umich.edu "One never knows, do one?" Fats Waller, American Musician, 1904-1943 Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 11:58:03 -0500 From: "Frank J. Russo" <FJRusso at coastalnet.com> Subject: Re: High-tech homebrewing in orbit - ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 22 Dec 2000 09:47:15 -0500 From: "Pete Calinski" <pcalinski at iname.com> Subject: Re:High-tech homebrewing in orbit, anyone? AND how to chill it Well, there is a second problem. Chilling the beer. - ----------------------------- This conversation has been very interesting. I find it curious how those involved with space programs are striving to make things work in space environments just the same as they would here on mother earth. Well, I guess you have to start somewhere and you start with what you already know. Why would one want to build a cooling unit for use in space that operates / functions the same as a cooling unit here on the ground? It seems to me with the void / cold of space just outside the shell of the craft there would be someway of using that 3 Deg K to cool the beer. If you shut the heaters off in the craft the craft would freeze. So why is it not possible to build a heat exchanger type of apparatus with the external cold and use it to do the cooling? This is instead of compressors which are high energy users. Someone with a little knowledge out there care to increase my knowledge? Frank Russo ATF Home Brew Club New Bern, NC "There is only one aim in life and that is to live it." Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 12:19:59 -0500 From: "Mike Maag" <maagm at rica.net> Subject: Kettle drains/pellet hops I use a "T" shaped Easymasher/Surescreen TM kettle drain (design stolen from Al K., see picture at): http://www.brewinfo.com/mybrewery97/mybrewery3.html It works fine with pellet hops if you don't use Irish Moss and do let the wort settle for 1 hour after chilling. (I use a planispiral immersion chiller which automatically piles the hops and trub in the center of the kettle bottom and chills 11 gal from boiling to 70F in 20 min). The hops need to settle to the bottom so they don't get sucked into the screen holes. Mike Maag, Shenandoah Valley Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 12:18:12 -0500 From: "Pete Calinski" <pjcalinski at iadelphia.net> Subject: Fridge in cold garage Forrest You have told us many times about what we should do with a fridge in a cold ambient. Just what problem(s) will result if I don't take any precautions. I have had a fridge in my garage for over 20 years before I saw your advice. The ambient has gotten quite cold. In fact, beer outside the fridge has frozen while that inside didn't freeze. Does it just not function or am I doing damage? Pete Calinski East Amherst NY Near Buffalo NY Note my new email address is: pjcalinski at adelphia.net The service via my old address at iname.com had become unreliable. Sometimes email was delayed as much as 36 hours. Some never came through. iname.com is a part of mail.com. Repeated emails about the problem to their service address have gone unanswered. If you know anyone that uses either iname.com or mail.com, you should consider telling them that they may have a problem also. Sorry for the inconvenience. Pete Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 17:35:57 From: "J. Martin" <jmartin213 at hotmail.com> Subject: Neoprene gloves hope the holidays treated everybody well... Santa brought me some small brewing goodies. One of these items is a pair of very thick gloves for squeezing spent grain bags. Question though: These beauties are marked "sanitized" and it says they're made out of neoprene. Problem is, they have a very strong "plastic-y" smell to them. I'm worried about introducing glove related off flavors to the wort. Should I be worried? Anybody have any ideas about this? Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 10:35:08 -0800 From: John Palmer <jjpalmer at gte.net> Subject: Re. Darcy's Law Paul posted on the usefulness of Darcy's Law in discussing lauter tun flow. I had made a mistake in context with a previous post where I was discussing How/Where water flowed thru a tun, saying: >But, I don't think Darcy's Law is applicable (too many simplifying assumptions) and the experimental data does not agree with it. Paul rightly points out that it does apply, shows how it works, and gives an experimental range for the hydraulic conductivity of a grainbed K of 0.1-.5 ft/minute, which is the same range that Guy Gregory reported in 1997. Nice to see that their data agrees. What I had been trying to say though was that Darcy's Law (as modified by Wessling (1973)) see http://www.realbeer.com/jjpalmer/Fluidflow.html did not answer for us How and Where the sparge water flowed thru the lauter tun. Guy and I had been trying to describe how many drains you needed to adequately rinse the grainbed using Darcy's Law and discovered that even though Darcy's Law says that 1 pipe will completely drain the lauter tun - Draining is not Lautering. Brewers are not draining grainbeds, we are rinsing them. The euclidean model I derived matched the experimental observations of flow. IE. the shape or coning of the flow to the drain(s) matched the vectors of the gradients predicted by the model. And that was the immediate goal: find a model that describes how sparge water flows thru a grainbed so we could better determine the design of our lautering manifolds. Yes, it is a simple model. Yes, it is a 2D model. But it works: it describes in general what has been observed experimentally in the fish tank. Recently Brian Kern has shown me how a Laplace equation describes the gradients in a linear fashion (as opposed to my logarithmic) and his equations demonstrate the increased flow velocity at the walls that the geotechnical and hydrology engineers say should be there. Thus, I don't think we are on the wrong track. Maybe it is a slower track because I seem to be driving, but I am confident we will get there. Any help anyone can contribute is welcome. Six months ago, I posted to the digest asking for help in determining a 3D model, several people responded, and the consensus so far is that the shape of the gradients in the 3rd dimension (ie along the length of the manifold tubes) is elliptical (ie. slightly squashed hemisphere). Another way of describing it is to say that the drain potential at the midpoint of the manifold's length is higher than at the ends, due to the integral of the available drain sights along the tube. On the other hand, this result begs the same question with false bottoms. Experimental evidence did not show higher flow potential in the center of the tun as demonstrated by where the dye emerged thru the false bottom. Perhaps the change in flow resistance from the grainbed to the manifold is high enough that a unit of water sees a fairly flat gradient along the 3rd axis. Hmmm, time to break out the corncobs and food coloring again. Well, that's enough out of me. Cheers! John - -- John Palmer Palmer House Brewery and Smithy http://www.realbeer.com/jjpalmer How To Brew - the online book http://www.howtobrew.com Let there be Peace on Earth. Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 13:01:05 -0600 From: "Bev D. Blackwood II" <blackwod at rice.edu> Subject: Counterflow recommendations? As the proud owner of a brand new 2-tier brew tree RIMS system (handmade by Phil Endacott) I now find myself wanting a speedier method of cooling my wort than ye olde immersion chiller. Are there any top-flight recommendations? Only the best for my new toy! Thanks! -BDB2 Bev D. Blackwood II http://www.bdb2.com/ Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 14:24:54 -0600 From: "Paul Niebergall" <pnieb at burnsmcd.com> Subject: Where the wort flows Jon Palmer wrote: >>Guy and I had been trying to describe how many drains you needed to >>adequately rinse the grainbed using Darcy's Law and discovered that even >>though Darcy's Law says that 1 pipe will completely drain the lauter tun - >>Draining is not Lautering. Brewers are not draining grainbeds, we are >>rinsing them. The euclidean model I derived matched the experimental >>observations of flow. IE. the shape or coning of the flow to the drain(s) >>matched the vectors of the gradients predicted by the model. I am not sure where you are going with the "rinsing" versus "draining" idea. And I dont see how you can say that you used Darcy's law it to "predict that 1 pipe will completely drain the lauter tun". It has nothing to do with how something drains. If you are talking about un-confined conditions with a free fluid surface than you need to take into account a few other parameters of porous media flow such as the coefficient of storage and the specific yield. There are also characteristic drainage curves that can be developed to describe the relationship between saturated, tension saturated, and unsaturated flow conditions. But all of that is neither here nor there, because it is way outside of the realm of simple flow hrough a lauter tun. (Save the drainange charactistics for another day). >>And that was the immediate goal: find a model that describes >>how sparge water flows thru a grainbed so we could better >>determine the design of our lautering manifolds. Simple to do. Use partical tracking package interface with a 3-D flow model and you will get a good picture of the flow lines showing exactly where the water flows. Or better yet, use an interface that solves a three-dimensional advection- dispersion equation for solute transport and get the concentations (wort gravity) to boot. Return to table of contents
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 17:35:48 -0500 From: "Greenly, Jeff" <greenlyj at rcbhsc.wvu.edu> Subject: Time to brew a stout... Greetings from the mountains of West Virginia.... Well, with a foot or two of snow on its way, I decided to get myself over to Slight Indulgence, the local gourmet shop, for brew stuff. I have decided that, should I get snowed in, I want to have plenty of provisions on hand to brace myself against the bitter cold and snow. I should interject here that I am fully aware that a WVa winter has nothing on what my respected brethren in the Midwest are going through, but then, y'all don't really have to drive in three dimensions, either...;-) I have decided to brew a stout, and as this will be my first serious attempt at a stout, I'd like to make it memorable. Here's what I've got so far... Rusty Nail Outmeal Stout Water 1 tsp gypsum Extracts 3.3 lbs John Bull Dark Extract 3 lbs Munton's Amber DME Steeping Grains 1 lb roasted barley .5 lb black patent malt .5 lb 120L Crystal Malt 1 lb oatmeal Hops 2 oz Northern Brewer at 8.5 (60") 1 oz East Kent Goldings at 5.0 (30") 1 oz East Kent Goldings at 5.0 (10") Yeast Wyeast 1084 Irish Ale (I'm going to try a starter-never done that before) Other Stuff I'd like the benefits of experience here. I'm thinking about adding some unsulphured molasses and some licorice. Should I also be adding malto-dextrin or lactose, or is this overkill with the oatmeal? My targets for this beer (if I'm doing the math right) are: OG: 1.056 TG: 1.017 ABV: 4.5% IBU: 25 <=====figuring this always confuses me! SRM: 40 I'm figuring about a week in the primary, 2 weeks in the secondary, and bottle conditioning (w/light DME) about 2-3 weeks. Am I in the ball park? Peace, Jeff Return to table of contents
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2000 14:52:43 +1100 From: "Phil & Jill Yates" <yates at acenet.com.au> Subject: Welcome Back Jeff Renner Jeff How good to have you back with us and resettled on your throne at the centre of the brewing universe. Sadly I have to report that in your absence some members of the HBD started a dreadful ruckus and some terrible insults were flung back and forward across the pond. At the height of it Graham Sanders came out of the closet and declared himself to be Australian (though the rest of us have never accepted this). And just when the fire seemed to be dying down Graham sprayed it with high octane fuel and it was all on again. Oh it was a horrible mess. Never mind To help mend the bridges I have sent yet another bottle of rice lager to an American. This was my very last bottle. Just after New Year Doc Pivo will be back at Burradoo Estate for a combined brew day. I am going to let him run the show and we will be creating one of his much loved Czech pilsners. This was the beer style which caused so much argument between the Doc and Steve Alexander regarding technique and technology. It will be ready for trialing in late February and the Doc plans to be back here for that occasion. Of course Wes Smith will be here and hopefully Dave Lamotte will make it down from Newcastle. I will make sure I bottle some for use as gifts in the event that Graham causes any further catastrophes here on HBD. In the mean time Jeff, I'm sure things will run smoothly now that you are back at zero zero. And you even have a GPS to prove it. Good luck to all in the New Year, Australians and Americans alike. And even to that pomme blighter Tony Barnsley. Cheers Phil Return to table of contents
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